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The 49ers Should Have Little Difficulty in Grounding the Falcons


Dr. Zanzibar
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Don't know if this was posted before, but it is pretty painful to see a guy be absolutely wrong in every single statement he makes.

Usually you at least get one or two points right, and one part here or one part there changes and then you look kinda foolish, but this guy was thoroughly violated by the Falcons' performance against the Niners.

I'm usually not one to gloat, but this is pretty painful to read.

Hindsight IS 20/20, but when you put yourself out like this....you are just BEGGING to get r@ped by reality.

Featured Columnist Michael Erler

49ers Should Have Little Difficulty In Grounding The Falcons

Now that the Michael Crabtree hysteria has calmed down a bit — at least until he suits up in two weeks at Houston — the San Francisco 49ers and their fans can shift their attention to the trivial matter of Sunday's game versus the 2-1 Atlanta Falcons.

On the surface this looks like a trap game for the local boys.

For one thing, while it's true that the Falcons were NFC West basement-dwellers during the Joe Montana glory days, they no longer reside in our humble little division, and that can't be good.

Last year the 49ers went .500 in the division, but just .400 outside of it, and considering that 10 of 16 are against intra-division foes, that's not where you want to be.

So far this season that trend has played out even more dramatically. 3-0 in the division, 0-1 outside of it, albeit in heartbreaking, last-second fashion at Minnesota.

For another, the Falcons are considered to be pretty good, having gone 11-5 last year with a rookie quarterback in Matt Ryan and a "bowling ball" as 49ers linebacker Patrick Willis described him, in running back Michael Turner.

Then there's the always-thoughtful sportswriter angle; that the distraction of Crabtree's signing will cause the team to lose its focus and not take the Falcons as seriously as they otherwise would have.

Finally, there's the pragmatic school of thought, that in the long run a loss in this game would be far more beneficial than a win.

With the "Bye" coming up on the schedule, a potentially 4-1 team would spend the off week sitting on their fannies and listening to folks tell them how good they are, while a 3-2 team would spend the break frothing at the mouth to avenge themselves.

Or so that theory goes.

49ers coach Mike Singletary dismissed this last notion as patently absurd.

"Our guys understand where we are and that we're not where we want to be," he said.

"We don't even have time to listen to anyone say how great we are, and really I can't even imagine having that conversation with them."

Which sounds all fine and dandy, but let's get to 4-1 first and find out afterward what happens with the team's attitude, just for kicks.

It says here that the 49ers will indeed pull the game out, and not because there is anything so inherently wonderful about them.

Rather, it will be because the Falcons are a comically overrated outfit that doesn't do anything all that well.

Only two teams in the NFL rank no better than 20th in any of the six major team statistical categories: Run, Pass, and Total Offense, and Run, Pass, and Total Defense.

One of them is the Cleveland Browns, and that's perfectly sensible, as the Browns might have less talent on their roster than the University of Florida.

The other such team, however, is Atlanta, who come into the game ranked 23rd in offense (25th rushing, 20th passing), and a ghastly 30th on defense (25th rushing, 27th passing).

San Francisco's offense is an eye sore, but at least they can stop people (4th rushing, 10th passing, and 6th overall).

Atlanta was terrible defensively last year too, so Coach Mike Smith overhauled that unit in the off-season. So far the changes haven't taken. They drafted defensive tackle Peria Jerry from Ole Miss in the first round with the hope that the young man would help them stiffen up against the run, but Jerry tore up his knee and is out for the season.

The acquisition of tight end Tony Gonzalez — a future Hall-of-Famer — was supposed to be a boon for their offense, as he was supposed to be a security blanket in the middle that would loosen the coverage on young wideouts Roddy White and Michael Jenkins.

What has happened, though, is that Ryan has looked almost exclusively for the newcomer, and while that's good for Gonzalez, it's been bad for White and Jenkins who had little problem in loosening up coverage all by themselves last year.

Consequently, the big plays haven't been there for the Falcons offense. Their two receivers have combined for one touchdown, and their longest reception has been for just 26 yards.

Even the 49ers duo of Isaac Bruce and Josh Morgan can top those numbers.

Turner, meanwhile, was abused to the tune of 376 carries last season, a workload designed to drive the bowling ball's career right into the gutter. To no one's surprise (except maybe his fantasy owners'), he's averaging just 3.5 yards per carry this year and has already lost two fumbles.

It's true that the Falcons have won two of their first three — they had a bye last week — but the first was aided greatly by Miami tight end Anthony Fasano putting the ball on the ground twice, and the second was against winless Carolina and quarterback Jake Delhomme, who is either color blind or suffering from shell-shock.

Both of those wins came in the friendly confines of the Georgia Dome. When Atlanta went on the road to New England, they were thumped soundly, 26-10.

The 49ers have been maddeningly consistent through four games of their 2009 campaign. Their level of play has been good enough to win three games and nearly a fourth, and as long as they keep on keeping on, they should grind out another "W" in this one as well.

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/269720-49ers-should-have-little-difficulty-in-grounding-the-falcons

LOL, we were a " Trivial Matter"

Edited by Dr. Zanzibar
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I joined Bleacher Report just to write him a note. Here it is:

Michael:

Please continue to write about the Atlanta Falcons for the bleacher report. Your obvious knowledge about our team and how we would be a "trivial matter" for the 49ers this past Sunday was so enlightening and enjoyable.

It almost made the incredible beat down that this "comically overrated outfit" put on your hilariously inept squad one for the ages.

Keep up the insightful writing. Please tell me that writing and/or football analysis isn't your livelihood. I would hate to have to be that worried about your long-term and immediate future.

Regards,

P.S.-It must suck to be you about now. We are enjoying and passing around your article on the Falcon message board right now.

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I joined Bleacher Report just to write him a note. Here it is:

Michael:

Please continue to write about the Atlanta Falcons for the bleacher report. Your obvious knowledge about our team and how we would be a "trivial matter" for the 49ers this past Sunday was so enlightening and enjoyable.

It almost made the incredible beat down that this "comically overrated outfit" put on your hilariously inept squad one for the ages.

Keep up the insightful writing. Please tell me that writing and/or football analysis isn't your livelihood. I would hate to have to be that worried about your long-term and immediate future.

Regards,

P.S.-It must suck to be you about now. We are enjoying and passing around your article on the Falcon message board right now.

:lol: Classic. If you get a response (I doubt it), you'll just have to post it here. Let him dig himself deeper.

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:lol: Attaboy Gritz.Stick it to the man. ;)

You know, it's one thing to write a reasoned, well-researched article clearly stating why you believe the 49ers might win a game against the Falcons, but to just put yourself way out on a limb writing a misinformed, "homeristic" prediction article that clearly demonstrates you know next to nothing about your opponent....well, that just makes you look incredibly stupid.

I don't know how this guy shows up again to write his next "column" unless he falls on his sword and admits he totally screwed the pooch on this one and owes the Falcons as an organization an apology and a reassessment.

Ah, screw that. We don't need to convert idiots.

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LOL

EATING CROW!!!!

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/270912-bly-shouldnt-be-the-only-one-apologizing-for-49ers-sorry-performance

Bly Shouldn't Be the Only One Apologizing For 49ers Sorry Performance by Michael Erler

Michael Erler Scribe, Featured Columnist

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Scribe Written on October 12, 2009 Single Page

(Photo by NFL Photos) It's Monday and everyone has a case of the "sorry"s.

I'm not so sure who had a worse weekend, the San Francisco 49ers players for putting on such a miserable performance in losing 45-10 to the Atlanta Falcons at home or me for for predicting a ho-hum win for them, but personally I think I suffered a heck of a lot more than they did.

All they had to was play that game. I was the sucker who had to watch it.

The Falcons were a lot better than I thought they were, especially offensively, where they looked darn near perfect in racking up 477 yards against a thoroughly whipped San Francisco defense.

They ran it when they wanted to, passed it to whomever they felt like, and their offensive line had no problems in keeping quarterback Matt Ryan clean, no matter how many blitzers the 49ers sent.

Ryan came into the game as someone with a reputation of being better when blitzed as opposed to being presented conventional defenses and zone coverages, and while he was sharp against pressure on Sunday, he had no problems in picking apart the 49ers secondary regardless of the looks they gave him.

The Falcons certainly were undaunted about matching up receiver Roddy White against highly touted Niners corner Nate Clements, and White abused the smaller Clements early and often on his way eight catches, a franchise-record 210 receiving yards, and two touchdowns, the second of which effectively iced the game for Atlanta.

The dirty birds were able to sprint to a quick 14-0 lead thanks in part to a fortunate interception, where linebacker Mike Peterson deflected 49ers quarterback Shaun Hill's pass into the hands of nickelback Brian Williams, giving the team a short field to work with.

They were in the end zone four plays and 21 yards later, and following a San Francisco three-and-out, marched right down the field again. 49ers coach Mike Singletary tried to rally the troops with a time out, and the players thought so highly of his speech that they allowed Ryan to find a wide open White for a 31-yard touchdown on the very next play.

Not having that time out would prove very costly later in the half.

San Francisco did rally with back-to-back scoring drives, highlighted by a 61-yard catch-and-run from receiver Josh Morgan on a third down pass from Hill, and following a fumble by Falcon scatback Jerious Norwood, the 49ers had the ball down 14-10 and looked to have all the momentum on their side.

It's remarkable to think that just eleven plays later, the game was over.

First the 49ers offense sputtered through another three-and-out, and a third down sack of Hill—right tackle Tony Pashos was the guilty party there—took the team out of field goal range.

Andy Lee had a great punt though, and the defense looked in good shape with the Falcons pinned at their own four.

On third-and-four Ryan floated a pass on the left side toward White and here a beaten Clements took a needless gamble. Instead of understanding he was out of position and giving up a six yard completion—albeit with a new set of downs—he made a desperate leap in the futile hope of deflecting the pass.

White got up higher, made the catch, shook off Clements and rambled 90 yards down the field. He had nobody to get in his way because free safety Dashon Goldson was blitzing on the play, another reason it was foolish of Clements to take the chance he did.

San Francisco was suddenly down 21-10 and it was about to get worse.

Returner Delanie Walker got flipped and put the ball on the turf when he landed on the ensuing kickoff. Though it looked like the ground caused the fumble, the refs didn't see it that way and awarded possession to the Falcons.

Singletary wasted the team's first time out and Hill burned through the other two during the scoring drives, so the team had none left to challenge the call.

Atlanta got the ball on San Francisco's 38-yard line and needed all of three Michael Turner runs to make it 28-10 and just like that a close game turned into a flood, as in fans flooding out of the stadium.

The ones who stayed got to enjoy a real treat.

After cornerback Dre' Bly intercepted Ryan in third quarter—down 35-10 at the time—he decided to prematurely celebrate, and as he high-stepped down the field he was holding the ball like a loaf of bread.

Apparently White was hungry for a sandwich (he must have worked up quite an appetite ravaging the 49ers secondary), so he caught up to the showboating Bly and forced a fumble, which Atlanta recovered.

The sequence didn't have any bearing on the game, but boy did it play poorly on the highlight reel. Bly didn't help himself at all with his defiant comments afterward either, though to his credit he did apologize to everyone on Monday.

Who would've thought that one week after recording their first shutout since 2002 and their most decisive win since 2003, that the 49ers would endure their most one-sided defeat since a 41-0 howler at Kansas City in October of 2006 and their worst loss at Candlestick Park, ever?

They lost 45-3 to the Detroit Lions in 1967 at old Kezar Stadium, but nothing this bad at the "new" place, which is saying something because the 49ers have fielded some absolutely wretched teams both pre-Bill Walsh and pre-Singletary.

That they stunk out the joint on offense without star running back Frank Gore wasn't too surprising—Singletary made it clear that changes were coming for his offensive line— but the way the defense collapsed has to be cause for alarm.

Suddenly the preseason fears reared their ugly head. The pass rush was non-existent, even with the persistent blitzing. Nobody could cover Falcons tight end Tony Gonzalez. The safeties often looked slow (Michael Lewis) and out of position (Goldson).

The run defense deserves a mulligan. Having to take on three bruising monsters in a row in Minnesota's Adrian Peterson, St. Louis' Steven Jackson and then Atlanta's Turner is a lot to ask of any unit.

It didn't help those guys any that they weren't getting much opportunity to rest as their offensive counterparts weren't exactly putting many long drives together.

Until a meaningless drive late in the fourth quarter when the game was long decided, the longest the 49ers held onto the ball on a drive was three minutes, forty-six seconds.

The team has major work to do during its bye week, far more substantial than simply "integrating Michael Crabtree into the offense."

Into what offense? The rest of the players who have been with the program these past 80 days haven't been able to make it look any good.

All in all, it should be an interesting two weeks in Santa Clara.

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I joined Bleacher Report just to write him a note. Here it is:

Michael:

Please continue to write about the Atlanta Falcons for the bleacher report. Your obvious knowledge about our team and how we would be a "trivial matter" for the 49ers this past Sunday was so enlightening and enjoyable.

It almost made the incredible beat down that this "comically overrated outfit" put on your hilariously inept squad one for the ages.

Keep up the insightful writing. Please tell me that writing and/or football analysis isn't your livelihood. I would hate to have to be that worried about your long-term and immediate future.

Regards,

P.S.-It must suck to be you about now. We are enjoying and passing around your article on the Falcon message board right now.

Hahahahahaah, I love it Gritz!

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He's an a with a capital HOLE, I can picture this guy hammering away on a typewriter in some dark basement suite somewhere with no research ,no clue, no business being a sports writer. And guessing a little wrong on the whole situation. Wonder how much the "bleacher report"pays for this trash. Thats all.

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He's an a with a capital HOLE, I can picture this guy hammering away on a typewriter in some dark basement suite somewhere with no research ,no clue, no business being a sports writer. And guessing a little wrong on the whole situation. Wonder how much the "bleacher report"pays for this trash. Thats all.

The bleacher report doesn't pay, it's a free site where anyone can write and publish articles. The cool thing about the site is that the articles get prominently featured in search engines if they are good. Like mine LOL.

Edited by Peyton
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In all objective honesty, the article really wasn't that bad and actually well-written. Sure, it was clearly biased and after the outcome, the writer is left with egg on his face, but he does have some interesting stats to back his point such as: prior to the game, the Falcons were one of only two teams to NOT be ranked in the top-20 in the six major stats as well as a breakdown of we'd actually beaten.

But I want my local beat writer to be "pro-my team" and "anti-everybody else."

With that said he really did short-change us in the victory over MIA. Fasano's fumbles are not the only reason, not even the primary reason, we won that game; but winning the turnover battle will aid any victory. But MIA and CAR were a combined 1-6 entering last week, and true, both victories came at home.

Fair or not, the Falcons did fail the first litmus test presented to them and that's the last memory people have of us. But Falcons win in a rout, so joke's on him!

Edited by Ric Roc
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In all objective honesty, the article really wasn't that bad and actually well-written. Sure, it was clearly biased and after the outcome, the writer is left with egg on his face, but he does have some interesting stats to back his point such as: prior to the game, the Falcons were one of only two teams to NOT be ranked in the top-20 in the six major stats as well as a breakdown of we'd actually beaten.

With that said he really did short-change us in the victory over MIA. Fasano's fumbles are not the only reason, not even the primary reason, we won that game; but winning the turnover battle will aid any victory. But MIA and CAR were a combined 1-6 entering last week, and true, both victories came at home.

Fair or not, the Falcons did fail the first litmus test presented to them and that's the last memory people have of us. But Falcons win in a rout, so joke's on him!

What up Ric havents seen you or sumslap in a while.

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