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What do U call our offense?


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I don't think there is a fancy name for it, but we are a power running team with a verticle play-action based passing attack.

You know what I love about this?...This is almost EXACTLY the same kind of offense that "Quitrino" was supposed to be bringing to ATL in '07. Save for Turner, Hartsock, Baker, Douglas and, of course, Ryan, the same personnel ran philosophically similar offensive sets like Day and Night. Don't get me wrong, I understand that the addition of a Pro Bowl RB and QB is a seismic increase in talent, but my point rests on the seemingly "lost" essence of our offense in all but the last couple of games of 2007. Mularkey/Boudreaux transfered the Dahl/Clabo duo from journeymen to borderline Pro Bowlers, while aiding the development of 2nd year (future All-Pro) Justin Blalock into an above average 16 game starter.

Does this speak to Mularkey's genious or Petrino's ineptitude? Or is the X factor merely the greatness of Matt Ryan? Is Turner just that much of a Merril Hodge-style "factor back," or is Boudreaux something of a Merlin in his ability to cultivate dominant blockers and schemes?

I don't know, but it sure does provide a good sense of perspective of how far the Falcons organization has come in a very short time.

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You know what I love about this?...This is almost EXACTLY the same kind of offense that "Quitrino" was supposed to be bringing to ATL in '07. Save for Turner, Hartsock, Baker, Douglas and, of course, Ryan, the same personnel ran philosophically similar offensive sets like Day and Night. Don't get me wrong, I understand that the addition of a Pro Bowl RB and QB is a seismic increase in talent, but my point rests on the seemingly "lost" essence of our offense in all but the last couple of games of 2007. Mularkey/Boudreaux transfered the Dahl/Clabo duo from journeymen to borderline Pro Bowlers, while aiding the development of 2nd year (future All-Pro) Justin Blalock into an above average 16 game starter.

Does this speak to Mularkey's genious or Petrino's ineptitude? Or is the X factor merely the greatness of Matt Ryan? Is Turner just that much of a Merril Hodge-style "factor back," or is Boudreaux something of a Merlin in his ability to cultivate dominant blockers and schemes?

I don't know, but it sure does provide a good sense of perspective of how far the Falcons organization has come in a very short time.

I remember hearing somewhere that Petrino was very disappointed in the way the draft went. He asked for a powerback, verasitile runblocking TE, an OL, and a good slot receiver for his offense. He was upset when Lynch was left on the board and Snelling was taken...LOL. I wouldn't know how to find it for you, but it really happened. I think one of the asst coaches said it on the way out. Three reasons Pertino quit were...the draft (showed his ugliness after that), Vick trouble (missed a practice for the offensive squad for the first time after that), Shockly injury...straw that broke the camel's back. The way the asst or whoever said it was freaking hiliarious.

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You know what I love about this?...This is almost EXACTLY the same kind of offense that "Quitrino" was supposed to be bringing to ATL in '07. Save for Turner, Hartsock, Baker, Douglas and, of course, Ryan, the same personnel ran philosophically similar offensive sets like Day and Night. Don't get me wrong, I understand that the addition of a Pro Bowl RB and QB is a seismic increase in talent, but my point rests on the seemingly "lost" essence of our offense in all but the last couple of games of 2007. Mularkey/Boudreaux transfered the Dahl/Clabo duo from journeymen to borderline Pro Bowlers, while aiding the development of 2nd year (future All-Pro) Justin Blalock into an above average 16 game starter.

Does this speak to Mularkey's genious or Petrino's ineptitude? Or is the X factor merely the greatness of Matt Ryan? Is Turner just that much of a Merril Hodge-style "factor back," or is Boudreaux something of a Merlin in his ability to cultivate dominant blockers and schemes?

I don't know, but it sure does provide a good sense of perspective of how far the Falcons organization has come in a very short time.

Petrino was supposed to be more of a spread offense with a power running attack. Think a base 3 WR set, while still pounding the rock to keep the defense honest. The closest thing I could think of to compare his offense to would have been an exotic version of the Colts offense, with less focus on the TE. In this offense, every player was either a WR or a blocker. The problem here is that you need a very strong offensive line, and a QB who can stretch the field. Joey Harrington and our 2007 offensive line was anything but those two. This was supposed to compliement Vick, in that he could use his mobility to stretch the field that much more, leading to numerous 1 on 1 match-ups. Think the 2008 Patriots with Vick at the helm, let's not get into a debate about him though.

Mularkey's base offense is the I-Formation. He likes to employ multiple TE sets and simply outmatch the front-7 of the defense with the TEs being used more as blockers. Once he can establish the run game, or at least have the opponent believe he is going to be running, he will mix in a heavy dose of play-action. A big thing in his offense is to use WRs in tandem routes to overload the safeties, which generally involves the WRs going over the middle. The emphasis here is being able to get 4 yards or more, regardless of the down or situation. Be able to punch them in the mouth, regardless of who we're playing. The WRs need to be able to run block well, as well as be willing to go over the middle and catch passes. It's a very old-school style of offense, and it all starts with being able to out-physical the defense. If you run into a team that can essentially beat you at the LOS, you run into problems very quickly. No run game, no play-action, the defense wins. You get the first Bucs game of last year. I'm not even going to bother getting into Mularkey's love for the occasional weird trick play to keep the defense honest.

The great thing about Ryan though is that he can manage the offense, even without a running game. It's hard to do, but his no-huddle 3WR sets with a healthy dose of Norwood really puts a lot of pressure on opposing defenses. Essentially then you are simply just reading and reacting in the passing game. Ryan is a great QB in this regard, because he is so smart. He can read the defense, and react accordingly. In the future, I have no doubt we will be able to go to a 3-4 WR set and just "Peyton Manning" the defense into 30+ points a game if need be. Ryan is truely special.

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