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Flayko247
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Just wanted some opinions about the Falcons "possibly" drafting Pettigrew with the #24 pick. Before all manner of he!! breaks loose, let me make my point.

I realize defense is by far our most pressing need, which is why I think the Pettigrew pick is unnecessary.

Secondly, I've heard different ones say that it would give Ryan another weapon who could exploit the middle of the field.

Hold on a second...............................

We released a good tight end in Crumpler because he "didn't fit" the new coach's system; needed someone to block more than receive.

As stated earlier, now it appears they "possibly" want to get a tight end that's more of a receiving threat.

Was it because Crumpler became injured more often, salary issues, etc.?

I just don't understand the logic in getting rid of a very good tight end who was proven in the league only to draft an "unproven" one!!

With the #24 pick the Atlanta Falcons select.........................................

DEFINITELY A DEFENSIVE PLAYER!!

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I am very excited about the draft. I am counting down days, but I am pretty sure if we draft Pettigrew that will ruin my day. And the Falcons 2009 draft. We need DEFENSE!!! Maybe a TE in the 3rd or 4th. I like Cornelius Ingram if he wasn't hurt last year he would have been one of the highest rated TE's in the draft.

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Pettigrew would be great in our offense IMO. I think we can afford to pass on defense at 24 because I like the players we have on our roster on defense and we have new players we have groomed who is ready to step up(Nicholas, Jackson,Lewis and Decoud). That is why I think we might draft Pettigrew at 24 despite our defensive needs. With Pettigrew on our offense the other team will never be able to read based on the TE if it is a run or a pass. He can be a safety valve for Ryan when nothing else is open. His great size will create matchup problems and even though he is covered up you can throw it to his far outside and he will use his long arms to catch the ball with no chance of the CB breaking up the pass. He may not be a downfield threat but with his natural hands and great ability make a tough catch and of course also his great ability to block he will add a new dimension to our offense.

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Just wanted some opinions about the Falcons "possibly" drafting Pettigrew with the #24 pick. Before all manner of he!! breaks loose, let me make my point.

I realize defense is by far our most pressing need, which is why I think the Pettigrew pick is unnecessary.

Secondly, I've heard different ones say that it would give Ryan another weapon who could exploit the middle of the field.

Hold on a second...............................

We released a good tight end in Crumpler because he "didn't fit" the new coach's system; needed someone to block more than receive.

As stated earlier, now it appears they "possibly" want to get a tight end that's more of a receiving threat.

Was it because Crumpler became injured more often, salary issues, etc.?

I just don't understand the logic in getting rid of a very good tight end who was proven in the league only to draft an "unproven" one!!

With the #24 pick the Atlanta Falcons select.........................................

DEFINITELY A DEFENSIVE PLAYER!!

I'll give my opinion on this because I was just thinking about it last night. Pettigrew fits an area of need but I don't believe that he is the right guy for the job being that I see him as a late 1st round and maybe even early 2nd round pick. I think that you can get the second best projected DT (and maybe the best character DT) in Peria Jerry at this spot and take a good TE later in the 3rd or 4th round.

Shawn Nelson might possibly be there for us in the 3rd and if he isn't then we take Anthony Hill in the 4th

Brandon Pettigrew TE Oklahoma State 6-6/263/ 4.80

Shawn Nelson TE Southern Mississippi 6-5/240/4.52

Anthony Hill TE North Carolina State 6-5/262/4.84

All three have comparable size and speed and all three are known to be good blockers. Pettigrew may turn out to have a better career but you may be able to acquire two quality players rather than just Pettigrew.

As for why Alge Crumpler was released I think it has to do with a few things like recent injuries and the fact that he was a known Vick supporter. The new regime wanted to move on from Vick and they knew they needed to get the strongest Vick supporters out of the locker room meaning Horn, Hall and Crumpler had to go. When you combine injuries, Vick support and declining numbers it just didn't make sense to the new regime to keep Crumpler around at his salary. I'll also let it be known that Roddy White is known to be a Vick supporter but one voice isn't nearly as strong as several and if you don't have the support of other Vick supporters you aren't as likely to get out of line.

I wont be terribly upset if we draft Pettigrew but if I were doing the picking I pass and take a TE later because I feel that with Ryan other TE's can put up similar #'s to Pettigrew and we can strengthen the DT position with the 1st.

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If we don't draft Pettigrew this year I hope we pick up Ryans former teammate Ryan Purvis in the 6th. He is a great blocker and has nice hands. He could be a nice 2nd string TE.

If we pass on Pettigrew then lets wait till next years draft by getting a future TE and draft Jermaine Gresham

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Crumpler was old and on the down-side of his career. He was also very opinionated in the locker room, which may have rubbed some people the wrong way.

I really like Pettigrew but, just not at 24. There are plenty of good tight-ends that will be of better value later in the draft.

IMHO, either a CB or pass ruhing DE needs to be the first pick. And then, get the other one in the second. LB, S, TE, OL and DT should be day 2 selections.

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Crumpler was old and on the down-side of his career. He was also very opinionated in the locker room, which may have rubbed some people the wrong way.

I really like Pettigrew but, just not at 24. There are plenty of good tight-ends that will be of better value later in the draft.

IMHO, either a CB or pass ruhing DE needs to be the first pick. And then, get the other one in the second. LB, S, TE, OL and DT should be day 2 selections.

As far as DE I really liked Lawrence Sidbury but unfortunately he seems to have moved into an area between the 2nd and the 3rd where we can't get him. One way of looking at it is that it's awfully early to be drafting another DE with the 1st pick but another way to look at it is that if you have a chance to get a pass rusghing DE then you take it because you want to have a strong rotation of guys that can constantly put pressure on the QB (see 07-08 NY Giants).

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Overview

Regarded by many as the most complete tight end in the 2009 NFL Draft, Pettigrew has not only proven to be a clutch short-area receiver, but an outstanding blocker. A physical open-field runner, he has gained more than 40 percent of his yardage after the catch. He has also shown his pedigree as a pass catcher, becoming the first tight end in school history to amass more than 100 receptions (112) in a career.

Playing for a team known more for its running game, Pettigrew is likely to become just the second tight end in school history to hear his name called in the first round of the draft, joining Reuben Gant (1974, Buffalo).

Playing in the Big 12 Conference, a league that has produced numerous NFL tight ends, many opposing coaches agree that Pettigrew is that rare breed with unlimited potential, regarding him as the best product to play that position since the league expanded from eight teams in 1996. Ranked ninth overall on the school's receiving yardage record list with 1,450, Pettigrew averaged more than 54 knockdown blocks per season for the Cowboys.

Pettigrew was one of three players from Robert E. Lee High School to earn All-State honors in 2003. Despite playing primarily as a blocker, he was rated as the best tight end in Texas by numerous recruiting services. The All-District and All-East Texas choice also competed on the defensive line.

Pettigrew enrolled at Oklahoma State in 2004, spending the season as a red-shirt after turning down offers from Texas A&M, Texas Christian, Southern Methodist and Arkansas.

In 2005, he started nine games, including the last seven, for the Cowboys. He gained 128 yards with a touchdown on 11 catches (11.6 avg). He delivered 30 knockdowns and also recorded a solo tackle.

The following season, Pettigrew was firmly entrenched as the team's starting tight end, leading the squad with eight touchdown-resulting blocks. He finished third on the team with 24 receptions, gaining 310 yards (12.9 avg) with four touchdowns. He also excelled on special teams, recording six tackles (3 solos) and recovered a fumble.

As a junior, Pettigrew captured All-Big 12 Conference honors. He was credited 540 yards and four scores on 35 receptions (15.4 avg), third-best on the team. He paced the league's tight ends with 10 touchdown-resulting blocks and also made a solo tackle.

Off-field issues occupied most of Pettigrew's 2008 spring and summer, and he was further hampered by a high ankle sprain early in the campaign that would sideline him for three games. He was still named a finalist for the Mackey Award, given to the nation's top tight end. He snared a career-high 42 passes, ranking second on the squad. He totaled 472 yards (11.2 avg) with four touchdowns, as he posted 43 knockdowns and two solo tackles, but failed to score for the first time during his collegiate career.

With professional scouts regularly visiting Oklahoma State leading up to the draft, OSU tight ends coach Doug Meacham noted, "Brandon is a classic tight end. In the era of increasingly athletic players and spread offenses, the college tight end has become more of an oversized receiver. But not in Stillwater, where even in the spread, they run the ball nearly 50 times a game. In today's game, you see a lot of tight ends that split out a majority of the time. Brandon can go down inside and grind with the best of 'em, then he can get out and mismatch linebackers or safeties. He's an every-down guy.

"Once last season, Pettigrew came to the sidelines begging his coaches to call a play to his side of the field. A running play. That's what makes him special. Plenty of tight ends will beg for the ball, trying to get their receiving numbers up. But Pettigrew wants to win, whether he's scoring touchdowns or opening holes for others to score them."

Oklahoma State offensive coordinator Trooper Taylor said, "With his 6-foot-6, 265-pound frame, athletic ability and soft hands, Pettigrew would have a future in the NFL. His brutally physical blocking makes him a likely first-round draft choice. I've had tight ends that like to catch and not block, and ones that could block, but couldn't catch. But I've never had the combination like this. Whatever NFL team takes him is going to have them a special gem."

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Look at what Crump did last year with the Titans and you will see why we got rid of him. I love him but we cut him at the right time if there is such a thing.

Right. Crump is banged up. His top flight days are over. He still may have some magic in the tank, but over the long haul, he is not what he used to be.

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Overview

Regarded by many as the most complete tight end in the 2009 NFL Draft, Pettigrew has not only proven to be a clutch short-area receiver, but an outstanding blocker. A physical open-field runner, he has gained more than 40 percent of his yardage after the catch. He has also shown his pedigree as a pass catcher, becoming the first tight end in school history to amass more than 100 receptions (112) in a career.

Playing for a team known more for its running game, Pettigrew is likely to become just the second tight end in school history to hear his name called in the first round of the draft, joining Reuben Gant (1974, Buffalo).

Playing in the Big 12 Conference, a league that has produced numerous NFL tight ends, many opposing coaches agree that Pettigrew is that rare breed with unlimited potential, regarding him as the best product to play that position since the league expanded from eight teams in 1996. Ranked ninth overall on the school's receiving yardage record list with 1,450, Pettigrew averaged more than 54 knockdown blocks per season for the Cowboys.

Pettigrew was one of three players from Robert E. Lee High School to earn All-State honors in 2003. Despite playing primarily as a blocker, he was rated as the best tight end in Texas by numerous recruiting services. The All-District and All-East Texas choice also competed on the defensive line.

Pettigrew enrolled at Oklahoma State in 2004, spending the season as a red-shirt after turning down offers from Texas A&M, Texas Christian, Southern Methodist and Arkansas.

In 2005, he started nine games, including the last seven, for the Cowboys. He gained 128 yards with a touchdown on 11 catches (11.6 avg). He delivered 30 knockdowns and also recorded a solo tackle.

The following season, Pettigrew was firmly entrenched as the team's starting tight end, leading the squad with eight touchdown-resulting blocks. He finished third on the team with 24 receptions, gaining 310 yards (12.9 avg) with four touchdowns. He also excelled on special teams, recording six tackles (3 solos) and recovered a fumble.

As a junior, Pettigrew captured All-Big 12 Conference honors. He was credited 540 yards and four scores on 35 receptions (15.4 avg), third-best on the team. He paced the league's tight ends with 10 touchdown-resulting blocks and also made a solo tackle.

Off-field issues occupied most of Pettigrew's 2008 spring and summer, and he was further hampered by a high ankle sprain early in the campaign that would sideline him for three games. He was still named a finalist for the Mackey Award, given to the nation's top tight end. He snared a career-high 42 passes, ranking second on the squad. He totaled 472 yards (11.2 avg) with four touchdowns, as he posted 43 knockdowns and two solo tackles, but failed to score for the first time during his collegiate career.

With professional scouts regularly visiting Oklahoma State leading up to the draft, OSU tight ends coach Doug Meacham noted, "Brandon is a classic tight end. In the era of increasingly athletic players and spread offenses, the college tight end has become more of an oversized receiver. But not in Stillwater, where even in the spread, they run the ball nearly 50 times a game. In today's game, you see a lot of tight ends that split out a majority of the time. Brandon can go down inside and grind with the best of 'em, then he can get out and mismatch linebackers or safeties. He's an every-down guy.

"Once last season, Pettigrew came to the sidelines begging his coaches to call a play to his side of the field. A running play. That's what makes him special. Plenty of tight ends will beg for the ball, trying to get their receiving numbers up. But Pettigrew wants to win, whether he's scoring touchdowns or opening holes for others to score them."

Oklahoma State offensive coordinator Trooper Taylor said, "With his 6-foot-6, 265-pound frame, athletic ability and soft hands, Pettigrew would have a future in the NFL. His brutally physical blocking makes him a likely first-round draft choice. I've had tight ends that like to catch and not block, and ones that could block, but couldn't catch. But I've never had the combination like this. Whatever NFL team takes him is going to have them a special gem."

This came off of the CBS sports website but you left out the part where the compare him to Jim Kleinsasser. It's a good thing that I didn't post all of this on Nelson and Hill as well as Pettigrew. I had it in the post but I thought it was too much to bother with.

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Just wanted some opinions about the Falcons "possibly" drafting Pettigrew with the #24 pick. Before all manner of he!! breaks loose, let me make my point.

I realize defense is by far our most pressing need, which is why I think the Pettigrew pick is unnecessary.

Secondly, I've heard different ones say that it would give Ryan another weapon who could exploit the middle of the field.

Hold on a second...............................

We released a good tight end in Crumpler because he "didn't fit" the new coach's system; needed someone to block more than receive.

As stated earlier, now it appears they "possibly" want to get a tight end that's more of a receiving threat.

Was it because Crumpler became injured more often, salary issues, etc.?

I just don't understand the logic in getting rid of a very good tight end who was proven in the league only to draft an "unproven" one!!

With the #24 pick the Atlanta Falcons select.........................................

DEFINITELY A DEFENSIVE PLAYER!!

As far as the Crumpler part goes... did you see him in Tennessee? He's just not the same player. I'm actually kind of glad we got rid of him when we did.

Secondly, while I too think defense is our most pressing need... I don't see too many defensive players at the bottom of the 1st round that would be a better football player than Pettigrew.

I've wrestled with it for a while, and I'm now okay with them drafting Pettigrew if it came down to it... unless a really good defensive player takes a really unexpected fall down to our pick.

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I feel 100% certain we go with a defensive player with our 1st pick, wherever it happens. We need at least TWO impact D players in this draft, hopefully who will play lots this year. Our D was soooooo mediocre last year, TD and Smitty have focused on what they need to be dominant. I think they feel they can get a decent tight end in the 3rd round. :rolleyes:

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If we don't draft Pettigrew this year I hope we pick up Ryans former teammate Ryan Purvis in the 6th. He is a great blocker and has nice hands. He could be a nice 2nd string TE.

If we pass on Pettigrew then lets wait till next years draft by getting a future TE and draft Jermaine Gresham

I hear alot of people saying let's wait to draft Gresham. I personally, hope we don't suck bad enough to have a shot at Gresham. He's going in the first 12 picks IMO.

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This came off of the CBS sports website but you left out the part where the compare him to Jim Kleinsasser. It's a good thing that I didn't post all of this on Nelson and Hill as well as Pettigrew. I had it in the post but I thought it was too much to bother with.

I actually got that from NFL.com

That was the whole article.

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We released a good tight end in Crumpler because he "didn't fit" the new coach's system; needed someone to block more than receive.

As stated earlier, now it appears they "possibly" want to get a tight end that's more of a receiving threat.

Was it because Crumpler became injured more often, salary issues, etc.?

I just don't understand the logic in getting rid of a very good tight end who was proven in the league only to draft an "unproven" one!!

Crumpler was great at one time but he was getting older and having health issues. In order to rebuild a team you need to go younger and more coachable. It is also a frame of mind issue. We needed to let some of the people go that had gotten used to a losing frame of mind. I am not saying they caused our losses but they had been through too many of them. Let them go elsewhere and have another chance and free up some roster spots for fresh faces and new energy. You have to remember that players are fans too and we have all gotten a little to used to mediocrity. This is one of the reasons I have come to accept the departure of even more vets this year. I will miss them but it is time for new leadership.

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I don't think a TE should be taken in the 1st rd unless the guys is VERY rare. I do not think Olsen has justified himself as a first round talent. Tony Gonzalez has, but a TE in this offense should DEFINITELY not be taken in the first round. We won't use him enough to get first round value out of. I think Pettigrews receiving skills are very underrated, but i still do not believe he warrants a first round pick. Peele does a fine job at TE for us and he is very cheap. I would much rather have one in the 4th rd.

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