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Brandon Pettigrew


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At first i was a bit sceptical about this guy.

But just watched some highlights of him, and he actually looks decent. theres the "First Draft" thing about him on nfl.com aswell. He's got a lot of heart...

would the falcon faithful be happy with him as a pick in this yuears draft, and would you be happy starting him?

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the speed is scary, but think about the amount of TEs in the league who dont run sub 4.6. Crump at his prime was not running 4.6 for us in pads guys... He is older than the other TEs, and with Hartsock and Peele on the roster, i see us taking more of a project, nelson or ingram.

going to be a good player though for sure

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I like Pettigrew too, and after the FO said they didnt want Smith because he lack of blocking ability it is appearent to me that the team prefers blocking before receiving. I think that two other players fit the mold Davon Drew and Anthony Hill if we dont get Pettigrew in the first, but after watching First Draft I really dont mind if we get Grew in the 1st.

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Dimitroff has always said that he drafts on a need- and system-specific basis. He will also look at the draft and put prospects in tiers, so that he can judge whether he can draft alternative prospects in later rounds.

The defense needs DT and a LB. It also could use a good pass rushing DE. The offense needs depth at the OL and a dual threat TE.

When Dimitroff looks at this draft he will look at each position and judge the depth of talent. So, let's go through this:

DT: We will not get a chance to draft Raji. However, there are a few good DT's that can help stop the run (Scott, Brace, Hill). We don't have to draft a DT in the first round because we can pick up a similarly talented one later on.

LB: Curry and Cushing will be off the board. Do Sintim, Matthews and English have skills, specific to our needs, that are clearly better than Beckwith, Freeman, McKenzie, Ivy and Williams? I don't think so. Hence, we don't have to draft a LB in the first round.

DE: Orakpo and Brown will get drafted pretty early. The next tier of DE's are pretty similar, so drafting one in the first round would not be a great value. The only exception would be Michael Johnson. MJ may have truly exceptional physical traits, but his college production have not put him in the elite group. Drafting him would be a gamble on greatness.

OL: There will be a run on OT's ahead of our pick. It happens nearly every draft. The remaining OL's will fall into a rather large second tier of prospects. The depth of that tier will last into the third round. No need to reach for an OT here.

TE: This is where "need-based" and "system-specific" meets Value. If Pettigrew falls to the #24 pick, he should be at the top of Dimitoff's list. He is the only TE in this draft that can pass protect like an OT and still be a reliable, tough receiver that can, consistently move the chains. Pettigrew is not fast, but he gains separation by making great cuts and using his body to shield the ball. Nelson is a fine prospect, but he needs a lot of work on blocking. He is also not the receiver that BP is. Cook is a WR (TO style) that has never seriously blocked anyone. Casey is an older prospect that will not likely get any better. Coffman might be a good later round pick, but his blocking will be a problem for several seasons. Phillips has desire, but he lacks athleticism. HIll is also a good prospect, but he drops too many balls and he has the habit of lunging for blocks. Clearly, the only TE in this draft, that fits our run-first offense, is Pettigrew.

This draft is deep in receiving TE's, but has only one dual threat TE.

If Pettigrew is available in the first round, he should be our pick. The defense can be addressed in subsequent rounds without sacrificing quality or fit.

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Dimitroff has always said that he drafts on a need-basis, system-specific basis. He will also look at the draft and put prospects in tiers, so that he can judge whether he can draft alternative prospects in later rounds.

The defense needs DT and a LB. It also could use a good pass rushing DE. The offense needs depth at the OL and a dual threat TE.

When Dimitroff looks at this draft he will look at each position and judge the depth of talent. So, let's go through this:

DT: We will not get a chance to draft Raji. However, there are a few good DT's that can help stop the run (Scott, Brace, Hill). We don't have to draft a DT in the first round because we can pick up a similarly talented one later on.

LB: Curry and Cushing will be off the board. Do Sintim, Matthews and English have skills, specific to our needs, that are clearly better than Beckwith, Freeman, McKenzie, Ivy and Williams? I don't think so. Hence, we don't have to draft a LB in the first round.

DE: Orakpo and Brown will get drafted pretty early. The next tier of DE's are pretty similar, so drafting one in the first round would not be a great value. The only exception would be Michael Johnson. However, MJ would be a gamble on greatness, despite a lack of stellar producion ion college. He would be a great risk.

OL: There will be a run on OT's ahead of our pick. It happens nearly every draft. The remaining OL's will fall into a rather large second tier of prospects. The depth of that tier will last into the third round. No need to reach for an OT here.

TE: This is where "need-based" and "system-specific" meets Value. If Pettigrew falls to the #24 pick, he should be at the top of the list. He is the only TE in this draft that can pass protect like an OT and still be a reliable, tough receiver that can move the chains. Nelson is a fine prospect, but he needs a lot of work on blocking. He is also not the receiver that BP is. Cook is a WR (TO style), Casey is an older prospect that will not likely get any better. Coffman might be a good later round pick, but his blocking will be a problem for several seasons. Phillips has desire, but he lacks athleticism. HIll is also a good prospect, but he drops too many balls.

This draft is deep in receiving TE's, but has only one dual threat TE.

If Pettigrew is available in the first round, he should be our pick. The defense can be addressed in subsequent rounds without sacrificing quality or fit.

HOnestly after looking at the TE prospects, the only TE that could come in and start immediatley is BP, but the thing that you have to consider is the fact that we have two serviceable TE on the roster now, so there is no immediate need for BP to start, giving us the ability to develop a prospect in the later round similiar to our LB situation or our DE situation. Based on my own individual assessment of the situation I would rather go with Nelson in the second espeically if we can trade out of the 1st for a 2nd round pick and a third round pick. If we do pick BP, i wouldnt be upset.

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Dimitroff has always said that he drafts on a need-basis, system-specific basis. He will also look at the draft and put prospects in tiers, so that he can judge whether he can draft alternative prospects in later rounds.

The defense needs DT and a LB. It also could use a good pass rushing DE. The offense needs depth at the OL and a dual threat TE.

When Dimitroff looks at this draft he will look at each position and judge the depth of talent. So, let's go through this:

DT: We will not get a chance to draft Raji. However, there are a few good DT's that can help stop the run (Scott, Brace, Hill). We don't have to draft a DT in the first round because we can pick up a similarly talented one later on.

LB: Curry and Cushing will be off the board. Do Sintim, Matthews and English have skills, specific to our needs, that are clearly better than Beckwith, Freeman, McKenzie, Ivy and Williams? I don't think so. Hence, we don't have to draft a LB in the first round.

DE: Orakpo and Brown will get drafted pretty early. The next tier of DE's are pretty similar, so drafting one in the first round would not be a great value. The only exception would be Michael Johnson. However, MJ would be a gamble on greatness, despite a lack of stellar producion ion college. He would be a great risk.

OL: There will be a run on OT's ahead of our pick. It happens nearly every draft. The remaining OL's will fall into a rather large second tier of prospects. The depth of that tier will last into the third round. No need to reach for an OT here.

TE: This is where "need-based" and "system-specific" meets Value. If Pettigrew falls to the #24 pick, he should be at the top of the list. He is the only TE in this draft that can pass protect like an OT and still be a reliable, tough receiver that can move the chains. Nelson is a fine prospect, but he needs a lot of work on blocking. He is also not the receiver that BP is. Cook is a WR (TO style), Casey is an older prospect that will not likely get any better. Coffman might be a good later round pick, but his blocking will be a problem for several seasons. Phillips has desire, but he lacks athleticism. HIll is also a good prospect, but he drops too many balls.

This draft is deep in receiving TE's, but has only one dual threat TE.

If Pettigrew is available in the first round, he should be our pick. The defense can be addressed in subsequent rounds without sacrificing quality or fit.

Yeah, I agree, Pettigrew would be a good first pick and if not available, I'd like to see them take Herman Johnson for possibly the RG position! Can't go wrong with an extremely athletic, 6'7", 364 LB offensive guard! :o

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Dimitroff has always said that he drafts on a need- and system-specific basis. He will also look at the draft and put prospects in tiers, so that he can judge whether he can draft alternative prospects in later rounds.

The defense needs DT and a LB. It also could use a good pass rushing DE. The offense needs depth at the OL and a dual threat TE.

When Dimitroff looks at this draft he will look at each position and judge the depth of talent. So, let's go through this:

DT: We will not get a chance to draft Raji. However, there are a few good DT's that can help stop the run (Scott, Brace, Hill). We don't have to draft a DT in the first round because we can pick up a similarly talented one later on.

LB: Curry and Cushing will be off the board. Do Sintim, Matthews and English have skills, specific to our needs, that are clearly better than Beckwith, Freeman, McKenzie, Ivy and Williams? I don't think so. Hence, we don't have to draft a LB in the first round.

DE: Orakpo and Brown will get drafted pretty early. The next tier of DE's are pretty similar, so drafting one in the first round would not be a great value. The only exception would be Michael Johnson. MJ may have truly exceptional physical traits, but his college production have not put him in the elite group. Drafting him would be a gamble on greatness.

OL: There will be a run on OT's ahead of our pick. It happens nearly every draft. The remaining OL's will fall into a rather large second tier of prospects. The depth of that tier will last into the third round. No need to reach for an OT here.

TE: This is where "need-based" and "system-specific" meets Value. If Pettigrew falls to the #24 pick, he should be at the top of Dimitoff's list. He is the only TE in this draft that can pass protect like an OT and still be a reliable, tough receiver that can, consistently move the chains. Pettigrew is not fast, but he gains separation by making great cuts and using his body to shield the ball. Nelson is a fine prospect, but he needs a lot of work on blocking. He is also not the receiver that BP is. Cook is a WR (TO style) that has never seriously blocked anyone. Casey is an older prospect that will not likely get any better. Coffman might be a good later round pick, but his blocking will be a problem for several seasons. Phillips has desire, but he lacks athleticism. HIll is also a good prospect, but he drops too many balls and he has the habit of lunging for blocks. Clearly, the only TE in this draft, that fits our run-first offense, is Pettigrew.

This draft is deep in receiving TE's, but has only one dual threat TE.

If Pettigrew is available in the first round, he should be our pick. The defense can be addressed in subsequent rounds without sacrificing quality or fit.

You make a good point and I there's gonna be a lot of upset people on the board come April 25th when Pettigrew is the pick. Better hope Philly takes him Pettigrew haters because if he makes it past #21, he's ours.

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Yeah, I agree, Pettigrew would be a good first pick and if not available, I'd like to see them take Herman Johnson for possibly the RG position! Can't go wrong with an extremely athletic, 6'7", 364 LB offensive guard! :o

The o-line starters are set. Pettigrew is the only offensive option in the first round. If not him it will be defensive help which, imo, is where we'll go anyway. WE shall see. I can't wait. Time is moving way too slow.

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You make a good point and I there's gonna be a lot of upset people on the board come April 25th when Pettigrew is the pick. Better hope Philly takes him Pettigrew haters because if he makes it past #21, he's ours.

:D I wouldn't be upset if we take him I just have a little concern about his lack of speed. If TD takes him I will have no doubts because I believe in his ability to know talent when he sees it.

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if BP's incident with the cop is not a big deal in the eyes of TD then i would not mind him at all at 24. it would be great to have a powerful blocker on the line that is also a significant threat for the pass.

that was a great breakdown by bgarcia. the only thing i would argue is the comment that BP is the only dual threat in this draft class. i think Drew can also be considered a dual threat, though he would not be a day 1 starter like BP.

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I really like BP. Maybe he doesn't have the speed to be a downfield threat but he can create matchup problems with his size, when he is in you can't tell if it is a run or a pass play because he can do both, he has reliabe hands and he is actually if you look at tape with him very tough to bring down. He is one of my favorite prospects for The Falcons to draft

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if BP's incident with the cop is not a big deal in the eyes of TD then i would not mind him at all at 24. it would be great to have a powerful blocker on the line that is also a significant threat for the pass.

that was a great breakdown by bgarcia. the only thing i would argue is the comment that BP is the only dual threat in this draft class. i think Drew can also be considered a dual threat, though he would not be a day 1 starter like BP.

I found this article from Washington Post where he talks about it:

One of the many things that the spread offense has changed about college football, and by proxy the pipeline of talent that graduates to the NFL, is the tight end position. The 1980's brought the more modern pass-catching tight end to the fore with players such as Kellen Winslow and Ozzie Newsome, but over the last few seasons, the balance of the position -- the fact that tight ends are expected to block at a reasonable level as well as catch the ball -- has become skewed to the point where the higher percentage of players at the position come into the draft as enlarged receivers with minimal blocking skills and maximum playmaking ability. The true hybrid tight end in 2008 was Notre Dame's John Carlson, who was drafted by the Seahawks in the second round.

At the 2008 Scouting Combine, Carlson ran a 4.88-40, which put him a tenth of a second behind faster offensive tackles. Not what teams were looking for in a tight end if they wanted vertical threats from a new position. But Carlson had other strengths -- route-running skills, the ability to separate from defenders in tight windows, and a willingness to block. Because he was so NFL-ready, Carlson caught more passes (55) for more yards (627) and more touchdowns (five) than any other first-year tight end, ahead of relative speedsters Dustin Keller and Martellus Bennett. The traditional tight end had just as much to offer as the new breed.

One member of the 2009 draft class watching this trend with interest is Oklahoma State tight end Brandon Pettigrew. The 6'5 ¾", 264-pound Cowboy didn't rack up the best numbers -- 112 receptions for 1,450 yards and nine touchdowns -- but no other tight end in this class can decimate a linebacker, or put an evil block on a defensive end, like Pettigrew. That's where his value lies, and that's why Pettigrew's the top-rated at his position.

This despite a disappointing Combine, and his inability to work out at his Pro Day, on March 11, due to a hamstring strain. The edge for Pettigrew is that he's less about speed and more about game tape -- of all the 2009 tight ends, he benefits most from what's on film. In a recent interview for this article, Pettigrew said that teams still talked to him at his Pro Day despite the injury. "Baltimore was on me a little bit. Atlanta talked to me a lot at the Combine. I talked to about 16 teams there. I talked to five or six teams at my Pro Day, but a lot of teams had already broken me down at the Combine."

Ironically, it was while trying to improve his 40 time at Michael Johnson Performance that Pettigrew got hurt. "I strained the hamstring on my right leg (on the 4th). I was working out, running my 40, I got about 30 yards out, and it just kind of bit me." He was training with the former Olympic Sprinter, and had been since the beginning of the year, to work on his speed. Has it helped? "You can't really teach speed, but you can teach form," he said at the Combine. "I don't think my form was great when I first got there. But I know it's a lot better now. I focused on my starts as opposed to just running the 40."

Pettigrew played in more of a run-based spread offense than others, with narrower line splits and more power formations. It was a good fit for his abilities. "I did a lot of blocking. I didn't get a lot of balls, but I was happy when I did. I think the blocking separates me from everybody else -- I can still get out on my routes pretty good. I would line up attached [to the offensive line] and detached. In a three-by-one formation [three receivers, one tight end], I would be detached, or in a two-by-two formation [two receivers, two tight ends], I would be attached. But we ran a lot of three-by one where I would be attached and detached."

The variety of formations gave Pettigrew the opportunity to do more things in preparation for the next level, as Mike Mayock of the NFL Network noted at the Combine. "He's a plus/minus Jason Witten," Mayock said, comparing him to the Cowboys' productive tight end. "He's not a blazer -- I thought he might be a 4.75 guy. I was surprised that he ran 4.85, but it doesn't change one iota what I think he is. He's an inline tight end that will block his tail off, and he might not be as fast as some of those vertical guys, but he can separate and catch the football."

NFLDraftScout.com Senior Analyst and PreDraft Panelist Rob Rang agrees. "For some teams, Pettigrew's lack of downfield speed will be a significant factor. In today's wide-open offense, Pettigrew simply lacks the acceleration to challenge defenses down the seam like a Dallas Clark or Kellen Winslow, Jr. but he does have rare agility for a tight end of his size to get open in the short and intermediate zones. He catches the ball securely and is among the better, more physically gifted blockers we've seen in a highly ranked tight end in years. In a traditional pro-style offense, Pettigrew has the all-around game to make an immediate impact."

The product of a single-parent home, Pettigrew was born in Tyler, Texas, and raised by his mom, Elaine, who worked in a nursing home to support her four kids. "My dad is incarcerated," he said. "I have two older sisters and an older brother. Everyone was pretty much out of the house when I was growing up, but I still hung out with my brother a lot. I'm really close to my brothers and sisters -- we have a really close family.

He was a late bloomer in the game that would give him a shot at something special. "I really didn't play Pop Warner football growing up -- didn't play football until seventh grade. And I really didn't get any game action on the field until my sophomore year in high school. Because of a torn ACL, I missed my junior year, but I played my senior year. Signed with Oklahoma state after I graduated from high school, had a pretty good career there, and now, I'm a little bit closer to where I want to be."

Pettigrew wasn't heavily recruited coming out of Lee High School. "I got offers from Texas Tech and Texas A&M, as well as some smaller schools. I wanted to be different, and when I got to Oklahoma State for a visit, I felt comfortable -- it felt like home. They treated me like I was at home, and everyone was really cool. I was really having fun, and I enjoyed it."

His coach, Mike Gundy, is best-known for one YouTube moment in which he went ballistic on a reporter, but for Pettigrew, his coach has been a fountain of support and life lessons. The support came after Pettigrew's arrest for assault and battery of a police officer on January 20, 2008.

"I was here in Stillwater, Oklahoma, and I went to a party with three friends, and one of them got into a fight with another guy who was there," Pettigrew explained. "I went over to try and pull my friend out of it, and a bigger fight started over that. Someone called the police, and the police came and took everybody out. As we were leaving, an officer grabbed me over the shoulder, and I elbowed him to try and shove him away. It was my fault. I didn't slug him, just elbowed him to shove him away. He arrested me right then for assault on a police officer.

"Coach Gundy called me into his office, and he knew that wasn't me, and it was more embarrassment than anything. Embarrassed my program, my family, myself -- just me. All the NFL teams wanted to know what I had to say about it. I didn't try and beat around the bush -- I told them exactly what happened."

What else did he gain from his time with the coach? "It's been a learning experience for him, as well. He took on a lot with that head coaching job, and he preaches about doing the little things right. That really sticks with me, because if you do the little things right, it will go a long way. He taught me things that had to do with more than football -- things that were life lessons, as well."

Pettigrew and his agent, Sean Howard of Octagon Football, both confirmed with me that if teams wish to see him run in a private workout before the draft, that will be no problem when Pettigrew is ready to run again at the end of March. Some teams, cognizant of his abilities beyond the limited evaluations that track speed can bring, are ready to make the call based on what they've seen. Teams like the Atlanta Falcons, who reportedly took a pass on former Philadelphia Eagles tight end L.J. Smith because they need a better run-blocker in their offensive system, may find Pettigrew to be just the kind pf player they're looking for in the late first round.

All they have to do is to look for the guy who's about more than his stats.

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I found this article from Washington Post where he talks about it:

I agree, I think that some Members of the Board are just trying to find some reason other that his on the field play not to pick him. Pit really doesnt have a vaild reason, beside his brother is a cop (Just Kidding, I really dont know) :D

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I agree, I think that some Members of the Board are just trying to find some reason other that his on the field play not to pick him. Pit really doesnt have a vaild reason, beside his brother is a cop (Just Kidding, I really dont know) :D

Yeah it's kinda one of those things where emotion takes over judgment and he did something stupid as a result. As long as he's learned from it then it really shouldn't be an issue.

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I'm not a fan. But I guess I'm just hung up on the whole "assualting an officer" thing. He is the best all-around TE in the draft. But I don't think the Falcons are looking for an everydown TE. They have a GREAT blocking TE in Hartsock and a decent blocking/receiving TE in Peele(stop gap). Some one earlier in the thread said BP is the only TE that could come in as start from day one. I don't really think that is what the Falcons need.

Nelson is a very good receiver that can stretch the field down the middle and has shown to be a willing blocker(and can improve on that with coaching). I think he is the type of TE the Falcons should pursue. And use the top 2 picks on greater needs i.e. LB, DT, S, CB.

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I'm not a fan. But I guess I'm just hung up on the whole "assualting an officer" thing. He is the best all-around TE in the draft. But I don't think the Falcons are looking for an everydown TE. They have a GREAT blocking TE in Hartsock and a decent blocking/receiving TE in Peele(stop gap). Some one earlier in the thread said BP is the only TE that could come in as start from day one. I don't really think that is what the Falcons need.

Nelson is a very good receiver that can stretch the field down the middle and has shown to be a willing blocker(and can improve on that with coaching). I think he is the type of TE the Falcons should pursue. And use the top 2 picks on greater needs i.e. LB, DT, S, CB.

I like Shawn Nelson, If the FO believes that he can develop into a good blocker then they make take him in the later rounds.

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I'm not a fan. But I guess I'm just hung up on the whole "assualting an officer" thing. He is the best all-around TE in the draft. But I don't think the Falcons are looking for an everydown TE. They have a GREAT blocking TE in Hartsock and a decent blocking/receiving TE in Peele(stop gap). Some one earlier in the thread said BP is the only TE that could come in as start from day one. I don't really think that is what the Falcons need.

Nelson is a very good receiver that can stretch the field down the middle and has shown to be a willing blocker(and can improve on that with coaching). I think he is the type of TE the Falcons should pursue. And use the top 2 picks on greater needs i.e. LB, DT, S, CB.

I think that's exactly what the FO is looking for. We'll see, but I do think he'll be the pick there.

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I think that's exactly what the FO is looking for. We'll see, but I do think he'll be the pick there.

Or we might trade down. I really hope that the FO see Nelson as a potential all-around TE with the potential to improve his blocking. He would be a great pickup, but i do understand the reasoning behind getting Pettigrew. I would rather move down and pick up an additional second.

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Or we might trade down. I really hope that the FO see Nelson as a potential all-around TE with the potential to improve his blocking. He would be a great pickup, but i do understand the reasoning behind getting Pettigrew. I would rather move down and pick up an additional second.

Who knows, I just try to keep a open mind and not question a man who's been in this business for years. I'll be happy with whoever we get really.

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