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Who are your favorite guitarists


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I saw them with Jimmy in Huntsville 2 years ago (it was JB's birthday too, very cool) and Herring absolutely ripped. He was faithful to Houser's parts and added so much to them. He's blistering fast, but does it with superb feel and phrasing. He has a cool trick that in the middle of a run in the key of A, for example, he'll shift into A# for a few notes to add some dissonance, then resolve the phrase back in A, very cool sound. If you and I did it, it would just sound like we suck, but he pulls it off, haha.

I know what you're talking about and that is what I call an I-smell-jazz trick...outside notes. I'm not all that crazy about that but it is just a matter of taste. one of my really gifted jazz guitar friends and I were watching a vid of Jimmy playing and he was saying how he thought he was so much better than Warren Haynes and didn't see what people like about Warren. I felt kind of just the opposite. I get kind of tired of the speedfreak play style like Al Dimeola (sp). If you want outside notes give me Buddy Guy. :lol:

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I know what you're talking about and that is what I call an I-smell-jazz trick...outside notes. I'm not all that crazy about that but it is just a matter of taste. one of my really gifted jazz guitar friends and I were watching a vid of Jimmy playing and he was saying how he thought he was so much better than Warren Haynes and didn't see what people like about Warren. I felt kind of just the opposite. I get kind of tired of the speedfreak play style like Al Dimeola (sp). If you want outside notes give me Buddy Guy. :lol:

I'll play outside notes sometimes - unintentionally after about the 8th beer. Which coincidentally makes it sound ok. Go figure. I love Herring to death, but some of the speedy runs he does can get repetitive. I'd take Warren over him, he makes his les pauls absolutely CRY with emotion. His phrasing is impeccable. And as good of a guitar player as he is, he's almost an even better singer. His acoustic cover of Into the Mystic sends chills down my spine.

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I'll play outside notes sometimes - unintentionally after about the 8th beer. Which coincidentally makes it sound ok. Go figure. I love Herring to death, but some of the speedy runs he does can get repetitive. I'd take Warren over him, he makes his les pauls absolutely CRY with emotion. His phrasing is impeccable. And as good of a guitar player as he is, he's almost an even better singer. His acoustic cover of Into the Mystic sends chills down my spine.

:lol: I hear ya. Outside notes are OK...they are really almost necessary. I couldn't play that fast if I wanted but I really like tone, vibrato, phrasing, slurs, etc. better. Herrng is certainly no slouch and , frankly, I'm not real familiar with him compared to some others. Check out Randall Bramblett's new CD. I bet you'd like it. not really a "guitar album" but has good playing (Davis Causey from Sea Level) and great writing.

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I know that dude. He can play!

Yes he can...I was actually surprised when I got that cd and heard that guitarist...a lot better than your typical bar band guitarist...the vocalist in that band is pretty cool too...turns out he's a pretty good conversationalist too...has some of the best sayings and stories that I've heard outside of my family's get togethers... :lol:

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I know what you're talking about and that is what I call an I-smell-jazz trick...outside notes. I'm not all that crazy about that but it is just a matter of taste. one of my really gifted jazz guitar friends and I were watching a vid of Jimmy playing and he was saying how he thought he was so much better than Warren Haynes and didn't see what people like about Warren. I felt kind of just the opposite. I get kind of tired of the speedfreak play style like Al Dimeola (sp). If you want outside notes give me Buddy Guy. :lol:

My instructor is showing me a bit about throwing arpeggios and major scales over blues chords, and the minute I tried it, I immediately realized I'm not fit to wire up Buddy Guy's rig (not that this isn't IMMEDIATELY apparent to everyone else when I play, mind you).

1) It's not easy.

2) It's REALLY hard.

3) It's even harder if you're trying to keep it sounding anything at all like minor blues.

4) Did I mention it's REALLY hard?

I can do it in fits and starts. Buddy Guy just colors all outside the lines and it ends up as a Picasso.

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Has anyone mentioned Carlos Santana before you did?

If not, that is a glaring omission. Santana has to be on anyone's top 10 list.

yep, he was mentioned on page 1...however, I don't think anyone mentioned Eddie Hazel before I did...and that, IMO, was a glaring ommission, at least until page 3... :P

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My instructor is showing me a bit about throwing arpeggios and major scales over blues chords, and the minute I tried it, I immediately realized I'm not fit to wire up Buddy Guy's rig (not that this isn't IMMEDIATELY apparent to everyone else when I play, mind you).

1) It's not easy.

2) It's REALLY hard.

3) It's even harder if you're trying to keep it sounding anything at all like minor blues.

4) Did I mention it's REALLY hard?

I can do it in fits and starts. Buddy Guy just colors all outside the lines and it ends up as a Picasso.

I don't know enough about what I'm doing when I play to use terminology. But I like to just grab an arbitrary note and then somehow make it work either by going back into more traditional scales or just bending it until it complies. Guy seems to kind of approach it this way. He is such an emotional player and that is what I try for. Ton80...you are too kind.

BTW, Dave, I went to the guitar store today and played a bunch of Martins and Taylors. the Taylors were noticeably brighter sounding. The Martins sounded "tighter" if that makes sense. I cannot recall all the model numbers. i must have strummed ten or twelve. Clouds didn't exactly part. I figure I can sound just as crummy on my old $200 Fender.

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I don't know enough about what I'm doing when I play to use terminology. But I like to just grab an arbitrary note and then somehow make it work either by going back into more traditional scales or just bending it until it complies. Guy seems to kind of approach it this way. He is such an emotional player and that is what I try for. Ton80...you are too kind.

BTW, Dave, I went to the guitar store today and played a bunch of Martins and Taylors. the Taylors were noticeably brighter sounding. The Martins sounded "tighter" if that makes sense. I cannot recall all the model numbers. i must have strummed ten or twelve. Clouds didn't exactly part. I figure I can sound just as crummy on my old $200 Fender.

BnB...that's probably the first time I've ever been called that...but my modesty prevents from denying the accusation... :lol: :P

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I don't know enough about what I'm doing when I play to use terminology. But I like to just grab an arbitrary note and then somehow make it work either by going back into more traditional scales or just bending it until it complies. Guy seems to kind of approach it this way. He is such an emotional player and that is what I try for. Ton80...you are too kind.

That's probably right. I notice that Buddy bends to chord tones a lot.

BTW, Dave, I went to the guitar store today and played a bunch of Martins and Taylors. the Taylors were noticeably brighter sounding. The Martins sounded "tighter" if that makes sense. I cannot recall all the model numbers. i must have strummed ten or twelve. Clouds didn't exactly part. I figure I can sound just as crummy on my old $200 Fender.

Wait until you find one that speaks to you.

Also, make sure the store is properly humidified. I've been in some stores where the same guitar sounds great one day and awful the next. Plays great one day and awful the next. Humidity is critical to an acoustic.

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That's probably right. I notice that Buddy bends to chord tones a lot.

Wait until you find one that speaks to you.

Also, make sure the store is properly humidified. I've been in some stores where the same guitar sounds great one day and awful the next. Plays great one day and awful the next. Humidity is critical to an acoustic.

We have a really great guitar store here in Auburn. they have a special room for the acoustics with a dehumidifier running all the time. Actually are having some Taylor Workshop on Monday evening but I doubt I'll go. I think I kind of like the dreadnaughts best just for the boom. If I played my cheapie next to them I'd probably really hear a huge difference. If I get one I want one with electric capability....one that is known to sound good amplified--not like the worst of both worlds, i.e, a crummy sounding electric or a crummy sounding acoustic--which is my usal experience with acoustics playing with a band. Pretty hard to pull off with a drum pounding nearby.

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We have a really great guitar store here in Auburn. they have a special room for the acoustics with a dehumidifier running all the time. Actually are having some Taylor Workshop on Monday evening but I doubt I'll go. I think I kind of like the dreadnaughts best just for the boom. If I played my cheapie next to them I'd probably really hear a huge difference. If I get one I want one with electric capability....one that is known to sound good amplified--not like the worst of both worlds, i.e, a crummy sounding electric or a crummy sounding acoustic--which is my usal experience with acoustics playing with a band. Pretty hard to pull off with a drum pounding nearby.

To my ears, Martins are the kings of dreads. That's what I set out to get when I ended up with the Taylor. A Martin D28, HD28 or HD28V is the "sound in my head" when I think of a good acoustic.

But my Taylor 816 does a passable facsimile of that sound. A smidge brighter, but the bigger body really warms up the low end.

If you can, try a Guild D55 or the Bluegrass Special.

And FWIW, if you can't find one that has onboard electronics, get the one you like best and throw a K&K Pure Western Mini in it. It's a soundboard transducer system that sounds AWESOME.

And if you decide you want to spend less and get a great amplified sound (more so than a really nice acoustic sound), look at Takamines and Ovations. I don't really like the pure acoustic sound of either, but they undisputedly sound nice plugged in.

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To my ears, Martins are the kings of dreads. That's what I set out to get when I ended up with the Taylor. A Martin D28, HD28 or HD28V is the "sound in my head" when I think of a good acoustic.

But my Taylor 816 does a passable facsimile of that sound. A smidge brighter, but the bigger body really warms up the low end.

If you can, try a Guild D55 or the Bluegrass Special.

And FWIW, if you can't find one that has onboard electronics, get the one you like best and throw a K&K Pure Western Mini in it. It's a soundboard transducer system that sounds AWESOME.

And if you decide you want to spend less and get a great amplified sound (more so than a really nice acoustic sound), look at Takamines and Ovations. I don't really like the pure acoustic sound of either, but they undisputedly sound nice plugged in.

You're the man. They did not have any of the 28 models as I had remembered that number and looked for it. They also have Guild there and Gallagher as well as some other cheaper guitars I think. the Martins almost sounded a little muted by comparison to the Taylors. A friend of mine who works there said his favorite guitar in the house was a Taylor dread thats old for around $1600...can't remember the model. The strings neck felt a little looser and livelier than the Martins. there was Martin I kind of liked best but I cannot recall the model. It was a dreadnaught. They are all incredibly expensive, aren't they?

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You're the man. They did not have any of the 28 models as I had remembered that number and looked for it. They also have Guild there and Gallagher as well as some other cheaper guitars I think. the Martins almost sounded a little muted by comparison to the Taylors. A friend of mine who works there said his favorite guitar in the house was a Taylor dread thats old for around $1600...can't remember the model. The strings neck felt a little looser and livelier than the Martins. there was Martin I kind of liked best but I cannot recall the model. It was a dreadnaught. They are all incredibly expensive, aren't they?

You don't want the cheap ones, so for all intents and purposes, they are all expensive.

And it's not that a cheap Martin is a "bad" guitar, but you can buy a NICE Epiphone Masterbuilt with all solid woods and good features for $600 all day long, so a laminate Martin just for the name doesn't make a lot of sense to me.

The Guild D55 can be had for well under $2000, and it's a really nice dread for the money. You can get it with or without the D-TAR electronics.

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We have a really great guitar store here in Auburn. they have a special room for the acoustics with a dehumidifier running all the time. Actually are having some Taylor Workshop on Monday evening but I doubt I'll go. I think I kind of like the dreadnaughts best just for the boom. If I played my cheapie next to them I'd probably really hear a huge difference. If I get one I want one with electric capability....one that is known to sound good amplified--not like the worst of both worlds, i.e, a crummy sounding electric or a crummy sounding acoustic--which is my usal experience with acoustics playing with a band. Pretty hard to pull off with a drum pounding nearby.

I miss the Auburn guitar store, those guys are really nice. Lance worked on a couple of my guitars while I was there. The new acoustic room is really nice too.

I love the tone of Martins, they have that "boom." I've only played one though. I've always heard they have high actions, set up for flat picking. My dad has a Taylor 810 from the late 90's, I love that guitar. He hates it though, and claims he wants to sell it, but I've been begging him to keep it. Between it, the 335 and the telecaster I'm in heaven when i go home. He's had humidity problems with it though, the binding has cracked at some of the fret ends.

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JDave, I remember you saying they bastardized the new McCarty, and I found this video with Paul himself and some guy demoing it. I think it actually sounds kinda cool. I've always heard that splitting a humbucker doesn't quite sound like a regular single coil. In the video I can hear the difference, and to be a set neck mahogany body/neck guitar, with the switch flipped it sounds suprisingly stratty.

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JDave, I remember you saying they bastardized the new McCarty, and I found this video with Paul himself and some guy demoing it. I think it actually sounds kinda cool. I've always heard that splitting a humbucker doesn't quite sound like a regular single coil. In the video I can hear the difference, and to be a set neck mahogany body/neck guitar, with the switch flipped it sounds suprisingly stratty.

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Check out the DGT -- coil taps on it sound VERY realistic. I don't feel any desire at all to buy a Strat because the taps on the DGT sound so **** good, AND the regular humbuckers are way better than your typical Les Paul or even the original McCarty. In the review video below, he pulls the tap about 3:14, but watch the whole thing. It's a really fine guitar.

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I don't really have a problem with the McCarty II. It just wasn't my cup of tea. I didn't really like the MVC, and I REALLY didn't like the fact that it relied on batteries and could not be turned off without turning off any semblance of a tone control. Just wasn't my thing. To me, if they made a David Grissom model with a stoptail, that would be the real heir to the McCarty. They honestly should have named the McCarty II something else, IMHO. Good enough guitar, but it is just a fork in the road for the original McCarty, whereas the DGT is more of a natural evolution of that guitar.

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Check out the DGT -- coil taps on it sound VERY realistic. I don't feel any desire at all to buy a Strat because the taps on the DGT sound so **** good, AND the regular humbuckers are way better than your typical Les Paul or even the original McCarty. In the review video below, he pulls the tap about 3:14, but watch the whole thing. It's a really fine guitar.

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I don't really have a problem with the McCarty II. It just wasn't my cup of tea. I didn't really like the MVC, and I REALLY didn't like the fact that it relied on batteries and could not be turned off without turning off any semblance of a tone control. Just wasn't my thing. To me, if they made a David Grissom model with a stoptail, that would be the real heir to the McCarty. They honestly should have named the McCarty II something else, IMHO. Good enough guitar, but it is just a fork in the road for the original McCarty, whereas the DGT is more of a natural evolution of that guitar.

I'm sold. If I could find a music store dumb enough to do it, I'd trade my les paul straight up for one in McCarty Tobacco sunburst. Killer video, though a little heavy on the twang bar. He appeared to be arroused just by holding that thing, which makes me want one.

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I'm sold. If I could find a music store dumb enough to do it, I'd trade my les paul straight up for one in McCarty Tobacco sunburst. Killer video, though a little heavy on the twang bar. He appeared to be arroused just by holding that thing, which makes me want one.

It is a seriously awesome guitar. Not for everyone (I SO wish they made one in stoptail), but for me, it was worth dealing with the setup and tuning headaches of the trem and the weight (mine is over 9 pounds!!!) for the absolutely incredible tone and playability this guitar has. It is just a fantastic axe.

Check one out when you get a chance. They are killer guitars. BTW, when I got mine, I was looking for a Les Paul.

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I've got an inexpensive Parker that has coil switching. It's pretty cool though I seldom play the guitar. Big volume drop going from humbuckers to single coil.

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Mine drops volume, but the tone is VERY much like a Strat, and it's not that much volume.

I tend to hate coil taps, but PRS got the idea right on the (original) McCarty and DGT. Probably the pickups.

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