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On the overturned reception


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What the heck is the rule? I don't seem to know what a catch is anymore. I have watched football for thirty- two years and to me Roddy made the catch.

The rules keep changing. Basically they ruled that he didn't maintain possession after landing on the ground.

Nearly any football fan will tell you that the ground can't cause a fumble. That's true in college but untrue in the NFL. Anyone want to challenge me on this one?

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The rule is that if a player is falling as he makes the catch, he has to maintain possession when he hits the ground. As it was, Roddy was falling because he was being tackled, so I thought it should still be a catch. He was robbed. I guess the referee thought he was falling as he caught it, which means no matter how many feet are in bounds, he has to keep possession of it. Stupid rule.

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The rules keep changing. Basically they ruled that he didn't maintain possession after landing on the ground.

Nearly any football fan will tell you that the ground can't cause a fumble. That's true in college but untrue in the NFL. Anyone want to challenge me on this one?

You're not wrong. They also do not consider the "football move" anymore. From what I saw on the replay, once his arms hit the ground, he bobbled the ball. I wanted the catch, but I do not think it was the wrong call.

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This was a catch, there is 0 question about it, The Rule is if the player is going to the ground to MAKE the catch, then he must posess it all the way to the ground. He can't drop it or bobble it...HOWEVER...that rule does not apply here, he caught the ball, took 3 steps in bounds, and was tackled to the ground, forcing the ball out of his hands, if anything it's a catch and a fumble out of bounds. The play should have never been overturned, it was a catch as clear as day. The NFL Refs botched yet another one, this one will be overlooked because we got the W, but guys, just get used to it, we haven't had 1 well called game at home ALL season, it's like they want us to lose at the dome...

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The rules keep changing. Basically they ruled that he didn't maintain possession after landing on the ground.

Nearly any football fan will tell you that the ground can't cause a fumble. That's true in college but untrue in the NFL. Anyone want to challenge me on this one?

That's true in the NFL as well. The ground can't cause a fumble. It can only cause an incomplete pass after a WR takes 3 steps but doesn't complete a twirl in the air. This is football for Chirst's sake! Not ballet! How is a spin more of a football move than taking 3 strides?!?!?!?!

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That's true in the NFL as well. The ground can't cause a fumble. It can only cause an incomplete pass after a WR takes 3 steps but doesn't complete a twirl in the air. This is football for Chirst's sake! Not ballet! How is a spin more of a football move than taking 3 strides?!?!?!?!

The ground can absolutely cause a fumble. Don't think pass, think run.

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The rules are:

Forward Pass

A forward pass may be touched or caught by any eligible receiver. All members of the defensive team are eligible. Eligible receivers on the offensive team are players on either end of line (other than center, guard, or tackle) or players at least one yard behind the line at the snap. A T-formation quarterback is not eligible to receive a forward pass during a play from scrimmage.

Exception: T-formation quarterback becomes eligible if pass is previously touched by an eligible receiver.

An offensive team may make only one forward pass during each play from scrimmage (Loss of 5 yards).

The passer must be behind his line of scrimmage (Loss of down and five yards, enforced from the spot of pass).

Any eligible offensive player may catch a forward pass. If a pass is touched by one eligible offensive player and touched or caught by a second offensive player, pass completion is legal. Further, all offensive players become eligible once a pass is touched by an eligible receiver or any defensive player.

The rules concerning a forward pass and ineligible receivers:

a. If ball is touched accidentally by an ineligible receiver on or behind his line: loss of five yards.

B. If ineligible receiver is illegally downfield: loss of five yards.

C. If touched or caught (intentionally or accidentally) by ineligible receiver beyond the line: loss of 5 yards.

The player who first controls and continues to maintain control of a pass will be awarded the ball even though his opponent later establishes joint control of the ball.

Any forward pass becomes incomplete and ball is dead if:

a. Pass hits the ground or goes out of bounds.

b. Pass hits the goal post or the crossbar of either team.

A forward pass is complete when a receiver clearly possesses the pass and touches the ground with both feet inbounds while in possession of the ball. If a receiver would have landed inbounds with both feet but is carried or pushed out of bounds while maintaining possession of the ball, pass is complete at the out-of-bounds spot.

On a fourth down pass an incomplete pass results in a loss of down at the line of scrimmage. If a personal foul is committed by the defense prior to the completion of a pass, the penalty is 15 yards from the spot where ball becomes dead.

If a personal foul is committed by the offense prior to the completion of a pass, the penalty is 15 yards from the previous line of scrimmage.

This is from the rule book: Link

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The rules are:

Forward Pass

A forward pass may be touched or caught by any eligible receiver. All members of the defensive team are eligible. Eligible receivers on the offensive team are players on either end of line (other than center, guard, or tackle) or players at least one yard behind the line at the snap. A T-formation quarterback is not eligible to receive a forward pass during a play from scrimmage.

Exception: T-formation quarterback becomes eligible if pass is previously touched by an eligible receiver.

An offensive team may make only one forward pass during each play from scrimmage (Loss of 5 yards).

The passer must be behind his line of scrimmage (Loss of down and five yards, enforced from the spot of pass).

Any eligible offensive player may catch a forward pass. If a pass is touched by one eligible offensive player and touched or caught by a second offensive player, pass completion is legal. Further, all offensive players become eligible once a pass is touched by an eligible receiver or any defensive player.

The rules concerning a forward pass and ineligible receivers:

a. If ball is touched accidentally by an ineligible receiver on or behind his line: loss of five yards.

B. If ineligible receiver is illegally downfield: loss of five yards.

C. If touched or caught (intentionally or accidentally) by ineligible receiver beyond the line: loss of 5 yards.

The player who first controls and continues to maintain control of a pass will be awarded the ball even though his opponent later establishes joint control of the ball.

Any forward pass becomes incomplete and ball is dead if:

a. Pass hits the ground or goes out of bounds.

b. Pass hits the goal post or the crossbar of either team.

A forward pass is complete when a receiver clearly possesses the pass and touches the ground with both feet inbounds while in possession of the ball. If a receiver would have landed inbounds with both feet but is carried or pushed out of bounds while maintaining possession of the ball, pass is complete at the out-of-bounds spot.

On a fourth down pass an incomplete pass results in a loss of down at the line of scrimmage. If a personal foul is committed by the defense prior to the completion of a pass, the penalty is 15 yards from the spot where ball becomes dead.

If a personal foul is committed by the offense prior to the completion of a pass, the penalty is 15 yards from the previous line of scrimmage.

This is from the rule book: Link

The rule seems to support a catch. This was just a bad call, and the scary thing is the right call was overturned. They had a chance to think it over and still got it wrong. I am not one to criticize officiating often. I do not believe they lose games, but I do believe this was a disturbingly bad call.

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If a receiver would have landed inbounds with both feet but is carried or pushed out of bounds while maintaining possession of the ball, pass is complete at the out-of-bounds spot.

That sounds like the force out rule which was omitted this year.

It is - but the part that was changed is only the force out portion - if they are in the air. Here's the changes:

Posted 3 months agoE-mail

New NFL rules for 2008

Associated Press

A number of 2008 playing-rules changes were adopted by NFL owners at the NFL Annual Meeting in late March. Following are the changes, with comments from NFL head coaches and executives:

» Defensive helmet radios: Teams will now be permitted to have one defensive player on the field with a radio in his helmet. This gives the defense the same ability to communicate its signals as the offense.

Under new rules, a player must have both feet in bounds while making a reception, even while being forced out by an opposing player.

» A closer look at the new coach-to-defense system

» Incidental facemasks: The foul for incidental grasp and release of the facemask has been eliminated. Twisting, turning or pulling the facemask will remain a 15-yard personal foul.

» Forceout rule: The forceout rule has been eliminated. A player who receives or intercepts a ball must land with both feet inbounds. This affords the receiver and defender equal opportunity to complete the play.

"We feel that with so many levels of judgment that go into the force-out call it creates a more consistent play when either you get your feet down for a complete pass or you do not," says co-chairman of the NFL Competition Committee Rick McKay.

» Reviewable plays: Instant replay will expand to include field-goal and extra-point attempts as well as illegal forward handoffs. This provides a mechanism for correcting an obvious onfield officiating error.

» Second half coin toss: Clubs will now have the option to defer the opportunity to kick or receive the kickoff to the second half.

"It now gives coaches a third option," says Jeff Fisher, Tennessee Titans head coach and co-chairman of the NFL Competition Committee.

» Muffed snap: It will now be a live ball when a direct snap from center to a player who is in position to receive a hand-to-hand snap goes untouched. It was previously called a false start, but now either team may recover and advance the untouched snap.

» There will be a point of emphasis on a rule this season (although the rule itself has not changed):

Grasping the facemask by all players, including offensive players, will continue to be strictly enforced. Specific attention is to be given to the runner who twists, turns, or pulls the facemask of the defender who is trying to make the tackle.

Runners and tacklers are to be treated identically when this occurs. This action is a personal foul and a 15-yard penalty.

» NFL'S "third-quarterback" rule -- sometimes misunderstood:

Seventeen years ago (1991) the third-quarterback rule was instituted to enable teams to have an emergency quarterback available who was not on the 45-man game-day active roster, since many teams, for strategic purposes, only carried two quarterbacks on their game-day roster.

Everybody thinks they understand the NFL's "third-quarterback" rule. But do they?

The rule states that if a third quarterback is inserted before the fourth quarter, a team's first two quarterbacks cannot be used in the game at any position.

Another aspect of the rule is sometimes misunderstood. It is a coach's decision as to whether a third quarterback will be used.

The active quarterbacks do not have to be injured for a team to use its third quarterback.

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Here is what confuses me...

Despite the technicalities...

He has possession in bounds. So, even though he was down by contact and down out of bounds (both of which should call the play dead), this doesn't matter?

So if he would have run 30 yards, fallen out of bounds, burst in to flames, attacked by killer bees, shot in the stomach with a harpoon, and lost the ball when he hit the ground, it would have been called an incomplete pass?

Focusing on the whole ground causing a fumble is insane. He had possession before any of that happened. It wasn't falling, it was running and then falling.

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To me it was absolutely a catch but sometimes you gotta wonder about the refs. This was a call left open to interpretation based on the rules which to me suck for these situations. What kind of direction do you think officials are given for plays which can interpreted by refs in a marginal fashion such as this? Do they consider the score? Carolina down 17-3 - shortly before halftime - big division game - want viewers to come back for second half - don't flip to another game - blowouts not good for ratings - any of this factor in do you think? You gotta wonder.

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