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FalconMama
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Why do corners give WR's 3-5 yard cushions? Is it because the corner is afraid to get beat deep, a scheme thing or a personal choice?

Let me set a scenario for you.......If the corner plays up...and Jams a receiver lets say Steve Smith, and the Receiver gets off the jam easily.....the corner is going to be off balance and Steve Smith is going to burn him deep EASILY.....also the 3-5 yard cushion gives a corner a little more leeway to read the route, (out, post, streak, slant, cross,etc) it just allows the corner to read the QB, or WR better

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I don't know. But Jaqueline saw one of our corners playing back yesterday, and did a quick lateral pass to the receiver, who then proceeded to get....

nothing. :P

Yeah I know and I'm talking about general football, this is something I see every week with different teams in the NFL and I was wondering why they do that.

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Let me set a scenario for you.......If the corner plays up...and Jams a receiver lets say Steve Smith, and the Receiver gets off the jam easily.....the corner is going to be off balance and Steve Smith is going to burn him deep EASILY.....also the 3-5 yard cushion gives a corner a little more leeway to read the route, (out, post, streak, slant, cross,etc) it just allows the corner to read the QB, or WR better

oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooohhhh thanks

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Why do corners give WR's 3-5 yard cushions? Is it because the corner is afraid to get beat deep, a scheme thing or a personal choice?

The basic premise is to make sure you keep the receiver in front of you. Part of it is in order not to get beat deep, but it's also to give the DB the ability to watch the play develop better and make breaks on the ball. It also helps with run stopping as you have more space to avoid blockers.

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oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooohhhh thanks

Read my post above, also you dont want Chris Houston playing up on a great receiver, because hes still very green behind the ears.....Foxworth could probably play up and still be ok. Rashean Mathis plays up all the time...and always gets beat deep...but also makes tons of plays.....so its the aggressive stance or the bend but dont break stance....yesterday they blew coverage on steve smith 3 or 4 times though...of all people to blow coverage on....

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Why do corners give WR's 3-5 yard cushions? Is it because the corner is afraid to get beat deep, a scheme thing or a personal choice?

Well...I wouldn't call it "being afraid." But, the corner is all ready at a disadvantage.

1. He has to jam the WR

2. Back-pedal

3. Turn out of that back-pedal and defend the deep ball or stop on a dime and defend the short pass. ;)

It's not the easiest position to play..... ;)

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Why do corners give WR's 3-5 yard cushions? Is it because the corner is afraid to get beat deep, a scheme thing or a personal choice?

imo, it's because they don't want to get beat deep. if they played up on them everytime, you'd see WR have a field day catching deep balls. even if you jam him at the line every time, he can get by you with a decent juke move.

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Why do corners give WR's 3-5 yard cushions? Is it because the corner is afraid to get beat deep, a scheme thing or a personal choice?

There are a ton of reasons for it. It gives the corner a little bit more time to read the play and react. It allows a corner to run downhill for shorter routes and running plays (if they jam at the line, they immediately have to turn up field to cover, and then immediately have to turn around if it's a handoff or short route to TE/RB). It allows a corner to backpedal for part of the route allowing him to watch what the offense is doing (a corner jamming at the line cannot backpedal as fast as the WR can run).

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Why do corners give WR's 3-5 yard cushions? Is it because the corner is afraid to get beat deep, a scheme thing or a personal choice?

It depends on what the defensive sceme is. Put it to you this way. Contrary to what a lot of fans think it is not the CB's responsibility to prevent the WR from making every reception. That is imposible. The WR knows what the Offense is doing and the CB has to react to what the O is doing. If the defensive sceme is to stop short to intermediate routes that generally means the Dline is running a stunt, or straight bull rush (going after the QB and not worring about run) or there is a blitz, so the corner will play up and "bump" the WR to know him out of rythme with the QB and take away quick routes (hopefully there will be a sack). If the Defense is in more of a coverage package the CB will play "off" the WR and give up a short 3 - 5 yard pass, keeping the WR in front of him so he can quickly make the tackle. If it is 1st and 20 or second and long generally most DC's will play off on the corners and let them make a short yardage catch because they still have a lot of yards to gain for a first down. If a CB plays up on the WR and the WR gets a clean release (dosen't get jammed by the CB) there is no corner in the world that will be able to cover him. Think of it this way even if the CB is faster than the WR the QB and WR know the route. All the QB has to do is throw to a spot and let the WR run to it. The CB is going to be guessing where the ball is going. This is why it is important for the safeties to read the head and eyes of the QB so to provide over the top help to the CB when the ball is in the air. Generally, most coaches want the CB to be able to cover a WR for 3 - 5 seconds. After that if a ball is caught by a WR it is considered a breakdown by either the dline not getting to the QB or a failure on one of the safeties part.

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Well looks like we have real players making some very good post.

FWIW DB's and especially CB's are very fast runners, and to play this position

the one 40 yd time that you never see posted is, the back pedal times.

If you have a good forward 40 time but do not have a blistering back pedal, you

are just going to get Torched by the WO's

Otherwise you had best be a Killer, cause Safety is the last position you get a shot at.

But do not read too much into that as some DB's are Killers Period.

Lawyer is a good example of that.

Sorry about the terminology, as I do not know what terms are used these days.

Would love to hear some additional comments on this.

For me a quarter century has gone by.

Cheers

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Like others have said, its an issue of schemes.

In the Tampa 2 system, the corners don't usually give any sort of cushion. The defense they run is predicated on disrupting the timing of the routes the receivers run - this is most easily accomplished by giving the WRs a jam at the line. The corners play aggressively on the receivers because they are not responsible for deep coverage - in a Tampa 2, that is the job of the safety. The corners are responsible for short throws to the receivers, and routes in the flats.

In our scheme, we give a cushion because our corners do not necessarily have help over the top. We usually play Milloy up in order to help with the run, and this plays to his strengths. Coleman is responsible for deep help over the top, but when we blitz, he usually picks up a back or tight end. So our corners need some spacing in order to prevent a deep completion.

Undoubtedly, this cushion hurts the corner on short routes, and our secondary does have a tendency to give these routes up. We also get burned alot by deep comeback routes.

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Like others have said, its an issue of schemes.

In the Tampa 2 system, the corners don't usually give any sort of cushion. The defense they run is predicated on disrupting the timing of the routes the receivers run - this is most easily accomplished by giving the WRs a jam at the line. The corners play aggressively on the receivers because they are not responsible for deep coverage - in a Tampa 2, that is the job of the safety. The corners are responsible for short throws to the receivers, and routes in the flats.

In our scheme, we give a cushion because our corners do not necessarily have help over the top. We usually play Milloy up in order to help with the run, and this plays to his strengths. Coleman is responsible for deep help over the top, but when we blitz, he usually picks up a back or tight end. So our corners need some spacing in order to prevent a deep completion.

Undoubtedly, this cushion hurts the corner on short routes, and our secondary does have a tendency to give these routes up. We also get burned alot by deep comeback routes.

wrong NO defensive scheme expects a safety to cover T.O or R.Moss deep

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It depends on what the defensive sceme is. Put it to you this way. Contrary to what a lot of fans think it is not the CB's responsibility to prevent the WR from making every reception. That is imposible. The WR knows what the Offense is doing and the CB has to react to what the O is doing. If the defensive sceme is to stop short to intermediate routes that generally means the Dline is running a stunt, or straight bull rush (going after the QB and not worring about run) or there is a blitz, so the corner will play up and "bump" the WR to know him out of rythme with the QB and take away quick routes (hopefully there will be a sack). If the Defense is in more of a coverage package the CB will play "off" the WR and give up a short 3 - 5 yard pass, keeping the WR in front of him so he can quickly make the tackle. If it is 1st and 20 or second and long generally most DC's will play off on the corners and let them make a short yardage catch because they still have a lot of yards to gain for a first down. If a CB plays up on the WR and the WR gets a clean release (dosen't get jammed by the CB) there is no corner in the world that will be able to cover him. Think of it this way even if the CB is faster than the WR the QB and WR know the route. All the QB has to do is throw to a spot and let the WR run to it. The CB is going to be guessing where the ball is going. This is why it is important for the safeties to read the head and eyes of the QB so to provide over the top help to the CB when the ball is in the air. Generally, most coaches want the CB to be able to cover a WR for 3 - 5 seconds. After that if a ball is caught by a WR it is considered a breakdown by either the dline not getting to the QB or a failure on one of the safeties part.

Which is why film study is so important. If the corner or any defensive player for that matter studies enough film to be able to pick up on tendencies of the opposing offense and its players, then the advantage the offense has of knowing what they are doing and where they are going is negated to a certain extent.

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It has to do with scheme a lot of times, But it also has to do with respect for the receivers ability to avoid being jammed or just be plain fast.

For instance say your in a Cover 3 Zone Scheme. there are a lot of different ways you can get three guys at the top.

If one safety is playing the middle, you may have both outside corners playing deep outside zones. The corners in this instance may play really far off because their zone responsibilities are to cover deep.

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