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Graduate School is Rapidly Becoming the New Requirement


womfalcs3
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It's not yet, but we're rapidly heading towards that state.

A great percentage of graduates are heading back to school to earn higher degrees. That percentage keeps increasing. That's a good thing, since that's where much of the research from which the global community benefits comes. In order for people to keep up the competition in the work force, they will have to start looking into higher education.

For example, starting in 2010, in order to become a licensed engineer, you must take 30 more hours of courses on top of your degree requirements and other tests/experience requirements already in place. They don't require a higher degree, but they're pushing you to pursue a Master's since such degree requires 30 hours.

What about 40 years from now?

I think we're going to see the majority of graduates pursue higher degrees in several decades from now. Making it hard to compete with them in the work force if you do not have such educational background.

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Well I a not sure if this is true or not, it seems to be a trend. As society moves away from labor and towards a white collar work force. The level of competition for a given white collar position has and will continue to increase. Its the nature of competition.

As far as an engineer- the 30 extra credit hours theory seems that may be state specific. I can't think of many licenses that are "national" most licenses are state issued.

But I feel most comfortable knowing that an engineer who designs the roads, bldgs, and bridges I frequent has the most current and practical education.

Professions- have required post graduate degrees for sometime now.

There are 3 true professions- law, medicine, clergy.

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40 years ago (maybe less), a college degree almost guaranteed job security of some kind. If you lost your job, and had a degree, you were able to find another with relative ease.

Today, when the majority of people consider college the next step after high-school (I do not know one person from my graduating class in HS that didn't go to college), the way to stand out in the job market is a Grad degree.

When people cite examples of millionaires without college experience (or without a college degree), this is the exception, not the norm.

There is no sure fire way to become a millionaire, but I doubt anyone would argue that if you placed a bet on a 22 year old college grad vs. a 22 year old college drop out, that every single person would bet on the college grad becoming a millionaire over the other. Same goes for a 24-year-old Graduate degree vs. a 24-year-old undergrad degree. Doesn't mean that is the only way, but it is the best.

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40 years ago (maybe less), a college degree almost guaranteed job security of some kind. If you lost your job, and had a degree, you were able to find another with relative ease.

Today, when the majority of people consider college the next step after high-school (I do not know one person from my graduating class in HS that didn't go to college), the way to stand out in the job market is a Grad degree.

When people cite examples of millionaires without college experience (or without a college degree), this is the exception, not the norm.

There is no sure fire way to become a millionaire, but I doubt anyone would argue that if you placed a bet on a 22 year old college grad vs. a 22 year old college drop out, that every single person would bet on the college grad becoming a millionaire over the other. Same goes for a 24-year-old Graduate degree vs. a 24-year-old undergrad degree. Doesn't mean that is the only way, but it is the best.

Yup.

None of my grandparents have college degrees. My parents do, but not all their siblings do (In fact, most of my Dad's brothers didn't go to college).

A lot has changed since those times. Now everybody is going for post-high school education. One needs/will need to have something more.

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Ive been thinking about going to grad school. I dont know where I would get the money, or what I would study, but I cant get a decent job with my BA. The job I have now doesnt even require a college degree.

a lot of times jobs will pay for your education.

I would go back to your college career counseling and discuss those opportunities.

I had a good friend who signed a deal with Proctor & Gamble right out of undergrad that basically paid for her Grad School at Ohio State, with the condition she had to work for P&G for 4 years after Grad school. What a deal.

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There is no sure fire way to become a millionaire, but I doubt anyone would argue that if you placed a bet on a 22 year old college grad vs. a 22 year old college drop out, that every single person would bet on the college grad becoming a millionaire over the other.

I disagree strongly, provided the two have the same intellectual capacity. Degrees are only good for for selling yourself into wage slavery. Wage slaves rarely become millionaires.

10 Wealthiest Americans (according to Forbes).

1. Bill Gates - Drop Out

2. Warren Buffet - Masters Degree

3. Paul Allen - Drop Out

4-8. Walton Family Members - Trust Fund Babies

9. Michael Dell - Drop Out

10. Larry Ellison - Drop Out

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I disagree strongly, provided the two have the same intellectual capacity. Degrees are only good for for selling yourself into wage slavery. Wage slaves rarely become millionaires.

10 Wealthiest Americans (according to Forbes).

1. Bill Gates - Drop Out

2. Warren Buffet - Masters Degree

3. Paul Allen - Drop Out

4-8. Walton Family Members - Trust Fund Babies

9. Michael Dell - Drop Out

10. Larry Ellison - Drop Out

I strongly disagree. What a poor example. All 4 of the bold "Drop Outs" are in the technical industry. In addition, they all planned on going to college, but dropped out due to an opportunity. Rather good colleges, might I add. We may never see a boom of wealth the way we did with computers and the internet again.

If you want to hold out on the off-chance that we have the largest economical invention in history again and skip college, be my guest. But you will never, ever hear one intelligent person say it is smarter to chance it and not go to college.

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I strongly disagree. What a poor example. All 4 of the bold "Drop Outs" are in the technical industry. In addition, they all planned on going to college, but dropped out due to an opportunity. Rather good colleges, might I add. We may never see a boom of wealth the way we did with computers and the internet again.

If you want to hold out on the off-chance that we have the largest economical invention in history again and skip college, be my guest. But you will never, ever hear one intelligent person say it is smarter to chance it and not go to college.

I'm certainly not advising someone to "skip college." Partying and getting laid are fun!

I'm merely stating facts, the overwhelming majority of self-made multi-millionaires become so through entrepreneurial pursuits, not wage slavery.

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I'm certainly not advising someone to "skip college." Partying and getting laid are fun!

I'm merely stating facts, the overwhelming majority of self-made multi-millionaires become so through entrepreneurial pursuits, not wage slavery.

But you are arguing that a degree = wage slavery. I am willing to bet the percentages of successful entrepreneurs that have a degree far outweigh those without. Wage slavery is defined by NOT having a degree, not the other way around.

A college degree can not guarantee success, and who you know generally outweighs what you know, but the rare success stories are the exception, not the rule.

Degree = salary. Diploma = hourly wages.

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But you are arguing that a degree = wage slavery. I am willing to bet the percentages of successful entrepreneurs that have a degree far outweigh those without. Wage slavery is defined by NOT having a degree, not the other way around.

A college degree can not guarantee success, and who you know generally outweighs what you know, but the rare success stories are the exception, not the rule.

Degree = salary. Diploma = hourly wages.

No, I said, a degree is really only useful when selling yourself into wage slavery or domestic servitude. 70% of millionaires are entrepreneurs of some sort, that's according to the research done in the 'Millionaire Next Door'.

As far as entrepreneurs with degrees verses ones without, the research supports my point, as the rate of success within the two groups barely differs.

Again, degrees are good for qualifying yourself when trading your time for money. Selling your time for money is a VERY difficult approach to wealth, as statistically time-sellers are in the extreme minority of self-made millionaires.

I would certainly advise one to attend college, if anything, for the life experience and especially if you're serious about becoming a lifetime domesticated servant.

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I cant get a decent job with my BA. The job I have now doesnt even require a college degree.

same here. I graduated in May from UGA with a very good GPA and couldn't find a job anywhere. I stayed with my on campus job through the summer when my lease ran out, then had to move back to my parents' house. I've given up on looking for now. Moving out west for the winter to work and ski, maybe when I get back the job market will be better. Or I might just stay out there. One thing I won't be doing is grad school. Too expensive and kind of pointless for me since I'm not even sure I want to work in the field of my undergrad degree yet.

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No, I said, a degree is really only useful when selling yourself into wage slavery or domestic servitude. 70% of millionaires are entrepreneurs of some sort, that's according to the research done in the 'Millionaire Next Door'.

As far as entrepreneurs with degrees verses ones without, the research supports my point, as the rate of success within the two groups barely differs.

Again, degrees are good for qualifying yourself when trading your time for money. Selling your time for money is a VERY difficult approach to wealth, as statically time-sellers are in the extreme minority of self-made millionaires.

I would certainly advise one to attend college, if anything, for the life experience and especially if you're serious about becoming a lifetime domesticated servant.

LOL. Ok, lets try this again......

You are arguing that millionaires/billionaires are generally entrepreneurs (which is true). But I STRONGLY disagree that a college degree is in any way, shape, or form related to "wage slavery" or "domestic servitude". You have done nothing to support that point.

You can keep pointing out the Bill Gates or Michael Dell's of the world, but they are market innovators. For every non-degree holding individual that is a millionaire, I will show you a million non-degree holding individuals that bring home 5 figure incomes.

I don't understand how anyone could argue against it. There are three categories in this argument: college grad, non-college grad, and entrepreneurs. Outside of the entrepreneurial category, the college grad will make significantly more money than the non-college grad, hands down. I hope you can agree thus far (otherwise I am just wasting time).

The entrepreneurial category is built on chances. Bill Gates took a chance dropping out of Harvard. Larry Ellison dropped out of the University of Chicago to join the same movement in California. But if we look at the economic times right now, there are an equal number, if not more, losing everything because of a failed chance. What a college degree provides, outside of knowledge necessary for a particular field, is job security outside of these 'chances'. Wealth is built on risks, but it is the smart ones who take calculated risks, and i would bet my bottom dollar that somewhere along the line, the acquired skills necessary to make a calculated risk comes from a college education.

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I'm in my first year of engineering right now and I was planning on getting to work as soon as my four years were up, but the more I talk to people the more it makes me think that it would be a bad decision to not go to grad school. Right now my main focus is just graduating. I think I'll worry about grad school or specializing later on.

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There is no substitute for experience, but other than that, all else equal a candidate with higher education will usually get the nod.

Well said.

It differ from industry to industry, but in the 4 years it takes to get a degree, you jump much further up the average companies scale than if you started out of HS and tried to move up through the company over the same 4 years.

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I work in the financial sector and my observation is that employers in my sector put more emphasis on certifications than advanced degrees. Some of the people at my firm have degrees from colleges that I've never heard of (probably diploma mills). But when we interview new applications for vacant positons the three letters that impress us the most are CPA. Once you're a CPA you are a god around here.

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I disagree strongly, provided the two have the same intellectual capacity. Degrees are only good for for selling yourself into wage slavery. Wage slaves rarely become millionaires.

10 Wealthiest Americans (according to Forbes).

1. Bill Gates - Drop Out

2. Warren Buffet - Masters Degree

3. Paul Allen - Drop Out

4-8. Walton Family Members - Trust Fund Babies

9. Michael Dell - Drop Out

10. Larry Ellison - Drop Out

You are wrong in that assertion. These people took big risks, and those risks paid off. Most people who take such risks don't get rewarded in the end.

That's like saying playing the lottery is a sure win just because 5,000 people last year won 100,000 Dollars or more playing, while neglecting the 10's of millions of others who failed at it. Risks.

The safest way to earn a good income is to get a good education that is useful in your future profession.

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I'm in my first year of engineering right now and I was planning on getting to work as soon as my four years were up, but the more I talk to people the more it makes me think that it would be a bad decision to not go to grad school. Right now my main focus is just graduating. I think I'll worry about grad school or specializing later on.

Yeah. Don't worry about it right now. Just enjoy the 4 years.

If you speak with professors and engineers who already employed, you'll hear how beneficial graduate school is. In the foreseeable future, B.S. degrees will be as common as high school diplomas were 20 years ago. One will have to go farther to differentiate themselves.

I would say 20% of my engineering class has gone to graduate school. That is a high percentage.

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LOL. Ok, lets try this again......

I understand your social programming but will enlighten you anyway.

You are arguing that millionaires/billionaires are generally entrepreneurs (which is true). But I STRONGLY disagree that a college degree is in any way, shape, or form related to "wage slavery" or "domestic servitude". You have done nothing to support that point.

I am a NOT equating a degree with wage slavery, I am equating selling your time with wage slavery. Degrees, for the most part, are only useful when you're attempting to sell your time (getting a job). There are exceptions though, like when you're marketing professional services.

You can keep pointing out the Bill Gates or Michael Dell's of the world, but they are market innovators. For every non-degree holding individual that is a millionaire, I will show you a million non-degree holding individuals that bring home 5 figure incomes.

I do? I only mentioned those billionaires in my initial post. I would most certainly agree with your last statement.

I don't understand how anyone could argue against it. There are three categories in this argument: college grad, non-college grad, and entrepreneurs.

No, my initial response was specifically about "millionaires", of which, the majority are entrepreneurs of some sort, which we agree on. I'm arguing that the research shows that a degree isn't much of a factor in determining an entrepreneur's success. Your report card is your balance sheet.

Outside of the entrepreneurial category, the college grad will make significantly more money than the non-college grad, hands down. I hope you can agree thus far (otherwise I am just wasting time).

Agreed.

Time sellers with a college degree will certainly make much more than time sellers with no degree.

The entrepreneurial category is built on chances. Bill Gates took a chance dropping out of Harvard. Larry Ellison dropped out of the University of Chicago to join the same movement in California. But if we look at the economic times right now, there are an equal number, if not more, losing everything because of a failed chance. What a college degree provides, outside of knowledge necessary for a particular field, is job security outside of these 'chances'. Wealth is built on risks, but it is the smart ones who take calculated risks, and i would bet my bottom dollar that somewhere along the line, the acquired skills necessary to make a calculated risk comes from a college education.

Look, there is nothing wrong with selling your time, just don't expect to become financially free.

There are only so many hours in a day, therefore, you have very limited time to sell. That's why its so difficult to become a millionaire selling time.

Again, I would most certainly advise people to attend college because virtually everyone has to sell their time at some point in their life.

There are always risks involved with profit. The average millionaire has three failed business under their belt and filed for bankruptcy twice.

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