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The Color of the man


edZep
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His color won't matter to most voters, but it will be an indirect factor. There are a few racists out there who will vote against him because he is black. However, there are a lot of people out there who will vote for him simply because he is black. A few black people will not vote for Obama because they think he's not black enough. There's another contingency who will vote for him because they think it will bring racial harmony. Probably all of this will result in a few net votes for Obama.

Here's where it becomes an indirect factor. All of the people previously mentioned will vote for the next president based on race. They have their minds made up already. Had another white male been the Democratic nominee most of these people would have cast their vote based on actual issues and other factors. Therefore, Obama's race makes the issues less important because there are fewer voters who will vote based on issues. Both McCain and Obama know Obama's race will cause certain people to vote one way or the other, so there's no need for either to pander to such voters.

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It would be ignorant to say that people are not voting for or against him because of his race, or 1/2 his race I should say.

I think his race is an issue for some really, really dumb people out there. I stress the the word some. I don't think it will cost or win him the election, but it is in some voters minds no doubt.

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His color won't matter to most voters, but it will be an indirect factor. There are a few racists out there who will vote against him because he is black. However, there are a lot of people out there who will vote for him simply because he is black. A few black people will not vote for Obama because they think he's not black enough. There's another contingency who will vote for him because they think it will bring racial harmony. Probably all of this will result in a few net votes for Obama.

Here's where it becomes an indirect factor. All of the people previously mentioned will vote for the next president based on race. They have their minds made up already. Had another white male been the Democratic nominee most of these people would have cast their vote based on actual issues and other factors. Therefore, Obama's race makes the issues less important because there are fewer voters who will vote based on issues. Both McCain and Obama know Obama's race will cause certain people to vote one way or the other, so there's no need for either to pander to such voters.

I agree. I am a democrat and would have voted for whomever was nominated, except may Kucinich...he gives me the creeps.

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I agree. I am a democrat and would have voted for whomever was nominated, except may Kucinich...he gives me the creeps.

Co-sign..........The White House desperately needs fumigating after 8 years of Bush and Cheney. Virtually any Democrat would have gotten my vote.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I can't speak for anyone else, but I'm for Obama more for the issues than anything else, including party and race. If it was solely about race, McCain could have selected Alan Keys and had this thing wrapped up last night. I was actually on the fence until McCain veered right. I lost respect for him because I felt that his centrist record would have easily won the election, but he decided to prove how conservative he really is and take a page out of the GOP "win by any means" playbook. And now that he's got the "conservative base" fired up again, he's talking about "reaching across the aisle" when he's attacking the people sitting there.

Thanks, Zep, for the bump.

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I can't speak for anyone else, but I'm for Obama more for the issues than anything else, including party and race. If it was solely about race, McCain could have selected Alan Keys and had this thing wrapped up last night. I was actually on the fence until McCain veered right. I lost respect for him because I felt that his centrist record would have easily won the election, but he decided to prove how conservative he really is and take a page out of the GOP "win by any means" playbook. And now that he's got the "conservative base" fired up again, he's talking about "reaching across the aisle" when he's attacking the people sitting there.

Thanks, Zep, for the bump.

Quite welcome.

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If Obama gets elected, or loses, the election will it be because he is a Black man.

What does that say about our society ?

Color should not matter,but I am afraid that this election is more about the color of the man than anything else.

It will not be because of his race. Your fears are unfounded.
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If he gets elected, I don't believe it will happen because he's (half) black since people of African percent only account for about 13% of the U.S. population. That's far too small to get him elected, the only reason he's gotten this far is because there are white people out there that are willing to vote for him...

But if he doesn't get elected, I believe it will be, at least partially, because he is (half) black. People always feel comfortable with what they know and most of America know and have closer relationships with people that look more like McCain then they do Obama. They might say they'd vote for Obama in a poll or something like that for fear of being labeled a racist, but when they're in that booth and no one is looking I bet there will be a lot of second guessing, even if they end up voting for Obama anyway...

The one thing that Obama does have going for him is that it is the younger portion of white America this is voting for him, and these are youth that had opportunities to grow up and have much closer relationships with black people then their parents and grandparents. Keep in mind that over 40% of the U.S. population is under 30. They are much less likely to see the color of his skin as a detriment or a factor at all...

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The more I see the more I fear .
I doubt very seriously that you are able to see the true reasons that someone votes as they do. Looking at someone, or a group, and assuming that you know why they are doing something is a road to misery. Instead of looking at millions of people and tying them together by race and voter behaviour, why not consider them millions of individual Americans, each with their own ideas, preferences and reasons for voting. You'll be much more accurate.
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If he gets elected, I don't believe it will happen because he's (half) black since people of African percent only account for about 13% of the U.S. population. That's far too small to get him elected, the only reason he's gotten this far is because there are white people out there that are willing to vote for him...

But if he doesn't get elected, I believe it will be, at least partially, because he is (half) black. People always feel comfortable with what they know and most of America know and have closer relationships with people that look more like McCain then they do Obama. They might say they'd vote for Obama in a poll or something like that for fear of being labeled a racist, but when they're in that booth and no one is looking I bet there will be a lot of second guessing, even if they end up voting for Obama anyway...

The one thing that Obama does have going for him is that it is the younger portion of white America this is voting for him, and these are youth that had opportunities to grow up and have much closer relationships with black people then their parents and grandparents. Keep in mind that over 40% of the U.S. population is under 30. They are much less likely to see the color of his skin as a detriment or a factor at all...

The youth vote has always been much more liberal, therefore he would have had this vote regardless of color. Al Gore, John Kerry, they all carried a large percentage of the youth vote.

If race is an issue, it will be found on the fringes of whites and blacks.

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I doubt very seriously that you are able to see the true reasons that someone votes as they do. Looking at someone, or a group, and assuming that you know why they are doing something is a road to misery. Instead of looking at millions of people and tying them together by race and voter behaviour, why not consider them millions of individual Americans, each with their own ideas, preferences and reasons for voting. You'll be much more accurate.

If people would think as individuals I would see your point.

I am in a position to hear what a lot of different "individuals think".

From what I have seen and heard many people follow their crowd .

No independant thinkers.

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If people would think as individuals I would see your point.

I am in a position to hear what a lot of different "individuals think".

From what I have seen and heard many people follow their crowd .

No independant thinkers.

How do you know they don't think as individuals...based on who they hang out with?

The answer is that you do not know. Pretending that you do puts words and ideas into people's heads that may or may not be there. That is the height of ignorance and condescension.

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