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The real truth behind the push for domestic drilling...


Tetsujin-28
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boughtbybigoil.com

GOP Follows the Money... All the Way to Big Oil

Exxon Mobil announced a staggering $11.7 billion in second quarter profits today, the largest quarterly profits of any corporation in history, and the latest in a string of record-shattering profit announcements from the industry. Record-high oil prices may be squeezing Americans at the pump, but it's obviously good business for the oil companies. Less obvious, but just as harmful to consumers, is just what good business it is for the Republican Party.

Over the past few years, Republicans in Congress and the oil companies have assembled a mutually beneficial money machine. Big Oil pumps millions into the campaign coffers of Republican Senators. Those Senators shower the industry with billions in big tax breaks. Big Oil makes record profits, and in turn, sends millions more back into Republican campaigns. Wash, Rinse, Repeat. Everyone wins except for average Americans who find themselves paying record high gas prices and wondering why Washington can't seem to do anything about it.

Since taking control of the Senate by a narrow one-vote margin in January of 2007, Democrats have tried repeatedly to break the oil industry's stranglehold on public policy and have repeatedly been stymied by Republican filibusters. For example, last June, Democrats tried to pass legislation rolling back billions in tax breaks President Bush and the Republican Congress had given to the oil companies, but couldn't find enough Republicans to join them to reach the 60-vote threshold to break a filibuster. Then in December, Democrats tried again to repeal $13 billion in special oil and gas industry tax breaks to fund tax incentives for renewable energy and again were stopped by a Republican filibuster.

Republicans have been loudly bemoaning high gas prices as of late, but, not surprisingly, the only proposals they offer are the same ones backed by the oil companies. And then when they have a chance to actually lower the price of gas, they revert to their same old ways. Last Friday, Democrats in the Senate brought up a bill to lower gas prices by cracking down on oil speculators -- who experts say have needlessly driven up the price of oil -- and could only muster 50 votes, with nearly every Republican Senator voting to stop the bill from advancing.

The Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee launched a new website today, www.BoughtByBigOil.com, with more on how each Republican Senator running for re-election has voted to back the oil companies while handsomely profiting from their largesse. Republican Senators with long histories of backing Big Oil will be sending up plenty of smokescreens to disguise their records during the 95 days left between now and the election, but for voters who want to know where they really stand, the old axiom still applies: Follow the money.

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If Clinton would've signed into legistration offshore drilling, ANWAR, and Colorado Shale, in 96', we would have 89 cent gas right now, 100,000 more American jobs, an abundance of oil in the 100 billion barrel range that we would be selling to China, Japan, and the likes. There would be no national debt, nor no current war that we are in right now...the response from democrats? It will take 10 years to get that oil...96' + 10' = 06'...and their solution is?... :lol:

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If Clinton would've signed into legistration offshore drilling, ANWAR, and Colorado Shale, in 96', we would have 89 cent gas right now, 100,000 more American jobs, an abundance of oil in the 100 billion barrel range that we would be selling to China, Japan, and the likes. There would be no national debt, nor no current war that we are in right now...the response from democrats? It will take 10 years to get that oil...96' + 10' = 06'...and their solution is?... :lol:

HOLY CHIT!!!

I actually find myself agreeing with a post by WTF!

**** is surely about to freeze over .......

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If Clinton would've signed into legistration offshore drilling, ANWAR, and Colorado Shale, in 96', we would have 89 cent gas right now, 100,000 more American jobs, an abundance of oil in the 100 billion barrel range that we would be selling to China, Japan, and the likes. There would be no national debt, nor no current war that we are in right now...the response from democrats? It will take 10 years to get that oil...96' + 10' = 06'...and their solution is?... :lol:

Haha riiighhht. 89 cent gas? Keep dreaming.

There isn't enough oil in ANWAR to do anything, and this whole oil shale thing is a complete joke. I used to live in colorado. Theyve been talking about the oil shale there for years and years. Why did they never do anything about it? Because its way more expensive to pull up and refine than normal oil. You won't ever see 89 cent gas refined from oil shale. If we tap out all of our shale gas might go down a little, but it will never be that much cheaper and certainly wont fix anything long term.

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Haha riiighhht. 89 cent gas? Keep dreaming.

There isn't enough oil in ANWAR to do anything, and this whole oil shale thing is a complete joke. I used to live in colorado. Theyve been talking about the oil shale there for years and years. Why did they never do anything about it? Because its way more expensive to pull up and refine than normal oil. You won't ever see 89 cent gas refined from oil shale. If we tap out all of our shale gas might go down a little, but it will never be that much cheaper and certainly wont fix anything long term.

Hey we had $0.89 gas back in '96. Come on let's get there again!

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Haha riiighhht. 89 cent gas? Keep dreaming.

There isn't enough oil in ANWAR to do anything, and this whole oil shale thing is a complete joke. I used to live in colorado. Theyve been talking about the oil shale there for years and years. Why did they never do anything about it? Because its way more expensive to pull up and refine than normal oil. You won't ever see 89 cent gas refined from oil shale. If we tap out all of our shale gas might go down a little, but it will never be that much cheaper and certainly wont fix anything long term.

According to Wikipedia, that's not correct. I don't know a ton about shale. Here's what they say...

During the early 20th century, the crude oil industry expanded. Since then, the various attempts to develop oil shale deposits have been successful only when the cost of shale oil production in a given region was less than the price of crude oil or its other substitutes.[53] According to a survey conducted by the RAND Corporation, the cost of producing a barrel of oil at a surface retorting complex in the United States (comprising a mine, retorting plant, upgrading plant, supporting utilities, and spent shale reclamation), would be between US$70–95 ($440–600/m3, adjusted to 2005 values). This estimate considers varying levels of kerogen quality and extraction efficiency. In order for the operation to be profitable, the price of crude oil would need to remain above these levels. The analysis also discusses the expectation that processing costs would drop after the complex was established. The hypothetical unit would see a cost reduction of 35–70% after its first 500 million barrels (79×106 m3) were produced. Assuming an increase in output of 25 thousand barrels per day (4.0×103 m3/d) during each year after the start of commercial production, the costs would then be expected to decline to $35–48 per barrel ($220–300/m3) within 12 years. After achieving the milestone of 1 billion barrels (160×106 m3), its costs would decline further to $30–40 per barrel ($190–250/m3).[54][55] A comparison of the proposed US oil shale industry to the Alberta tar sands industry has been drawn (the latter enterprise generated over one million barrels of oil per day in late 2007), stating that "the first-generation facility is the hardest, both technically and economically".[56][57]

Of course, my real complaint is that I want us off of oil completelyin the consumer market, and foriegn oil as soon as possible. Shale may be a temporary solution, but technology must play a role in getting us off of fossil fuels.

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Per the Public Citizen, Big Oil is not drilling on the leases they already have to keep from paying royalties to US taxpayers

July 30, 2008

Oil Companies Escape Billions in Royalty Payments to Americans; Drilling Expansion Will Enrich U.S. and Foreign Corporate Freeloaders

Statement of Tyson Slocum, Director, Public Citizen’s Energy Program

A bureaucratic oversight has allowed 24 oil companies to avoid more than $1.3 billion in royalties for the privilege of extracting oil and natural gas from U.S. territory in the Gulf of Mexico - with foreign companies responsible for 55 percent of that total. But this $1.3 billion in forgone royalties pales in comparison to the $60 billion that Americans stand to lose in royalty revenue over the life of these leases. And if Congress repeals the moratorium on Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) drilling that has existed since 1982, these freeloading oil companies will be eligible to bid on new leases, providing them with more record profits while American families are left holding the bag. These 24 companies have posted a combined $365 billion in profits since 2006.

The list of the specific companies comes from a February 2008 U.S. Department of Interior memo recently obtained by Public Citizen. Four of the 24 companies (BP, Marathon, Shell and Walter Oil & Gas) signed voluntary agreements to pay royalties going forward, but they will not be required to pay the more than $200 million taxpayers have been denied on production that already has occurred.

The U.S. Senate is currently considering amendments to the Stop Excessive Energy Speculation Act of 2008 (S. 3268) that would repeal the congressional ban on offshore drilling. The U.S. House of Representatives is also considering measures in the Deep Ocean Energy Resources Act of 2008 (H.R. 6108) that would open up the OCS to new drilling. However, allowing new drilling in these areas will not significantly lower gasoline prices. According to a U.S. Department of Energy report, opening all areas off the coast of the Atlantic, Pacific and the Gulf of Mexico to new drilling "would not have a significant impact on domestic crude oil and natural gas production or prices before 2030." And new areas were opened for drilling in December 2006, when Congress passed the Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act (Public Law 109-432), which authorized leasing 8.3 million acres in the Gulf of Mexico, 70 percent of which had been previously been protected under congressional moratoria.

It is irresponsible to allow companies that escaped the payment of potentially more than $60 billion in royalties because of a loophole to get access to more leases. There is legislative precedent to force companies to pay their fair share. The House passed a measure in January 2007 that would forbid oil companies from being awarded any new leases unless they renegotiate non-royalty leases from 1998 and 1999. President Bush opposed this part of the legislation, and the Senate has yet to adopt it. The U.S. is the third-largest producer of oil in the world, and 31 percent of that production comes from land owned by the federal government.

It should not come as a surprise that much of the impetus for opening the OCS comes from an expensive advertising campaign financed by Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich’s American Solutions for Winning the Future. When Gingrich was speaker, Congress passed the Deep Water Royalty Relief Act of 1995. It turned out to be an even bigger favor than Congress had intended.

Because of a bureaucratic oversight by the Department of Interior during the implementation of the act, oil companies that secured leases in 1998 and 1999 were exempted from royalties, regardless of the prevailing market price of oil. This stands in stark contrast to other, similar leases, which require the payment of royalties if the price of oil exceeds a certain threshold. The day the bill was signed in November 1995, West Texas Intermediate oil was trading at $18.28/barrel. With oil now trading nearly 600 percent higher at more than $120/barrel, these companies have been and will be extracting very valuable energy from public land without paying any royalties to American taxpayers.

In addition, there is widespread mismanagement of the royalty program that allows oil companies to underpay royalties, resulting in Americans being cheated out of hundreds of millions of dollars. Unless that is fixed, expansion of OCS development will also unfairly enrich oil companies, most of which are foreign. A former top auditor at the Department of Interior testified under oath in March 2007 that his superiors limited his ability to collect royalties from oil companies that were owed to the American people. In 2007, a jury in a case filed under the False Claims Act found that Kerr-McGee (now Anadarko), one of the holders of the no-royalty leases from 1998 and 1999, deliberately underpaid more than $7.5 million in royalties.

The 24 companies that have already been extracting oil and natural gas from the Gulf of Mexico royalty-free and have thereby underpaid $1.3 billion in royalties are Anadarko / Kerr-McGee (U.S.); ATP (U.S.); BHP Billiton (Australia); BP (U.K.); Carlyle/Riverstone (U.S.); Chevron (U.S.); Devon (U.S.); Encana (Canada); ENI (Italy); Howell Group, Ltd (U.S.); Marathon (U.S.); Marubeni (Japan); Newfield Exploration (U.S.); Nexen (Canada); Nippon Oil (Japan); Noble Corp (Cayman Islands); Occidental (U.S.); Petrobras (Brazil); Pioneer Natural Resources (U.S.); Plains Exploration (U.S.); Shell (Netherlands); Sojitz Corp (Japan); TotalFinaElf (France);Walter Oil & Gas (U.S.).

Additionally, the following 25 companies have yet to produce on these 1998 and 1999 leases but will produce royalty-free energy in the future: Callon Petroleum (U.S.); Cobalt International Energy (U.S. firms Carlyle/Riverstone and Goldman Sachs are equity partners); El Paso Corp (U.S.); Energy Partners Ltd. (U.S.); Helix Energy Solutions (U.S.); Energy XXI (U.S.); EOG Resources (U.S.); ExxonMobil (U.S.); Helis Oil & Gas, Houston Energy and Ridgewood Energy (U.S.); Hess Corp (U.S.); Maersk Oil (Denmark); Mitsui (Japan); Murphy Oil (U.S); Noble Energy, Inc./Samson Investment Co. (U.S); Petsec Energy Ltd.(Australia); Repsol (Spain); Revus Energy (Norway); Red Willow Production (U.S.); Statoil (Norway); Stephens Production Co. (U.S.); Tana Exploration (U.S.); Teikoku Oil (Japan); Transocean (U.S.); W & T Offshore (U.S.); Woodside Energy (U.S.).

To see a breakdown of the forgone royalties, go to http://www.citizen.org/documents/OCS.pdf.

To read the Department of Interior memo obtained by Public Citizen, go to http://www.citizen.org/documents/AlfredLetter.pdf.Visit My Website.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Oil leases

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Of course, the real problem is that McCain wants to drill in the OCS, which is a really stupid idea, and Obama wants to release a crapload of oil out of the strategic reserve while taxing so-called "windfall profits" (whatever the **** that is), which is an even dumber idea.

In other words, both candidates want to do just enough to buy your votes (or at least SAY just enough to buy your votes), while only making the problem worse. Both candidates are lying to you.

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I used to be all for drilling, but now every time I hear some far right whacko talk about outrageous claims I get this gut feeling its all a giant hoax.

This has never been about getting americans cheaper gas prices. Its been about using fear to let them get what they want for their friends in the oil business.

Honestly, it is starting to make me sick how much fear mongering has been going on about our oil supply getting cut off or gas rising to 10-15 dollars a gallon. Its seriously become the global warming of the far right.

2 years ago republicans were freaking out because people in the far left were going "OMG! the world is going to end tomorrow and everything is going to freeze over!"

Today those same republicans are going "OMG! We are going to get cut off by those soulless muslims in the middle east and the world will end!"

I see no difference.

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I used to be all for drilling, but now every time I hear some far right whacko talk about outrageous claims I get this gut feeling its all a giant hoax.

This has never been about getting americans cheaper gas prices. Its been about using fear to let them get what they want for their friends in the oil business.

Honestly, it is starting to make me sick how much fear mongering has been going on about our oil supply getting cut off or gas rising to 10-15 dollars a gallon. Its seriously become the global warming of the far right.

2 years ago republicans were freaking out because people in the far left were going "OMG! the world is going to end tomorrow and everything is going to freeze over!"

Today those same republicans are going "OMG! We are going to get cut off by those soulless muslims in the middle east and the world will end!"

I see no difference.

Good post. I wish that someone would actually call the far right on this domestic drilling crap just like they call the left on the global warming issue.
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Good post. I wish that someone would actually call the far right on this domestic drilling crap just like they call the left on the global warming issue.

I think they are being called on it (and will continue to be).

The problem is that the "other side" who would be calling them on it are lying themselves. It's sad, really. Probably the most important national security issue of our day and it's being used as a political football, with neither side getting it right.

We need President McBoma (no drilling in the OCS, no use of the SOR, no "windfall profits" tax, reduce or eliminate oil subsidies and give tax breaks to renewable energy exploration and development). Unfortunately, both of them are so badly wrong on such very important issues that I don't see much hope. The tax structure itself (where politicans can use the tax code to buy votes) is the real problem, and both of our candidates are playing the system.

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Oil will be a part of our economy for a long time, even when alternatives take hold and provide additional choices in the marketplace. Therefore, like any product, it makes sense to have a stable supply of key raw materials. We don't have that with oil, and it makes all the sense in the world to position ourselves with domestic supplies, regardless of pricing issues. We're also leaving untapped thousands of job opportunities in the energy sector for no other reason than bogus regulations that contribute to the pricing issue by creating false scarcity.

This is a macro economic issue that goes beyond the politics of the day. It always has, but it's now again getting a lot of attention.

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Of course, the real problem is that McCain wants to drill in the OCS, which is a really stupid idea, and Obama wants to release a crapload of oil out of the strategic reserve while taxing so-called "windfall profits" (whatever the **** that is), which is an even dumber idea.

In other words, both candidates want to do just enough to buy your votes (or at least SAY just enough to buy your votes), while only making the problem worse. Both candidates are lying to you.

Quit plagiarizing my thoughts!

:angry:

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Per the Public Citizen, Big Oil is not drilling on the leases they already have to keep from paying royalties to US taxpayers

July 30, 2008

Oil Companies Escape Billions in Royalty Payments to Americans; Drilling Expansion Will Enrich U.S. and Foreign Corporate Freeloaders

Statement of Tyson Slocum, Director, Public Citizen’s Energy Program

A bureaucratic oversight has allowed 24 oil companies to avoid more than $1.3 billion in royalties for the privilege of extracting oil and natural gas from U.S. territory in the Gulf of Mexico - with foreign companies responsible for 55 percent of that total. But this $1.3 billion in forgone royalties pales in comparison to the $60 billion that Americans stand to lose in royalty revenue over the life of these leases. And if Congress repeals the moratorium on Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) drilling that has existed since 1982, these freeloading oil companies will be eligible to bid on new leases, providing them with more record profits while American families are left holding the bag. These 24 companies have posted a combined $365 billion in profits since 2006.

The list of the specific companies comes from a February 2008 U.S. Department of Interior memo recently obtained by Public Citizen. Four of the 24 companies (BP, Marathon, Shell and Walter Oil & Gas) signed voluntary agreements to pay royalties going forward, but they will not be required to pay the more than $200 million taxpayers have been denied on production that already has occurred.

The U.S. Senate is currently considering amendments to the Stop Excessive Energy Speculation Act of 2008 (S. 3268) that would repeal the congressional ban on offshore drilling. The U.S. House of Representatives is also considering measures in the Deep Ocean Energy Resources Act of 2008 (H.R. 6108) that would open up the OCS to new drilling. However, allowing new drilling in these areas will not significantly lower gasoline prices. According to a U.S. Department of Energy report, opening all areas off the coast of the Atlantic, Pacific and the Gulf of Mexico to new drilling "would not have a significant impact on domestic crude oil and natural gas production or prices before 2030." And new areas were opened for drilling in December 2006, when Congress passed the Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act (Public Law 109-432), which authorized leasing 8.3 million acres in the Gulf of Mexico, 70 percent of which had been previously been protected under congressional moratoria.

It is irresponsible to allow companies that escaped the payment of potentially more than $60 billion in royalties because of a loophole to get access to more leases. There is legislative precedent to force companies to pay their fair share. The House passed a measure in January 2007 that would forbid oil companies from being awarded any new leases unless they renegotiate non-royalty leases from 1998 and 1999. President Bush opposed this part of the legislation, and the Senate has yet to adopt it. The U.S. is the third-largest producer of oil in the world, and 31 percent of that production comes from land owned by the federal government.

It should not come as a surprise that much of the impetus for opening the OCS comes from an expensive advertising campaign financed by Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich’s American Solutions for Winning the Future. When Gingrich was speaker, Congress passed the Deep Water Royalty Relief Act of 1995. It turned out to be an even bigger favor than Congress had intended.

Because of a bureaucratic oversight by the Department of Interior during the implementation of the act, oil companies that secured leases in 1998 and 1999 were exempted from royalties, regardless of the prevailing market price of oil. This stands in stark contrast to other, similar leases, which require the payment of royalties if the price of oil exceeds a certain threshold. The day the bill was signed in November 1995, West Texas Intermediate oil was trading at $18.28/barrel. With oil now trading nearly 600 percent higher at more than $120/barrel, these companies have been and will be extracting very valuable energy from public land without paying any royalties to American taxpayers.

In addition, there is widespread mismanagement of the royalty program that allows oil companies to underpay royalties, resulting in Americans being cheated out of hundreds of millions of dollars. Unless that is fixed, expansion of OCS development will also unfairly enrich oil companies, most of which are foreign. A former top auditor at the Department of Interior testified under oath in March 2007 that his superiors limited his ability to collect royalties from oil companies that were owed to the American people. In 2007, a jury in a case filed under the False Claims Act found that Kerr-McGee (now Anadarko), one of the holders of the no-royalty leases from 1998 and 1999, deliberately underpaid more than $7.5 million in royalties.

The 24 companies that have already been extracting oil and natural gas from the Gulf of Mexico royalty-free and have thereby underpaid $1.3 billion in royalties are Anadarko / Kerr-McGee (U.S.); ATP (U.S.); BHP Billiton (Australia); BP (U.K.); Carlyle/Riverstone (U.S.); Chevron (U.S.); Devon (U.S.); Encana (Canada); ENI (Italy); Howell Group, Ltd (U.S.); Marathon (U.S.); Marubeni (Japan); Newfield Exploration (U.S.); Nexen (Canada); Nippon Oil (Japan); Noble Corp (Cayman Islands); Occidental (U.S.); Petrobras (Brazil); Pioneer Natural Resources (U.S.); Plains Exploration (U.S.); Shell (Netherlands); Sojitz Corp (Japan); TotalFinaElf (France);Walter Oil & Gas (U.S.).

Additionally, the following 25 companies have yet to produce on these 1998 and 1999 leases but will produce royalty-free energy in the future: Callon Petroleum (U.S.); Cobalt International Energy (U.S. firms Carlyle/Riverstone and Goldman Sachs are equity partners); El Paso Corp (U.S.); Energy Partners Ltd. (U.S.); Helix Energy Solutions (U.S.); Energy XXI (U.S.); EOG Resources (U.S.); ExxonMobil (U.S.); Helis Oil & Gas, Houston Energy and Ridgewood Energy (U.S.); Hess Corp (U.S.); Maersk Oil (Denmark); Mitsui (Japan); Murphy Oil (U.S); Noble Energy, Inc./Samson Investment Co. (U.S); Petsec Energy Ltd.(Australia); Repsol (Spain); Revus Energy (Norway); Red Willow Production (U.S.); Statoil (Norway); Stephens Production Co. (U.S.); Tana Exploration (U.S.); Teikoku Oil (Japan); Transocean (U.S.); W & T Offshore (U.S.); Woodside Energy (U.S.).

To see a breakdown of the forgone royalties, go to http://www.citizen.org/documents/OCS.pdf.

To read the Department of Interior memo obtained by Public Citizen, go to http://www.citizen.org/documents/AlfredLetter.pdf.Visit My Website.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Oil leases

If there was large amounts of oil and gas they would drill it - I have workied in the field and know exactly how it works

there are towns all over Texas and Louisiana that has pump jacks just sitting there becase these smaller companies can't afford to move them, so they give them to the owner and go out of business - why? , becasuse there wasn't anything there

EOG (ENRON Oil and Gas) :lol: - they aren't dilling anywhere, I put compressors on there leases at Barksdale Air Force Base 6 years ago because they are doing the dying flop like many other small companies that tried to look like a big dog

sometimes y'all argue over things you know nothing about and no matter what side of the polical spectrum, you look foolish

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Of course, the real problem is that McCain wants to drill in the OCS, which is a really stupid idea, and Obama wants to release a crapload of oil out of the strategic reserve while taxing so-called "windfall profits" (whatever the **** that is), which is an even dumber idea.

In other words, both candidates want to do just enough to buy your votes (or at least SAY just enough to buy your votes), while only making the problem worse. Both candidates are lying to you.

ahh the greatness that is American ( well not just American politicians all over the word do it) politics.............

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Oil will be a part of our economy for a long time, even when alternatives take hold and provide additional choices in the marketplace. Therefore, like any product, it makes sense to have a stable supply of key raw materials. We don't have that with oil, and it makes all the sense in the world to position ourselves with domestic supplies, regardless of pricing issues. We're also leaving untapped thousands of job opportunities in the energy sector for no other reason than bogus regulations that contribute to the pricing issue by creating false scarcity.

This is a macro economic issue that goes beyond the politics of the day. It always has, but it's now again getting a lot of attention.

No doubt. FWIW, that's EXACTLY my beef with the release of the SOR -- we need that oil for military, industrial and medicinal uses, and it makes zero sense to burn it for the sole purpose of making gas cheaper.

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Thank you tetsujin-28 for your excellent post. Some delusional members of this board actually defend big oil and their vice like grip on the bush administration. Personally, I think big oil and republicans are far more responsible for these high oil prices then they claim. Historical record breaking profits don't happen by accident people. C'mon now.

Do you know what a profit margin is?

C'mon now.

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