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Is John McCain Stupid?


ATL Bear
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This article along with the one I posted yesterday are prime examples of why we really have poor choices from the two main parties this year. We have one candidate who wants to tax us back to the 70's and put borders around our nation, not to stop illegal aliens, but our trading partners, and another candidate whose only real claim to being a maverick is that he might possibly stand for nothing, and thus he'll always be 'alone'.

Is John McCain Stupid?

July 31, 2008

Is John McCain losing it?

On Sunday, he said on national television that to solve Social Security "everything's on the table," which of course means raising payroll taxes. On July 7 in Denver he said: "Senator Obama will raise your taxes. I won't."

This isn't a flip-flop. It's a sex-change operation.

He got back to the subject Tuesday in Reno, Nev. Reporters asked about the Sunday tax comments. Mr. McCain replied, "The worst thing you could do is raise people's payroll taxes, my God!" Then he was asked about working with Democrats to fix Social Security, and he repeated, "everything has to be on the table." But how can . . .? Oh never mind.

Yesterday he was in Aurora, Colo., to wit: "On Social Security, he [sen. Obama] wants to raise Social Security taxes. I am opposed to raising taxes on Social Security. I want to fix the system without raising taxes."

What I'm asking is, does John McCain have the mental focus, the intellectual discipline, to avoid being out-slicked by Barack Obama, if he isn't abandoned by his own voters?

It's not just taxes. Recently the subject came up of Al Gore's assertion that the U.S. could get its energy solely from renewables in 10 years. Sen. McCain said: "If the vice president says it's doable, I believe it's doable." What!!?? In a later interview, Mr. McCain said he hadn't read "all the specifics" of the Gore plan and now, "I don't think it's doable without nuclear power." It just sounds loopy.

Then this week in San Francisco, in an interview with the Chronicle, Sen. McCain called Nancy Pelosi an "inspiration to millions of Americans." Notwithstanding his promises to "work with the other side," this is a politically obtuse thing to say in the middle of a campaign. Would Bill Clinton, running for president in 1996 after losing control of the House, have called Newt Gingrich an "inspiration"? House Minority Leader John Boehner, facing a 10-to-20 seat loss in November, must be gagging.

The one thing -- arguably the only thing -- the McCain candidacy has going for it is a sense among voters that they don't know what Barack Obama stands for or believes. Why then would Mr. McCain give voters reason to wonder the same thing about himself? You're supposed to sow doubt about the other guy, not do it to yourself.

Yes, Sen. McCain must somehow appeal to independents and blue-collar Hillary Democrats. A degree of pandering to the center is inevitable. But this stuff isn't pandering; it's simply stupid. Al Gore's own climate allies separated themselves from his preposterous free-of-oil-in-10-years whopper. Sen. McCain saying off-handedly that it's "doable" is, in a word, thoughtless.

Speaker Pelosi heads a House with a 9% approval. To let her off the hook before the election reflects similar loss of thought.

The forces arrayed against Sen. McCain's candidacy are formidable: an unpopular president, the near impossibility of extending Republican White House rule for three terms, the GOP trailing in races at every level, a listless fundraising base, doubtful sentiments about the war, a flailing economy.

The generic Democratic presidential candidate should win handily. Barack Obama, though vulnerable at the margin, is a very strong candidate. This will be a turnout election. To win, Mr. McCain needs every Republican vote he can hold.

Why make it harder than it has to be? Given such statements on Social Security taxes, Al Gore and the "inspirational" Speaker Pelosi, is there a reason why Rush Limbaugh should not spend August teeing off on Mr. McCain?

Why as well shouldn't the Obama camp exploit all of this? If Sen. Obama's "inexperience" is Mr. McCain's ace in the hole, why not trump that by asking, "Does Sen. McCain know his own mind?"

* * *

In this sports-crazed country, everyone has learned a lot about what it takes to win. They've heard and seen it proven repeatedly that to achieve greatness, to win the big one, an athlete has to be ready to "put in the work."

John McCain isn't doing that, yet. He's competing as if he expects the other side to lose it for him. Sen. McCain is a famously undisciplined politician. Someone in the McCain circle had better do some straight talking to the candidate. He's not some 19-year-old tennis player who's going to win the U.S. presidential Open on raw talent and the other guy's errors. He's not that good.

There is a reason the American people the past 100 years elevated only two sitting senators into the White House -- JFK and Warren Harding. It's because they believe most senators, adept at compulsive compromise, have no political compass and will sell them out. Now voters have to do what they prefer not to. Yes, Sen. McCain has honor and country. Another month of illogical, impolitic remarks and Sen. McCain will erase even that. Absent a coherent message for voters, he will be one-on-one with Barack Obama in the fall. He will lose.

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It would do a lot for everyone involved if people would just look up what tax rates have been over the last 60 years.

It doesn't change the fact that the Federal government spends waaaaaaaaaay too much of our money on vote buying and income redistributing pork. The tax levels over the last 60 years are completely irrelevant to whether or not they are too high. The federal governments tax schemes, regulations and irresponsible policies are a majority of the reason for the housing "crisis" and the weak dollar.

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It would do a lot for everyone involved if people would just look up what tax rates have been over the last 60 years.
Why? Because economic conditions are no different today than they have been in the past? Because tax policy, monetary policy, banking, financial services, trade, etc. are the same today? Hardly.

It would do a lot for you to look up average effective tax rates. Just because you have an extremely high marginal tax rate somewhere in the mix, doesn't mean that overall tax rates are high because, quite simply, not a lot of people fall into that bracket. As incomes have expanded, particularly in the top 25%, revenues and tax rates have increased in this category and created significant tax concentration. Furthermore, as our tax code has expanded, our embedded burden has grown tremendously through double and triple taxation in goods and services production.

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It doesn't change the fact that the Federal government spends waaaaaaaaaay too much of our money on vote buying and income redistributing pork. The tax levels over the last 60 years are completely irrelevant to whether or not they are too high. The federal governments tax schemes, regulations and irresponsible policies are a majority of the reason for the housing "crisis" and the weak dollar.
High and low are relative terms, not absolutes.
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No. He's not stupid. And anyone who thinks he is is blind. You don't become a respected member of the senate for 25 years by being dumb. Anyone that thinks he's stupid is underestimating him.

John McCain was the most respected Senator in this country until, oh, about 2 months ago, when Barack Obama sewed up the Democrat nomination. Now?..

..McCain is a stupid, old, flip-flopping, Alzheimer's-addled, wife-beating warmonger.

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John McCain was the most respected Senator in this country until, oh, about 2 months ago, when Barack Obama sewed up the Democrat nomination. Now?..

..McCain is a stupid, old, flip-flopping, Alzheimer's-addled, wife-beating warmonger.

Completely false. McCain lost his cred when he let Bush walk all over him in 2000.
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Some of you didn't bother to read the article. It isn't so much questioning his intelligence, or mental faculties, as it is his campaign and his recent gaffe's on issues that would clearly separate him from Obama. He (Obama) is an easy candidate to show policy differences with because of his very liberal stances, yet McCain continues to waffle on key positions. That's what's incredibly stupid, especially when you're having a hard enough time rallying your support base. If you're planning to win on the "lesser of two evils" position, the worst thing you can do is not look much different than the "greater evil".

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