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big boss
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i dont know a lot about the really older guys from the team since i wasnt born.:Dso here is a question

When tomy nobis played do you remember seeing a Claude Humphrey playing. And whats he a fan favorite  or not because i saw this article and it seems like hes been forgotten.

Did Atlanta forget Falcons' top pass rusher?

Humphrey returns for Hall of Fame induction

By THOMAS STINSON

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Published on: 05/31/08

Over 10 seasons, Claude Humphrey excelled for Falcons teams that would lose mind-numbing 91 games, a failure rate that eventually drove him to pack up in the middle of the 1978 season and go home to Memphis.

Three decades later, he was still wondering if he had left anything of himself behind.

image_7122263.jpg
Brandon Dill/Special
Former Atlanta Falcons defensive end Claude Humphrey poses with family portraits in his Bartlett, Tenn., home. Humphrey adds another accolade to his long list of achievements with his induction into the Atlanta Sports Hall of Fame on Saturday. Humphrey and former Falcons teammate Steve Bartkowski are among six to be inducted.

 

RELATED STORIES  " More Falcons

"I just felt the people of Atlanta had forgotten about me," he said in an interview. "I felt like my time had come and gone."

Humphrey's time returns this weekend, when the Falcons' most fearsome pass rusher of all time joins five others in the 2008 inductions into the Atlanta Sports Hall of Fame.

Some 27 years after his retirement, Humphery requires only a moment to recollect the mantra that helped get him through some of the Falcons' longest autumns.

"My approach to the game was, my opponent may have won the game but he wasn't going to be happy about it," said Humphrey, 63.

Joining Humphrey in the Atlanta Hall's fourth set of inductees are quarterback Steve Bartkowski, the Falcons' all-time leading passer, LPGA Hall of Famer Louise Suggs, two-time Olympic gold medalist Edwin Moses, former NASCAR champion Bill Elliott and Braves president John Schuerholz.

Ceremonies at the Emory Conference Center begin at 5:30 p.m. Saturday.

From 1968, when the Falcons selected him out of Tennessee State with the third pick of the draft, Humphrey would accumulate 941/2 sacks, still a franchise record. Chuck Smith (1992-98) ranks second with a distant 58 1/2.

"I always went out there with the attitude that we were good enough to win and if things went our way defensively, we always won," Humphrey said. "Offensively, we had problems.

"But the most rewarding thing was the fans. Those fans loved us."

With Tommy Nobis at middle linebacker and John Zook at right defensive end across from Humphrey on the left side, the three triangulated the team's defense for most of the 1970s. Nobis, "Mr. Falcon" and an inaugural inductee to the Atlanta Hall, would be named to four Pro Bowls. Humphrey would be named to five.

Zook will introduce Humphrey at the ceremony.

"We were always very close friends, not only teammates," Zook said. "We played the same position, but we had a lot more in common. It's an honor for me to introduce him."

Though Humphrey's career would reach its pinnacle with a Super Bowl appearance in 1981, two years after he had been traded to Philadelphia, he remembers with most partiality coach Norm Van Brocklin's Atlanta team of 1973.

Citing key players wide receiver Ken Burrow, tight end Jim Mitchell, offensive tackle George Kunz and defensive back Tom Hayes, Humphrey thinks that 9-5 team, while barely missing the playoffs, was ready for greater things.

"During that period of time, I thought we had a chance," Humphrey said. "But something happened. A lot of those guys got sent away for reasons I never understood."

Four seasons and three head coaches later, Humphrey found himself ever-altered in what would become defensive coordinator Jerry Glanville's "Gritz Blitz" scheme. While the unit would allow the fewest points in the NFL in 1977, Humphrey became a secondary rush option to the blitz, often dropping into pass coverage.

"I just didn't think I was producing the way I could have been producing," he said. "It was a long year for me. Frustrating. I just didn't feel it."

Four games into the 1978 season, assured that the team would not trade him, Humphrey left. The Falcons held on to his rights, finally sending him to the Eagles before the 1979 season for a pair of fourth-round draft picks. He would play three years in Philadelphia, including the loss to Oakland in Super Bowl XV.

Retired in 1981, Humphrey was summoned back from Tennessee four years ago for admittance to Georgia Hall of Fame but was left to ponder how he is regarded in Atlanta. Fans in 2006 declined to vote him into Falcons' Ring of Honor. Mention of his trade is omitted in the team's media guide.

Throughout though, he has kept close tabs on his first team.

"I followed them closely. Very closely," he said. "I consider myself more of a Falcon than an Eagle, even though the success we had in Philadelphia was just outstanding. If you cut me, I'll bleed red."

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big boss (5/30/2008)
i dont know a lot about the really older guys from the team since i wasnt born.:Dso here is a question

When tomy nobis played do you remember seeing a Claude Humphrey playing. And whats he a fan favorite  or not because i saw this article and it seems like hes been forgotten.

Did Atlanta forget Falcons' top pass rusher?

Humphrey returns for Hall of Fame induction

By THOMAS STINSON

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Published on: 05/31/08

Over 10 seasons, Claude Humphrey excelled for Falcons teams that would lose mind-numbing 91 games, a failure rate that eventually drove him to pack up in the middle of the 1978 season and go home to Memphis.

Three decades later, he was still wondering if he had left anything of himself behind.

image_7122263.jpg
Brandon Dill/Special
Former Atlanta Falcons defensive end Claude Humphrey poses with family portraits in his Bartlett, Tenn., home. Humphrey adds another accolade to his long list of achievements with his induction into the Atlanta Sports Hall of Fame on Saturday. Humphrey and former Falcons teammate Steve Bartkowski are among six to be inducted.

 

RELATED STORIES  " More Falcons

"I just felt the people of Atlanta had forgotten about me," he said in an interview. "I felt like my time had come and gone."

Humphrey's time returns this weekend, when the Falcons' most fearsome pass rusher of all time joins five others in the 2008 inductions into the Atlanta Sports Hall of Fame.

Some 27 years after his retirement, Humphery requires only a moment to recollect the mantra that helped get him through some of the Falcons' longest autumns.

"My approach to the game was, my opponent may have won the game but he wasn't going to be happy about it," said Humphrey, 63.

Joining Humphrey in the Atlanta Hall's fourth set of inductees are quarterback Steve Bartkowski, the Falcons' all-time leading passer, LPGA Hall of Famer Louise Suggs, two-time Olympic gold medalist Edwin Moses, former NASCAR champion Bill Elliott and Braves president John Schuerholz.

Ceremonies at the Emory Conference Center begin at 5:30 p.m. Saturday.

From 1968, when the Falcons selected him out of Tennessee State with the third pick of the draft, Humphrey would accumulate 941/2 sacks, still a franchise record. Chuck Smith (1992-98) ranks second with a distant 58 1/2.

"I always went out there with the attitude that we were good enough to win and if things went our way defensively, we always won," Humphrey said. "Offensively, we had problems.

"But the most rewarding thing was the fans. Those fans loved us."

With Tommy Nobis at middle linebacker and John Zook at right defensive end across from Humphrey on the left side, the three triangulated the team's defense for most of the 1970s. Nobis, "Mr. Falcon" and an inaugural inductee to the Atlanta Hall, would be named to four Pro Bowls. Humphrey would be named to five.

Zook will introduce Humphrey at the ceremony.

"We were always very close friends, not only teammates," Zook said. "We played the same position, but we had a lot more in common. It's an honor for me to introduce him."

Though Humphrey's career would reach its pinnacle with a Super Bowl appearance in 1981, two years after he had been traded to Philadelphia, he remembers with most partiality coach Norm Van Brocklin's Atlanta team of 1973.

Citing key players wide receiver Ken Burrow, tight end Jim Mitchell, offensive tackle George Kunz and defensive back Tom Hayes, Humphrey thinks that 9-5 team, while barely missing the playoffs, was ready for greater things.

"During that period of time, I thought we had a chance," Humphrey said. "But something happened. A lot of those guys got sent away for reasons I never understood."

Four seasons and three head coaches later, Humphrey found himself ever-altered in what would become defensive coordinator Jerry Glanville's "Gritz Blitz" scheme. While the unit would allow the fewest points in the NFL in 1977, Humphrey became a secondary rush option to the blitz, often dropping into pass coverage.

"I just didn't think I was producing the way I could have been producing," he said. "It was a long year for me. Frustrating. I just didn't feel it."

Four games into the 1978 season, assured that the team would not trade him, Humphrey left. The Falcons held on to his rights, finally sending him to the Eagles before the 1979 season for a pair of fourth-round draft picks. He would play three years in Philadelphia, including the loss to Oakland in Super Bowl XV.

Retired in 1981, Humphrey was summoned back from Tennessee four years ago for admittance to Georgia Hall of Fame but was left to ponder how he is regarded in Atlanta. Fans in 2006 declined to vote him into Falcons' Ring of Honor. Mention of his trade is omitted in the team's media guide.

Throughout though, he has kept close tabs on his first team.

"I followed them closely. Very closely," he said. "I consider myself more of a Falcon than an Eagle, even though the success we had in Philadelphia was just outstanding. If you cut me, I'll bleed red."

I've been a fan since 76.  I remember C. Humphreys but I don't ever remember seeing Nobis...I'd say no.

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falcons faithful (5/30/2008)
THIS ABOUT SAYS IT ALL ABOUT HIM. HE WAS WITH OUT A DOUBT THE BEST DE IN FALCONS HISTORY AND VERY EXCITING TO WATCH WITH HIM tOMMY n. & j. ZOOK THEY WERE THE

"GRITZ BLITZ"

SACKS CAREER YARDS

94.5 510 1968-78

okay. i read that however it says he wasnt happy withe the gritz blitz and how he was being used. Thank though for sharing your knowledge.

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big boss (5/30/2008)
i dont know a lot about the really older guys from the team since i wasnt born.:Dso here is a question

When tomy nobis played do you remember seeing a Claude Humphrey playing. And whats he a fan favorite  or not because i saw this article and it seems like hes been forgotten.

Did Atlanta forget Falcons' top pass rusher?

Yeah, Humphrey was the first real 'Beast' to play on the Falcons DL.  Dat guy could flat out scare the bejeezus out of opposing QBs.  With him and Nobis on the same side of the ball, terror was rampant when these guys were on the loose.  It wuz too bad we didn't have an offense back then.  In my 'pinion, Nobis and Humphrey should be in that Hall of Fame place up there in Ohi-er.  

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Humphrey was one of the bright spots in those days. The Falcons were horrible, and it was players like Humphrey that fans looked up to. You might call him one of the faces of the franchise in his day. He was a fearsome DE, sort of out of the Deacon Jones mold. That is to say that opponents may have been looking forward to playing the Falcons- an easy win, but not excited about lining up opposite this guy. And in all that, he was a model citizen. I'm glad he's being recognized.

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well it says in the article that even though he was the best de in our history at the time of being recognized(ring of honor) of the falcons the fans denied his entrance. So was he popular or was that because of the trade to philly

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Humphrey and Nobis, man, if we had those two at their prime right now, we'd have a really killer defense.  Humphrey was every bit an elite rusher like Abe is now and that Kerney was a few years back.  Zook wasn't so bad either but he really benefitted from the attention paid to Humphrey which made Claude even more effective.  It's as fastedbo says, that guy (and Nobis) belong in Canton but as it always seems, the Falcons get the shaft when it comes to the HoF.

As for Nobis, he is still the best LB the Falcons ever had bar none.  Tuggle was awesome but Nobis was the Atlanta version of **** Butkus.  They were both hard hitters, almost always near the ball and played hurt.  It wasn't surprising to see them with blood all over the front of their jerseys from a busted nose/eye/mouth etc.

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Dude, it says right there in the article that he played with Nobis.

I remember Claude.  He had a lot of hair back then.  If I remember correctly, he weighed 255  which was fairly big for a DE back then.  I think he also looked a little like Mean Joe Greene.

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big boss (5/30/2008)
well it says in the article that even though he was the best de in our history at the time of being recognized(ring of honor) of the falcons the fans denied his entrance. So was he popular or was that because of the trade to philly

I don't specifically remember hearing about a vote, but my guess is sour grapes because he had some success in PHI, along with the fact that you can't rely on fans to vote objectively (see: All Star Game, Pro Bowl)

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big boss (5/30/2008)
well it says in the article that even though he was the best de in our history at the time of being recognized(ring of honor) of the falcons the fans denied his entrance. So was he popular or was that because of the trade to philly

There was some bitterness going about on both ends with the trade to the Eagles.  They were turning the corner (as we were about to) in becoming playoff-bound.  He was effective but not as effective as he was here and the guys that came in behind him did pretty good although not the beast he was.  It was also during this time that Nobis retired.  Another brief note about Nobis: 294 tackles as a ROOKIE.  Still an Atlanta Falcons record. 

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Claude Humphrey and Tommy Nobis were something else in their days.  I remember a Monday night game when we were playing the Vikings. Tommy Nobis was the only man in between Fran Tarkington and the first down marker on fourth down as time was dwindling down, Fran choose the sideline instead of Nobis.  Game Over.  Fran later said something along the line of living to play another day.
 
In a game against the Saints at Atlanta Fulton Stadium on a Sunday before Thanksgiving, Claude Humphrey chased Archie Manning at least 10 yards out of bounds and laid him out.  Broke Archie's jaw right before the thanksgiving feast.
 
Those 2 guys could really bring the pain!  Claude was a true beast and John Zook was the other bookend.
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Homer Dude Man (5/30/2008)
Claude Humphrey and Tommy Nobis were something else in their days.  I remember a Monday night game when we were playing the Vikings. Tommy Nobis was the only man in between Fran Tarkington and the first down marker on fourth down as time was dwindling down, Fran choose the sideline instead of Nobis.  Game Over.  Fran later said something along the line of living to play another day.
 
In a game against the Saints at Atlanta Fulton Stadium on a Sunday before Thanksgiving, Claude Humphrey chased Archie Manning at least 10 yards out of bounds and laid him out.  Broke Archie's jaw right before the thanksgiving feast.
 
Those 2 guys could really bring the pain!  Claude was a true beast and John Zook was the other bookend.

Wow!! Those were the days!  I was just learning the game back then.  But I remember the song, "Falcon Fever" and I remember "Gritz Blitz" that's when DEFENSE was DEFENSE....:angry::crazy:

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big boss (5/30/2008)
i dont know a lot about the really older guys from the team since i wasnt born.:Dso here is a question

When tomy nobis played do you remember seeing a Claude Humphrey playing. And whats he a fan favorite  or not because i saw this article and it seems like hes been forgotten.

Did Atlanta forget Falcons' top pass rusher?

Humphrey returns for Hall of Fame induction

By THOMAS STINSON

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Published on: 05/31/08

Over 10 seasons, Claude Humphrey excelled for Falcons teams that would lose mind-numbing 91 games, a failure rate that eventually drove him to pack up in the middle of the 1978 season and go home to Memphis.

Three decades later, he was still wondering if he had left anything of himself behind.

image_7122263.jpg
Brandon Dill/Special
Former Atlanta Falcons defensive end Claude Humphrey poses with family portraits in his Bartlett, Tenn., home. Humphrey adds another accolade to his long list of achievements with his induction into the Atlanta Sports Hall of Fame on Saturday. Humphrey and former Falcons teammate Steve Bartkowski are among six to be inducted.

 

RELATED STORIES  " More Falcons

"I just felt the people of Atlanta had forgotten about me," he said in an interview. "I felt like my time had come and gone."

Humphrey's time returns this weekend, when the Falcons' most fearsome pass rusher of all time joins five others in the 2008 inductions into the Atlanta Sports Hall of Fame.

Some 27 years after his retirement, Humphery requires only a moment to recollect the mantra that helped get him through some of the Falcons' longest autumns.

"My approach to the game was, my opponent may have won the game but he wasn't going to be happy about it," said Humphrey, 63.

Joining Humphrey in the Atlanta Hall's fourth set of inductees are quarterback Steve Bartkowski, the Falcons' all-time leading passer, LPGA Hall of Famer Louise Suggs, two-time Olympic gold medalist Edwin Moses, former NASCAR champion Bill Elliott and Braves president John Schuerholz.

Ceremonies at the Emory Conference Center begin at 5:30 p.m. Saturday.

From 1968, when the Falcons selected him out of Tennessee State with the third pick of the draft, Humphrey would accumulate 941/2 sacks, still a franchise record. Chuck Smith (1992-98) ranks second with a distant 58 1/2.

"I always went out there with the attitude that we were good enough to win and if things went our way defensively, we always won," Humphrey said. "Offensively, we had problems.

"But the most rewarding thing was the fans. Those fans loved us."

With Tommy Nobis at middle linebacker and John Zook at right defensive end across from Humphrey on the left side, the three triangulated the team's defense for most of the 1970s. Nobis, "Mr. Falcon" and an inaugural inductee to the Atlanta Hall, would be named to four Pro Bowls. Humphrey would be named to five.

Zook will introduce Humphrey at the ceremony.

"We were always very close friends, not only teammates," Zook said. "We played the same position, but we had a lot more in common. It's an honor for me to introduce him."

Though Humphrey's career would reach its pinnacle with a Super Bowl appearance in 1981, two years after he had been traded to Philadelphia, he remembers with most partiality coach Norm Van Brocklin's Atlanta team of 1973.

Citing key players wide receiver Ken Burrow, tight end Jim Mitchell, offensive tackle George Kunz and defensive back Tom Hayes, Humphrey thinks that 9-5 team, while barely missing the playoffs, was ready for greater things.

"During that period of time, I thought we had a chance," Humphrey said. "But something happened. A lot of those guys got sent away for reasons I never understood."

Four seasons and three head coaches later, Humphrey found himself ever-altered in what would become defensive coordinator Jerry Glanville's "Gritz Blitz" scheme. While the unit would allow the fewest points in the NFL in 1977, Humphrey became a secondary rush option to the blitz, often dropping into pass coverage.

"I just didn't think I was producing the way I could have been producing," he said. "It was a long year for me. Frustrating. I just didn't feel it."

Four games into the 1978 season, assured that the team would not trade him, Humphrey left. The Falcons held on to his rights, finally sending him to the Eagles before the 1979 season for a pair of fourth-round draft picks. He would play three years in Philadelphia, including the loss to Oakland in Super Bowl XV.

Retired in 1981, Humphrey was summoned back from Tennessee four years ago for admittance to Georgia Hall of Fame but was left to ponder how he is regarded in Atlanta. Fans in 2006 declined to vote him into Falcons' Ring of Honor. Mention of his trade is omitted in the team's media guide.

Throughout though, he has kept close tabs on his first team.

"I followed them closely. Very closely," he said. "I consider myself more of a Falcon than an Eagle, even though the success we had in Philadelphia was just outstanding. If you cut me, I'll bleed red."

Yes....Humphrey was a fan favorite.  I remember watching him as a kid.  He was part of the Gritz Blitz.  He was H.ell on the QB's.  I was still young at the time...about 15...when I watched him play....I don't know how he was vs the run;  and I don't know how he was characterwise.

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Humphrey was awesome and had a sense of humor. One incident I recall is when the referee had to remove him from behind the other team's huddle where he was listening to the play being called. As for Nobis he was a wild man. When he would show up at an apartment party, people would start leaving. I have seen him destroy more than one apartment . After he got married he turned into a pussycat.......off the field.

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As far as I remember everybody loved Humphrey when he was playing for the Falcons. He and Nobis were tough. Claude would wear a huge bandage on his hand and forearm and would take peoples heads off with it. That was b4 it was against the rules to club someone in the head, but he was one of the best at it.

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BIG CLAUDE WAS RIGHT OUT THERE WITH TOMMY. BIG CLAUDE WAS THE BEST DE THE FALCONS HAVE EVER HAD. HE WAS OUR MEAN JOE GREEN. AS A MATTER OF FACT HE WAS JOE GREEN BEFORE .... JOE GREEN. HE WAS BIG, HE WAS FAST AND HE WAS MEAN. I SAW BIG CLAUDE DESTROY MANY A RUNNING BACK. MOST TEAMS WOULDN'T EVEN RUN HIS WAY, BUT HE'D RUN THE PLAY DOWN ANY WAY. AIN'T NOBODY KILLED MORE SAINT RUNNING BACKS THAN BIG CLAUDE. I MISS HIM. HE FINISHED HIS TIME IN PHILLY. WHAT A MAN! ....... IF BIG CLAUDE DIDN'T GET YOU ..... TOMMY NOBIS DID!:D
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