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Rap Music Glorifying Drug Use


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Rap Music Glorifying Drug Use
Study finds sixfold increase in positive portrayal of substance abuse
 
 
TUESDAY, April 1 (HealthDay News) -- Rap music is glamorizing drug use, according to a study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, who found a sixfold increase in drug references in songs over the past two decades.

"Positive portrayals of drug use have increased over time, and drug references increased overall," study author Denise Herd, associate dean of students at the School of Public Health, said in a prepared statement.

"This is an alarming trend, as rap artists are role models for the nation's youth, especially in urban areas. Many of these young people are already at risk and need to get positive messages from the media," Herd said.

She and her colleagues analyzed 341 lyrics from the most popular rap songs between 1979 and 1997. During that time, references to drug increased sixfold, and there was an increase in songs featuring positive attitudes toward drug and the consequences of drug use, and an increase in references of drug use to signify glamour, wealth and sociability. In addition, there was a significant change in the types of drugs mentioned in rap songs.

Of the 38 most popular rap songs between 1979 and 1984, only four (11 percent) contained drug references. By the late 1980s, that increased to 19 percent and by 1993, to 69 percent.

These findings indicate "a shift from cautionary songs, such as those that emphasized the dangers of cocaine and crack, to songs that glorify the use of marijuana and other drugs as part of a desirable hip-hop lifestyle," Herd said. "This is alarming, because young children are exposed to these messages. I don't think this is a story we as a society want them to absorb."

For example, she noted that references to cough medicine abuse in lyrics from Southwestern groups performing an underground rap genre called "Screw Music" may be

linked to high numbers of Houston teens abusing codeine-laced cough syrup (prounounced "sizz-urp")

"Rap music is like CNN for black teens. But much of what is discussed in rap is in code. The kids understand, but parents don't," said Herd, who recommended parents monitor their children's music and learn about the terms used in popular songs.

The study was published in the April issue of Addiction Research & Theory.

Earlier research by Herd found that alcohol use is increasingly glorified in rap music.

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the amount of rappers talking about "lean" (that's that "sizz-urp" again) is pretty annoying. it used to be only the geeky white kids got high on cough medicine.

but anyway, i don't really care. they've been saying that about popular music since the 50s.

too bad we have idiotic drug laws in this country that created a black market willing to give drugs to kids...

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Statick (4/3/2008)
reiri (4/3/2008)
''Rap is like CNN for black teens''

Big generalization

Actually, they kinda stole that line from Chuck D.

Not saying that it's fully viable, but they should give the man some cred.

 

Didnt chuck D form that group with falovor flav?...he deserves no credit

Flavor Flav sets back the black race 20 years everytime he gets on TV

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XLDenaliReturns (4/3/2008)
the amount of rappers talking about "lean" (that's that "sizz-urp" again) is pretty annoying. it used to be only the geeky white kids got high on cough medicine.

but anyway, i don't really care. they've been saying that about popular music since the 50s.

too bad we have idiotic drug laws in this country that created a black market willing to give drugs to kids...

tru-dat

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reiri (4/3/2008)
Statick (4/3/2008)
reiri (4/3/2008)
''Rap is like CNN for black teens''

Big generalization

Actually, they kinda stole that line from Chuck D.

Not saying that it's fully viable, but they should give the man some cred.

 

Didnt chuck D form that group with falovor flav?...he deserves no credit

Flavor Flav sets back the black race 20 years everytime he gets on TV

I really don't think Chuck has anything to do with Flavor Flav's choice of making an azz of himself on cable TV with a bunch of ska.nks, especially since Flavor is older than him. :hehe:

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Statick (4/3/2008)
Rap Music Glorifying Drug Use
Study finds sixfold increase in positive portrayal of substance abuse
TUESDAY, April 1 (HealthDay News) -- Rap music is glamorizing druguse, according to a study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, who found a sixfold increase in drug references in songs over the past two decades.

"Positive portrayals of druguse have increased over time, and drug references increased overall," study author Denise Herd, associate dean of students at the School of Public Health, said in a prepared statement.

"This is an alarming trend, as rap artists are role models for the nation's youth, especially in urban areas. Many of these young people are already at risk and need to get positive messages from the media," Herd said.

She and her colleagues analyzed 341 lyrics from the most popular rap songs between 1979 and 1997. During that time, references todrugincreased sixfold, and there was an increase in songs featuring positive attitudes toward drugand the consequences of druguse, and an increase in references of druguse to signify glamour, wealth and sociability. In addition, there was a significant change in the types of drugsmentioned in rap songs.

Of the 38 most popular rap songs between 1979 and 1984, only four (11 percent) contained drug references. By the late 1980s, that increased to 19 percent and by 1993, to 69 percent.

These findings indicate "a shift from cautionary songs, such as those that emphasized the dangers of cocaine and crack, to songs that glorify the use of marijuana and other drugs as part of a desirable hip-hop lifestyle," Herd said. "This is alarming, because young children are exposed to these messages. I don't think this is a story we as a society want them to absorb."

For example, she noted that references to cough medicine abuse in lyrics from Southwestern groups performing an underground rap genre called "Screw Music" may be

linked to high numbers of Houston teens abusing codeine-laced cough syrup (prounounced "sizz-urp")

"Rap music is like CNN for black teens. But much of what is discussed in rap is in code. The kids understand, but parents don't," said Herd, who recommended parents monitor their children's music and learn about the terms used in popular songs.

The study was published in the April issue of Addiction Research & Theory.

Earlier research by Herd found that alcohol use is increasingly glorified in rap music.

I hope this study didn't cost over 15 cents and take over 2 minutes.

What next..a study that says s*** stinks?

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I grew up listening to early, Golden Age hip-hop, back in the early 1990s through 2002-ish, when there was still an intellectual element to the genre...

I can't even tolerate the crap that's being released today...

I can count on my hands the number of hip-hop artists I still listen to and purchase albums from:

The Roots

Outkast

Common

Mos Def

Talib Kweli

And thats about it. If there one single or something I like, then I just rip it or borrow someone else's CD to copy it. I'm not buying that crap they're calling music...

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FalconsFor6 (4/3/2008)
I grew up listening to early, Golden Age hip-hop, back in the early 1990s through 2002-ish, when there was still an intellectual element to the genre...

I can't even tolerate the crap that's being released today...

I can count on my hands the number of hip-hop artists I still listen to and purchase albums from:

The Roots

Outkast

Common

Mos Def

Talib Kweli

And thats about it. If there one single or something I like, then I just rip it or borrow someone else's CD to copy it. I'm not buying that crap they're calling music...

You and I are from the same era of hip hop listener.

I still listen to alot my old stuff on the regular.

Digable Planets

De La Soul

BDP

Arrested Development

Run DMC

A Tribe Called Quest

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Statick (4/3/2008)
 
She and her colleagues analyzed 341 lyrics from the most popular rap songs between 1979 and 1997.

Uhhhh.... they couldn't get a hold of anything more recent?  And how much rap was out in 1979?  That's like going back to the 70's to analyze techno music... 

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FalconsFor6 (4/3/2008)
I grew up listening to early, Golden Age hip-hop, back in the early 1990s through 2002-ish, when there was still an intellectual element to the genre...

I can't even tolerate the crap that's being released today...

I can count on my hands the number of hip-hop artists I still listen to and purchase albums from:

The Roots

Outkast

Common

Mos Def

Talib Kweli

And thats about it. If there one single or something I like, then I just rip it or borrow someone else's CD to copy it. I'm not buying that crap they're calling music...

Back in my day!

man.jpg

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Statick (4/3/2008)
FalconsFor6 (4/3/2008)
I grew up listening to early, Golden Age hip-hop, back in the early 1990s through 2002-ish, when there was still an intellectual element to the genre...

I can't even tolerate the crap that's being released today...

I can count on my hands the number of hip-hop artists I still listen to and purchase albums from:

The Roots

Outkast

Common

Mos Def

Talib Kweli

And thats about it. If there one single or something I like, then I just rip it or borrow someone else's CD to copy it. I'm not buying that crap they're calling music...

You and I are from the same era of hip hop listener.

I still listen to alot my old stuff on the regular.

Digable Planets

De La Soul

BDP

Arrested Development

Run DMC

A Tribe Called Quest

Yep, we sure are...

If I get into the mood to buy some new music, I usually go through my collection and fill in albums from groups of that era that I'm missing...

I really don't buy anything from any artist of today unless they are on that list above...

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charlestonchad (4/3/2008)
FalconsFor6 (4/3/2008)
I grew up listening to early, Golden Age hip-hop, back in the early 1990s through 2002-ish, when there was still an intellectual element to the genre...

I can't even tolerate the crap that's being released today...

I can count on my hands the number of hip-hop artists I still listen to and purchase albums from:

The Roots

Outkast

Common

Mos Def

Talib Kweli

And thats about it. If there one single or something I like, then I just rip it or borrow someone else's CD to copy it. I'm not buying that crap they're calling music...

Back in my day!

man.jpg

Oddly enough, that's how I feel when I scan the local rap radio station...:laugh:

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Rap music:

Yo dog I will shoot you.

If you got a friend gonna shoot him too.

I smoke weed all day and sip a 40 ounce.

While I make this music that makes you bounce.

I'm so rich now it makes you sick.

While your fine ### girl is on my ####.

Uh Uh Uh what what yo yo yo Big G in the house.

Every rapper and every song sounds the same. I killed this person, I'm gonna kill that guy and his mother, gonna smoke some weed and drink, gonna bang that girl and her sister.

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Lord Dark Helmet (4/3/2008)
Rap music:

Yo dog I will shoot you.

If you got a friend gonna shoot him too.

I smoke weed all day and sip a 40 ounce.

While I make this music that makes you bounce.

I'm so rich now it makes you sick.

While your fine ### girl is on my ####.

Uh Uh Uh what what yo yo yo Big G in the house.

Every rapper and every song sounds the same. I killed this person, I'm gonna kill that guy and his mother, gonna smoke some weed and drink, gonna bang that girl and her sister.

That's pretty sick man, you with a recording company yet?

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I don't get these people who are so passionately against weed, but they drink enough alcohol that their liver won't last two more days. So why don't yall light a fat blunt to this:

Didnt chuck D form that group with falovor flav?...he deserves no credit

Flavor Flav sets back the black race 20 years everytime he gets on TV

Don't compare today's Flav with late 80s, early 90s Flav. Public enemy was and still is one of the greatest groups of all time.

Mathis81WR (4/3/2008)
I learned how to make crack from the intro to a Master P cd.

Really though :laugh:

And here is another song for all the rap haters out there:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=SA4G5xLkQxA

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