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Christian Colleges?


Darqness
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Darqness (2/11/2008)
Getting a lot of letters from universities and colleges lately, and my top 3 are Pepperdine, TCU, and Cal. However, Pepperdine and TCU and christian schools.

Is there anything different about them I should know about?

Seems Notre Dame is a fine university and it is a christian college..

Maybe they have their own version of touchdown Jesus.

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Right now I am attending Salve Regina University, it is a small catholic school in Newport, RI. It is not much different from any other schools, the biggest thing is they require us to take 2 religion classes. there arent the types of classes that attempt to force you to believe as they do though, the one required one is an overview of different world religions. there are other ones like scripture classes and religious history in the area as well. i just look at them as a type of literature or sociology class and it isnt too bad.

as for the social aspect, they dont allow people of the opposite sex to sleep in the same dorm room, but the RA's are in charge of enforcing it and i have never seen one who cares at all. the school is also a dry campus, i dont know if thats for religous reasons or not, but its not that big of a deal, just go to a friend's house off campus and that problem is solved.

so what i'm basically saying is some are very similar to other schools. i'm sure there are some that are really hardcore about the religious stuff, but from personal experience i barely even notice it.

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As a former history prof at a Christian college, let me say that they vary GREATLY, from flat-earth fundamentalism to the point that you'll barely notice a Christian presence.

Look at the doctrinal statement of the college, look at their "rules and regulations" regarding student conduct, you'll get the idea. See what they require in terms of community service. If you go to Bob Jones, you must attend church (the one they tell you to attend), teach Sunday School, etc. I would not suggest such a choice.

Some will ask that you provide a statement of your salvation experience as a requisite for entry. Are you "born again?" If you aren't sure what the question is, look elswhere.

Some might require one or two courses in religion or Bible, some might require the equivalent of a minor. Some might have required chapel daily, most not.

Think of Christian colleges the way you would churches; they run from the very open, unitarian/universalist, to the most narrow minded, hate just about everyone else types--just the sin, of course, not the sinner.

Is the University inclusive, looking for comon ground, or exclusive, looking for reasons to exclude? No drinking, no dancing, no card playing, no getting engaged without the Dean's approval, no secular music in the dorm, no PDA (public displays of affection, like holding hands or hugging), coupled with a strong anti-gay, anti-abortion stance. Oh, and the earth is 6,000 years old, 10,000 max. No women in the clergy, but they can spend their lives as missionaries. And any Bible published since 1611 is full of liberal propganda.

Are you getting the idea? :)

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MNRon (2/11/2008)
As a former history prof at a Christian college, let me say that they vary GREATLY, from flat-earth fundamentalism to the point that you'll barely notice a Christian presence.

Look at the doctrinal statement of the college, look at their "rules and regulations" regarding student conduct, you'll get the idea. See what they require in terms of community service. If you go to Bob Jones, you must attend church (the one they tell you to attend), teach Sunday School, etc. I would not suggest such a choice.

Some will ask that you provide a statement of your salvation experience as a requisite for entry. Are you "born again?" If you aren't sure what the question is, look elswhere.

Some might require one or two courses in religion or Bible, some might require the equivalent of a minor. Some might have required chapel daily, most not.

Think of Christian colleges the way you would churches; they run from the very open, unitarian/universalist, to the most narrow minded, hate just about everyone else types--just the sin, of course, not the sinner.

Is the University inclusive, looking for comon ground, or exclusive, looking for reasons to exclude? No drinking, no dancing, no card playing, no getting engaged without the Dean's approval, no secular music in the dorm, no PDA (public displays of affection, like holding hands or hugging), coupled with a strong anti-gay, anti-abortion stance. Oh, and the earth is 6,000 years old, 10,000 max. No women in the clergy, but they can spend their lives as missionaries. And any Bible published since 1611 is full of liberal propganda.

Are you getting the idea? :)

I recently interviewed at several Christian universities and I can echo the view that they vary greatly.

I believe Pepperdine is less overtly religious than TCU, although neither are on the Bob Jones side of the spectrum. Most Catholic schools are very secular in their teachings even if they have Catholic core values that they promote on the website.

You might look at the college's human resources department and look at their ads for job openings. If they advertise to potential job candidates that they expect conformity with the Christian values of the college then you might consider that before joining.

That said, I don't see what the big deal would be unless you have very strong sectarian beliefs (e.g., if you're Jewish or Muslim or Catholic looking at a Baptist school). You might have to attend church once a week, but very, very few Christian universities let religion influence their curriculum. And frankly, these small colleges typically have HUGE endowments (one small university I looked at had a $100 million plus endowment with fewer than 1,400 students). They tend to pay professors a lot better and so the quality of education tends to be a lot higher. They're also more expensive where tuition is concerned, so it's a balance.

What are you thinking about doing after you get your undergrad degree?

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Waterproof_ace83 (2/11/2008)
Right now I am attending Salve Regina University, it is a small catholic school in Newport, RI. It is not much different from any other schools, the biggest thing is they require us to take 2 religion classes. there arent the types of classes that attempt to force you to believe as they do though, the one required one is an overview of different world religions. there are other ones like scripture classes and religious history in the area as well. i just look at them as a type of literature or sociology class and it isnt too bad.

as for the social aspect, they dont allow people of the opposite sex to sleep in the same dorm room, but the RA's are in charge of enforcing it and i have never seen one who cares at all. the school is also a dry campus, i dont know if thats for religous reasons or not, but its not that big of a deal, just go to a friend's house off campus and that problem is solved.

so what i'm basically saying is some are very similar to other schools. i'm sure there are some that are really hardcore about the religious stuff, but from personal experience i barely even notice it.

This sounds pretty much spot on. I go to Reinhardt College in north GA. It's a Christian school. You have to take 2 religion classes as mentioned, but they don't force their beliefs on you. It's also a dry campus, but alcohol is obviously not hard to find.

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I go to Emmanuel in NE Georgia...it's rather nice...but I'm Christian, so I would think that, wouldn't I?.....I'd say most Christian schools, if you aren't a Christian(I'll spare trying to convert you, for now, lol), just keep your mouth shut, and don't do anything too stupid on campus, and you'll be fine....some of the religion classes are the equivalent of high level history courses though...and EC requires several....

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Ramen (2/11/2008)
MNRon (2/11/2008)
As a former history prof at a Christian college, let me say that they vary GREATLY, from flat-earth fundamentalism to the point that you'll barely notice a Christian presence.

Look at the doctrinal statement of the college, look at their "rules and regulations" regarding student conduct, you'll get the idea. See what they require in terms of community service. If you go to Bob Jones, you must attend church (the one they tell you to attend), teach Sunday School, etc. I would not suggest such a choice.

Some will ask that you provide a statement of your salvation experience as a requisite for entry. Are you "born again?" If you aren't sure what the question is, look elswhere.

Some might require one or two courses in religion or Bible, some might require the equivalent of a minor. Some might have required chapel daily, most not.

Think of Christian colleges the way you would churches; they run from the very open, unitarian/universalist, to the most narrow minded, hate just about everyone else types--just the sin, of course, not the sinner.

Is the University inclusive, looking for comon ground, or exclusive, looking for reasons to exclude? No drinking, no dancing, no card playing, no getting engaged without the Dean's approval, no secular music in the dorm, no PDA (public displays of affection, like holding hands or hugging), coupled with a strong anti-gay, anti-abortion stance. Oh, and the earth is 6,000 years old, 10,000 max. No women in the clergy, but they can spend their lives as missionaries. And any Bible published since 1611 is full of liberal propganda.

Are you getting the idea? :)

I recently interviewed at several Christian universities and I can echo the view that they vary greatly.

I believe Pepperdine is less overtly religious than TCU, although neither are on the Bob Jones side of the spectrum. Most Catholic schools are very secular in their teachings even if they have Catholic core values that they promote on the website.

You might look at the college's human resources department and look at their ads for job openings. If they advertise to potential job candidates that they expect conformity with the Christian values of the college then you might consider that before joining.

That said, I don't see what the big deal would be unless you have very strong sectarian beliefs (e.g., if you're Jewish or Muslim or Catholic looking at a Baptist school). You might have to attend church once a week, but very, very few Christian universities let religion influence their curriculum. And frankly, these small colleges typically have HUGE endowments (one small university I looked at had a $100 million plus endowment with fewer than 1,400 students). They tend to pay professors a lot better and so the quality of education tends to be a lot higher. They're also more expensive where tuition is concerned, so it's a balance.

What are you thinking about doing after you get your undergrad degree?

I'm actually thinking of going into medicine, probaly neurology. I want to find a cure for this obscure vision I get sometimes that for some reason just seems to scare me even though it all looks relatively the same. I figure its neurological so that's why I decided to go there.

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Darqness (2/11/2008)
I'm actually thinking of going into medicine, probaly neurology. I want to find a cure for this obscure vision I get sometimes that for some reason just seems to scare me even though it all looks relatively the same. I figure its neurological so that's why I decided to go there.

Okay, the best thing is to find a neurologist and ask his or her advice. In my field, coming out of a small, high quality liberal arts college is better for getting into the Ivy League grad programs than coming out of those Ivy League undergrad programs (IOW, it's hard to get into Harvard's grad school with a Harvard undergrad). You'll often find little quirks like this which you wish you had known before choosing the college, so best to find someone who is working in the field you're interested in and find those out early.

Also keep in mind that a lot of people change their minds once they get into college. For most fields you can't go wrong with a great 4-year lib arts education, assuming that finances are not an issue. If you go to a large university, then you'll have the sports and prestige but your teachers will primarily be graduate students. People think that because they're going to Michigan or LSU that they'll be taught by the best professors in the field. The best professors in the field DO work at the large universities. However, those are research universities and the professors typically only teach one or two courses a semester. That means the grad students are the ones teaching most of the classes, which means you are not getting as good of an education as you would get learning from an actual professor at a smaller university.

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Okay, the best thing is to find a neurologist and ask his or her advice. In my field, coming out of a small, high quality liberal arts college is better for getting into the Ivy League grad programs than coming out of those Ivy League undergrad programs (IOW, it's hard to get into Harvard's grad school with a Harvard undergrad). You'll often find little quirks like this which you wish you had known before choosing the college, so best to find someone who is working in the field you're interested in and find those out early.

Also keep in mind that a lot of people change their minds once they get into college. For most fields you can't go wrong with a great 4-year lib arts education, assuming that finances are not an issue. If you go to a large university, then you'll have the sports and prestige but your teachers will primarily be graduate students. People think that because they're going to Michigan or LSU that they'll be taught by the best professors in the field. The best professors in the field DO work at the large universities. However, those are research universities and the professors typically only teach one or two courses a semester. That means the grad students are the ones teaching most of the classes, which means you are not getting as good of an education as you would get learning from an actual professor at a smaller university.

Yeah, I've been looking into Cal Berkeley more now because they have a 5 year program to get an MD and a MS. It requires being simultaniously enrolled in UC San Francisco and Berkeley, and only a handful of students do it each year.

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scott24falcs (2/11/2008)
Waterproof_ace83 (2/11/2008)
Right now I am attending Salve Regina University, it is a small catholic school in Newport, RI. It is not much different from any other schools, the biggest thing is they require us to take 2 religion classes. there arent the types of classes that attempt to force you to believe as they do though, the one required one is an overview of different world religions. there are other ones like scripture classes and religious history in the area as well. i just look at them as a type of literature or sociology class and it isnt too bad.

as for the social aspect, they dont allow people of the opposite sex to sleep in the same dorm room, but the RA's are in charge of enforcing it and i have never seen one who cares at all. the school is also a dry campus, i dont know if thats for religous reasons or not, but its not that big of a deal, just go to a friend's house off campus and that problem is solved.

so what i'm basically saying is some are very similar to other schools. i'm sure there are some that are really hardcore about the religious stuff, but from personal experience i barely even notice it.

This sounds pretty much spot on. I go to Reinhardt College in north GA. It's a Christian school. You have to take 2 religion classes as mentioned, but they don't force their beliefs on you. It's also a dry campus, but alcohol is obviously not hard to find.

I have a couple of nieces (Ross) that attend that school. I had never heard of it but apparently way down the line someone in their family founded it. Do you like it pretty well?

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If you want to go into medicine, then the more selective the school the better your options will be for med schools. If you come from a small, unheard of school, then you're not going to be as likely to get interviews at the med schools if you don't have a 3.9 or higher.

And something I never considered before, but the harder it is to get into your undergraduate school, the harder working the students will be. You'll have more competition in the classes, which makes it a lot easier to stay motivated if you see that all of your class mates are working as hard as you.

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backnblack (2/12/2008)
scott24falcs (2/11/2008)
Waterproof_ace83 (2/11/2008)
Right now I am attending Salve Regina University, it is a small catholic school in Newport, RI. It is not much different from any other schools, the biggest thing is they require us to take 2 religion classes. there arent the types of classes that attempt to force you to believe as they do though, the one required one is an overview of different world religions. there are other ones like scripture classes and religious history in the area as well. i just look at them as a type of literature or sociology class and it isnt too bad.

as for the social aspect, they dont allow people of the opposite sex to sleep in the same dorm room, but the RA's are in charge of enforcing it and i have never seen one who cares at all. the school is also a dry campus, i dont know if thats for religous reasons or not, but its not that big of a deal, just go to a friend's house off campus and that problem is solved.

so what i'm basically saying is some are very similar to other schools. i'm sure there are some that are really hardcore about the religious stuff, but from personal experience i barely even notice it.

This sounds pretty much spot on. I go to Reinhardt College in north GA. It's a Christian school. You have to take 2 religion classes as mentioned, but they don't force their beliefs on you. It's also a dry campus, but alcohol is obviously not hard to find.

I have a couple of nieces (Ross) that attend that school. I had never heard of it but apparently way down the line someone in their family founded it. Do you like it pretty well?

Yeah, it's basically out in the middle of nowhere in Waleska, GA (Cherokee County), but it's a nice school. I'm working on my first year, but so far it's going pretty well. I had never heard of it either until I received a letter from them in the mail. They had the major I was interested in (Sports Studies), and gave me a nice chunk of change to go there. Hopefully one day I'll have a job with the Birds. ;)

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