Jump to content

To all the Doctors out there.


Recommended Posts

Long story short, I tumble for Hawaii Pacific University, and while doing a pass, I came up gimp. I've had this pain before, but never this bad.

It is at the very lower end of my patellar? tibial tendon, right where it connects to the Tibia. I have been told by our team Doc. that it's something that only time can heal. She recommends taking a month off.

The problem is that like I said, I have had this before, and I have had to take a month off 3 seperate times now in 2.5 years. Each time I ease it back into tumbling shape (I run with non-impact machines and stay in relative good shape even with it) and it seems as soon as I go all out, I'm back on the sidelines.

Any help would be much appreciated. Currently the only doctor's orders are Ice and a month off of impact, so is there anything else I could/should be doing.

Link to post
Share on other sites
ak_falcon27 (1/28/2008)
Long story short, I tumble for Hawaii Pacific University, and while doing a pass, I came up gimp. I've had this pain before, but never this bad.

It is at the very lower end of my patellar? tibial tendon, right where it connects to the Tibia. I have been told by our team Doc. that it's something that only time can heal. She recommends taking a month off.

The problem is that like I said, I have had this before, and I have had to take a month off 3 seperate times now in 2.5 years. Each time I ease it back into tumbling shape (I run with non-impact machines and stay in relative good shape even with it) and it seems as soon as I go all out, I'm back on the sidelines.

Any help would be much appreciated. Currently the only doctor's orders are Ice and a month off of impact, so is there anything else I could/should be doing.

In a sense you have a high ankle sprain. You don't need screws inputted to secure it (because I'm sure you could tell if was unstable or not), so that type of treatment is out of the door. The doctor is pretty much right in the fact that you need to take time off. If it is the same recurring injury, you may just simply have weak ankles, or the propensity to roll them. If you decide to take the prescribed time off, try doing some strengthening exercises to help rehab it. If you don't know of any, I can try to help you find some.

Link to post
Share on other sites
ak_falcon27 (1/29/2008)
Well actually its just below the knee at the very top of the tibia. One problem is that there is no lateral movement, so braces can't help.

Ahh, gotcha. Well all you really can do is take some time off. Sorry, for some reason I was thinking tibia was the lower bone :P

Link to post
Share on other sites

What is the doctor telling you? Does he/she think it s a partial tear, or just a sprain? If it is just a sprain, you will want to let it heal completely, then focus on exercises that stretch the tendon. If you are doing any lifting with the lower body, stop immediately, as it will only exacerbate the problem. Strong muscles around weak tendons is a recipe for disaster. Stretching exercises coupled with agility conditioning once you are healed should replace lifting.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had problems with my patella tendons as a result of chrondomalacia. After several attempts at resolution by resting, PT, etc., I finally elected to have surgery. I don't remember the actual name of the procedure, but the upshot is the surgeon elevates the tendon a bit at the place it attaches to the bone. The surgery worked, but I only did that after it became apparent that other less invasive treatment just wasn't going to work over the long haul.

Link to post
Share on other sites
kicker23 (1/29/2008)
What is the doctor telling you? Does he/she think it s a partial tear, or just a sprain? If it is just a sprain, you will want to let it heal completely, then focus on exercises that stretch the tendon. If you are doing any lifting with the lower body, stop immediately, as it will only exacerbate the problem. Strong muscles around weak tendons is a recipe for disaster. Stretching exercises coupled with agility conditioning once you are healed should replace lifting.

Yeah, a sprain. My rehab only constitutes as swimming, horizontal bicycling, and other exercises that does not have impact.

btw, I kinda feel like Abraham....

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would need to see a CT and xray of your knee, as well as perform some functional testing to make any reasonable diagnosis and give you specific advice.

As it stands, the old Rest, Ice, and Elevate treatment is your best option. One other thing you could do is called muscle energy.

Stand next to a wall and stabilize yourself with the arm opposite the side of the injury. Using the arm on the same side as the knee injury grab your ankle like you were going to do a quad stretch(where you bring your leg back towards your butt while keeping your thigh in the same place). Keep your leg at a 90 degree angle to your thigh, dont pull it back any further. While holding your leg, apply a slight downward force in your leg like you are trying to kick....hold this for 5 seconds. After 5 seconds, and while still holding your ankle, relax for 3 seconds, then pull your ankle a little closer to your butt(just an inch or two) and apply the kicking force again for 5 seconds while holding the leg in this new barrier. Repeat 3 more times so that by the last 'rep' your leg is at a 60 degree angle to your leg instead of 80.

After the 5 total reps, completely relax your leg for 10 seconds, then repeat. Do this whole procedure 5 times....it only takes about 2 minutes total.

I wouldnt recommend actively stretching the leg more than about that 60 degrees for now. I know you are a gymnist and are very flexible...but in stretching a tendon/muscle that is inflamed from damage you want to be VERY mild in attacking it's barrier. If you overstretch the tendon/muscle it's mechanoreceptors will flair up and you are actually making the problem worse. PM me if you have any more questions/concerns.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ehh...pain killers. A lot of problems can be solved without painkillers...a lot of musculoskeletal problems can be fixed without anti-inflammatories and pain killers. Things involving visceral pain are much harder to help....unless they are caused directly by the musculoskeletal system...and if not pain medication helps. Like end term cancer, Huntington's disease, etc.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...