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Robb4242

nfl truth: hip-hop culture hurting nfl

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this is a cop out article.................

let me see if i understand the premise, these guys act like clowns, so hip-hop is to blame??? bull.......

did swiftkick write this article?????

let me state a fact about pro footballl that he does not acknowledge............bigger, stronger, faster............

and big money........

those facts alone will negate the 50% projected future numbers for black players in the nfl, if anything, it's going to go in the other direction, bank on it!!!

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another irresponsible column penned by whitlock.

hip hop is the dominant culture for all children...

the same hip hop athelete he believes the nfl is rejecting, is the same athelete that is used extensively by the league to market the game. phase them out because they're "hip hop"? that doesn't even make any sense!!!

blaming the bengals problems on chad johson? i'm certain carson palmer's turnover problems and the bengals inability to develop quality defensive players have nothing to do with it?

kansas city's season was doomed from the start with all the turnover along the offensive line and the uncertainty at qb, yet their suffering because larry johnson is a hip hop athelete?

i wonder why he didn't run the numbers on the following teams (also those very successful over the past 10 years):

pittsburgh steelers

philadelphia eagles

seattle seahawks

st. louis rams

tennesse titans

baltimore ravens

because the don't fit in with the jive found in his articles.

this clown is a buffoon on the highest level!

you're making entirely too much sense. but anyway, whitlock has pretty much seen that the way to climb the big box media food chain (if he doesn't eat it first) is to be the armstrong williams of sports....haven't you noticed that its the newest fad in political/sports talk?? have a resident stepinn-fetchit on board to validate the continous castrating of all things hip-hop. its all about the benjamins for whitlock, being a hired mantan pays well these days.

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great post. and to add to it. he also cherry picked from the teams he did use. he takes the shot at to, but somehow exempts randy moss?... i guess it's because randy is surrounded by white guys now.

also; wouldnt ray lewis and ed reed fall into the "hip-hop athlete" stereotype he wants to create? oh wait, no? they're brash, arrogant, and bold... but good leaders. i think it's just sickening to point to like 4 criminals and then lump a whole generation of kids into that. i figured we had moved past this brand of idiocy in the 80s, when people realized that blaming twisted sister for kids wanting to have sex and do drugs was downright silly. i'm shocked that people believe in horse###### like this.

"i tell you what. i might not always see eye-to-eye with whitlock. but he got it right this time".... i swear to god, i see that line typed everytime a whitlock article is posted. apparently, alot of people always see eye-to-eye with whitlock, and have some creepy reluctance to admit it.

is ed reed in that stereotype? he doesnt get much pub or endorsements even after his dpoy, and i dont get to watch many of the ravens games, and i dont recall many locker room things about it. does he have a rep?

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i dont think i said that. i asked who was the last white player who had a rep for overdoing it on the field...and i answered my own question with bill romanowski.

i didnt say a thing about white guys not doing stuff on the field...but about players known for doing it on a regular basis. of course white players 'celebrate' on the field, ya see it every sunday. i am not even trying to take away from players that do go 'overboard' with their antics, its all relative to how much a person cares about their actions. i, personally, always had a different style of celebrating...but i wouldnt take anything away from the guys that would go wild. its just how they act on the field. it usually wasnt indicitive of who they were off the field. usually.

ok fine. perfect example. jeremy shockey. completely overdoes it on the field, and in the locker room in terms of quotes and lashing out at his coaches, and other coaches & players around the league. also, comes from a school known for producing "thugs", and is tatted up. while he is thought of as a jerk; he is never refered to as a "thug" or a "hip-hop athlete".

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can anyone tell me exactly what hip-hop culture is? you hear it all the time not only from the whitlocks and o'reillys of the world but even sharpton and jackson use the term. is it just a term they can use to blame today's issues on or is there truly a way of life that could be considered the "hip-hop way?"

i'm not being sarcastic i am really interested in what some of the folks of color (for lack of a better term to use use without offending anyone), have to say on this. thanks!

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most of the people that blame hip hop or look at it in a negative way probably never heard the illmatic cd. never heard 2pac when he first came out and was making song like keep ya head up and dear mama,never heard songs like biggie - juicy

they go by what is played now and girls like that music the most.

not only have i heard illmatic but could tell you the tracklisting and the producer of each track.

btw, that first biggie album was mostly about robbing and killing. "juicy" was basically, i grew up poor but now i have money and a lot of gaudy things, so i'm better than you.

tupac contradicted himself to the extreme.

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the point is you hear the lyrics that doesn't mean you have to do it. if you choose to do it thats strictly on you and it's not on hip hop.

i can't even understand the lyrics of hip-hop music - not that i'm complaining - i better off not knowing what they're saying.

the article is right on target. the nfl and goddell have their work cut out for them. simply changing the racial balance of the nfl or individual teams won't fix the problem. some serious disciplinary actions might.

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most of the people that blame hip hop or look at it in a negative way probably never heard the illmatic cd. never heard 2pac when he first came out and was making song like keep ya head up and dear mama,never heard songs like biggie - juicy

they go by what is played now and girls like that music the most.

i think his comment associating it to hip hop has really distracted from the overall point i thought he was trying to make. the point i got out of the article is that the actions of the few can hinder the prospects of the future. he feels like everything the past greats had to work for (ali, jordan, magic, kareem, dr j, etc) is being overshadowed by the actions of some of the current high profile athletes. in other words, he worries that all of the progress african american athletes have made through dedication and hard work may start taking a step back because of what's being perceived now. i agree with that overall point. i'm not saying it will, but if people start to see a trend in behavior (even if it's only a small minority that does it), it very well could. if you don't agree, think about the common perception about muslims before and after 9/11. i'm not trying to compare that with hip hop or anything like that, i'm just proving the point regarding actions of the few can ultimately alter the perception of the many.

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okay i don't get this on this message board you hear people saying black people need to stop blaming "the man" or blaming other people for their struggles or actions and take responsibility for their own actions.

then

you get articles blaming the hip hop culture and some of those same people will say "right on" good article.

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okay i don't get this on this message board you hear people saying black people need to stop blaming "the man" or blaming other people for their struggles or actions and take responsibility for their own actions.

then

you get articles blaming the hip hop culture and some of those same people will say "right on" good article.

so you see the blatant hypocrisy too?? you're not the only one, a lot of people see it too.

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interesting perspective.

come to think of it, who was the last 'white' player to have negative on the field antics?

bill romanowski?

kerney and joe jerry do some strutting and chest puffing...those are about the only guys off the top of my head that perform extracarricular celebrations.

a_turley_i.jpg

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can anyone tell me exactly what hip-hop culture is? you hear it all the time not only from the whitlocks and o'reillys of the world but even sharpton and jackson use the term. is it just a term they can use to blame today's issues on or is there truly a way of life that could be considered the "hip-hop way?"

i'm not being sarcastic i am really interested in what some of the folks of color (for lack of a better term to use use without offending anyone), have to say on this. thanks!

first off, "folks of color" is offensive to black people. so if that was an effort to not offend anyone, you failed miserably.

second off, hip hop was a cultural movement. it was a way of life. it was not gangbanging, it was not even particular music. it was a movement that was supposed to motivate african american individuals through the community via expression. keyword being "motivate".

i keep using past tense because i think it's original meaning has been completely lost.

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okay i don't get this on this message board you hear people saying black people need to stop blaming "the man" or blaming other people for their struggles or actions and take responsibility for their own actions.

then

you get articles blaming the hip hop culture and some of those same people will say "right on" good article.

that's right!!! it's not the people who are in charge, and have been in charge for 100s of years. it's yung joc!

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ok fine. perfect example. jeremy shockey. completely overdoes it on the field, and in the locker room in terms of quotes and lashing out at his coaches, and other coaches & players around the league. also, comes from a school known for producing "thugs", and is tatted up. while he is thought of as a jerk; he is never refered to as a "thug" or a "hip-hop athlete".

good one...i think my hatred for him blanked him out of my memory.

my dialogue to my tv on monday....

(on the play where shockey tripped up hall)

"what a friggin vag!!! cant do nothing but trip my man? **** i hate you." (explitive, etc)

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the point is you hear the lyrics that doesn't mean you have to do it. if you choose to do it thats strictly on you and it's not on hip hop.

no, the point was that rap music is supposedly an editorial on urban youth, not a call to arms. i have listened to rev. al tell me that from his sanctimonious podium many times. "rap music is about life on the street" blah blah blah. therefore, the lyrics are telling me that this is what happens, not this is a suggestion for others to follow. which means that the news reports of club shootings are actaully what happens. and the lyrics in certain rap songs are describing life in urbania.

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ok fine. perfect example. jeremy shockey. completely overdoes it on the field, and in the locker room in terms of quotes and lashing out at his coaches, and other coaches & players around the league. also, comes from a school known for producing "thugs", and is tatted up. while he is thought of as a jerk; he is never refered to as a "thug" or a "hip-hop athlete".

neither is t.o. referred to as a "thug" or a "hip hop athlete" but he is thought by most to be a complete a-hole. what's your point?

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neither is t.o. referred to as a "thug" or a "hip hop athlete" but he is thought by most to be a complete a-hole. what's your point?

someone didnt read the article....

i have never thought that about to either... but apparently whitlock does.

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that's right!!! it's not the people who are in charge, and have been in charge for 100s of years. it's yung joc!

laugh.giflaugh.gif that's what they want us to believe anyway.

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ok fine. perfect example. jeremy shockey. completely overdoes it on the field, and in the locker room in terms of quotes and lashing out at his coaches, and other coaches & players around the league. also, comes from a school known for producing "thugs", and is tatted up. while he is thought of as a jerk; he is never refered to as a "thug" or a "hip-hop athlete".

i think because he isn't associated with criminal activity he's not thought of as a thug. and because he is listening to bands like slipknot at his locker would be why he isn't referred to as a hip hop athlete. just a guess though.

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wow. that's an interesting read.

i'm actually suprised that's the first time i've seen the stat about the rosters of the pats and colts.

didn't the nba make an effort to distance itself from the hip-hop culture or at least trying to distance it's image from it?

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no, the point was that rap music is supposedly an editorial on urban youth, not a call to arms. i have listened to rev. al tell me that from his sanctimonious podium many times. "rap music is about life on the street" blah blah blah. therefore, the lyrics are telling me that this is what happens, not this is a suggestion for others to follow. which means that the news reports of club shootings are actaully what happens. and the lyrics in certain rap songs are describing life in urbania.

you obviously don't get what i'm saying.

what i'm saying is people should take responsible for their own actions and stop blaming people and music for their actions. it's pretty simple if you ask me.

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thank you for that. had you not told me i would have never known that i'm an idiot. i owe you a debt of gratitude.

seriously, i never said i was blaming hip hop. i said that jason whitlock was blaming the hip-hop culture. really, though, thanks for pointing out that i'm such an idiot.

glad to be of assistance.

how can you separate hip hop and hip hop culture and blame one and not the other? do you think there would be a hip hop culture without hip hop? stop back tracking and bringing up other names. the issue with a lot of these players is a social issue related more to the evironment growing up than the music they listen to.

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and another thing. the type of hip-hop that all these people hate, and want to lump all hip-hop in with... it was born out of the filth. not the other way around. people didnt pick up guns and this hatred for authority because of hip-hop. it's the other way around. this came out of the struggles of the ghetto after crack decimated so many communities in the 80s. where once people had it rough, now became a warzone.

so even if we're going to talk about the "rap that you dont like". we better understand that, that type of music is a by-product of the **** that was/is the streets. not the cause of that ****.

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