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Found 13 results

  1. So overall I think this past year was a success despite the 29-53 record in year 1 for Pierce. The young guys played well for the most part and we were able to get guys like Len to play well in our system. Excited to see where next year takes us. We competed in a lot of games we lost too. As the year went along, we played better which is a very good sign. Trae Young averaged 19.1 PPG and 8.1 APG. His 3 ball was only around 33%, but he was up to around 35% after the all star break. That number is only going to get better IMO. Post ASG, he averaged 24.7 and 9.2 APG. He was 2nd in the NBA in assists and 5th in APG. John Collins averaged 19.5 PPG and 9.8 RPG. For a sophomore year player? Yeah, we've got us a star on our hands. Kevin Huerter averaged 10.5 PPG post ASG which is good too. He is only going to get better and get more comfortable. There were also positives to take away from a lot of over guys: Alex Len, Taurean Prince, Omari Spellman, and even Bembry showed progress (still mad about tonight though lol). We have a nice young core that is only going to get better. Some key offseason dates: April 21st: Final day for underclassmen to declare for the NBA draft May 14th: NBA draft lottery May 14th-9th: NBA Draft Combine May 29th: Final day for underclassmen to withdraw from the NBA draft June 10th: Final day for non-NCAA players to withdraw from the NBA draft June 20th: NBA draft July 1st: Free agency begins, but players can't sign yet Draft picks: 1(5)- ATL pick; 5th slot in lottery 1(7)- DAL pick; T-7th slot in lottery, top 5 protected 2(35)- ATL pick 2(41)- ATL pick 2(42)- ATL pick
  2. When reading the comments and the reaction of the fans, one couldn’t help seeing tthe shortsightedness of the fans. The Falcons had a pool of players to go after and this based on their research and resources. This process starts weeks before the draft starts—this is not like an overnight and on the go process. The fans are always dramatic and want the big names that get hyped up by the media and within NFL circles. Some of this hype is well-deserved based on the talent, but many times it is like steroids for hype and national attention. When you peel the process, the best teams go for pragmatic solutions. You invest in players that fit your style and believes. The Falcons KPI (Kep Performance Index/marketing world will know what I mean) or benchmarks are based on this: Character Athletism Data/Analytics Agility Smartness Expert Take-Scouting Coaches After using your benchmarks, you come up with a pool of players that fits those KPI’s or benchmarks. The Falcons selected those players based on data, analytics, and scouting take. This has nothing to do with TD making the decision over DQ or DQ taking the lead. The decisions are based on a cumulative basis. The Falcons knew that rhe OL was a major obstacle for the team. What is your biggest investment and your most important asset? It is Matt Ryan and protecting him was the main priority. You don’t have to be a rocket scientist to know that if you protect Matty Ice, you will get an offense that is going to be deadly and scoring points. The Falcons running game was affected by the shortfalls within the OL trenches. Finally, I bet Arthur Blank advised TD and DQ to make the OL a priority based on his take. The Falcons decided that protecting Matt Ryan and the running game needed a major facelift. The Falcons added two smart big guys to help that cause. Strategically, this makes sense in the long run. If you have a great offense, you can win many games with an average defense. The Falcons don’t need to be a Top 10 defense to win the Super Bowl, but a Top 15 will suffice. The fans need to realize that the Falcons added two major pieces to the offense that will be cost-effective and with the option of a 5-year contract. Tom Brady always excelled because it was hard to get to him and he had a great pocket protection. Matt Ryan needs pocket protection to be a great QB. The Falcons don’t have that many holes and some of the fans exaggerate the situation. The Defense will improve dramatically with DQ on the helm. He is going to push players like VIC and Tak. We will add couple of more pieces to the defense via the draft to solidify the team. In summary, The Falcons got bigger and beefy in the trenches which is something we haven’t seen in a longtime. The OL should become one of the Falcons most improved unit and it will help the Offense to be a Top 5 offense with weapons like MR, Julio, Freeman, Sani, Hooper and Calvin. We need to believe in the process by logic and not emotions. The Falcons are primed to be one of the best team in the NFC next year and a team that is one of the most talented. Keep the faith and #RiseUp...
  3. I like the 1st guard, especially after you missed out Christian Wilkins, but giving up 2nd and 3rd round picks for an extra O-lineman late in the 1st round who we don't know is going to be like? I'm gonna be honest, but.... WHY THE **** WASN'T THIS LAST YEAR'S DRAFT AND FREE AGENCY!? Had we done all of that last year we would have focused on a lot of defense this year, and Deandre Baker going to the Giants late in the 1st round. Not surprised there.
  4. Before you lose your cookies... We just took the best guard in the draft. People are complaining we're "stacked" at guard/OL. You know who won a Super Bowl because of great guards/OL? Brees. Brady. You name it. We FINALLY take a pick to protect Matt, and one that is as close to a guaranteed pick as you'll get at 14. Plus the side note of him being from BC. Perspective. It helps. Edit: seeing people saying we could have gotten him later.. how? We playing what ifs? What about trading back? What if we couldn't find a good trade partner? What if we had good intel that Taylor & Ford weren't fits for a few teams and they were eyeing Lindstrom? What if he was just by far the best OG, or even OL, they saw after interviews, etc.? You can play what ifs all day. People called Neal a reach at 17 too. Edit #2: Aaaaand Taylor has knee concerns, Howard got taken over him. Ford still on board (even though he's not as refined or able to play T like Lindstrom). Troffed?
  5. Basically, what the title says, if we had who we thought could be/become top tier in this defense (those last 3 words are important) at nearly every position on defense sitting there at 14, who would you pick and why? Which position, if picked, would most put this defense over the top? A DL "Gap Penetrator"? A Tough big body NT type? A "Michael Bennett type" Edge rusher who can move inside? A "speedy" bend around the edge type rusher? A top tier WLB? A top coverage CB? A "rangy" top tier Free Safety? Note: I left out MLB and SS because I made these choices based off of who I generally see this board saying we need the most, the players that I most see people saying we need to get our defense over the hump. (Deion and Neal seem to be accepted as being satisfactory at their positions) If you have another type that you really think that I should add to the poll, say so, and I will try to accommodate depending.
  6. https://www.atlantafalcons.com/news/peter-king-talks-falcons-who-needs-to-step-top-draft-priority-and-the-x-factor-i Kelsey Conway AtlantaFalcons.com reporter FLOWERY BRANCH, Ga. – If you were to ask longtime NFL writer Peter King which team he’d be most inclined to buy stock in at this point in the offseason, his answer might surprise you. Let’s just say the Atlanta Falcons would definitely be in the conversation. “I’d be buying Falcons stock right now because I think they’ve got a chance to rebound and play very well this year in what again is going to be a very tough NFC South,” King said. King detailed several reasons why he’s “bullish” on the Falcons in a 17-minute Q&A from the annual league meetings last week in Phoenix. Here are some of King’s takes: Quinn taking over defense will give Falcons ‘more aggressive’ play, including the secondary With Dan Quinn taking back the reigns of the Falcons’ defense, there’s a newfound excitement surrounding Atlanta’s defense. Based off Quinn’s time as a defensive coordinator in Seattle and when he took over the play-calling in the final quarter of the 2016 season, King laid out his expectations of what he thinks the Falcons’ defense will look like with Quinn calling the shots. “I think by the more active role he has in a week-to-week basis with the defense, you’re probably going to get to see more of an aggressive defense,” King said. “I think he will find more opportunities for Grady Jarrett, I think he’s going to find more opportunities for edge players. I think you’re going to see more diverse secondary play. More guys rushing from the secondary.” Takk McKinley is the player the Falcons need to step up most in 2019 All eyes will be on Takk McKinley this year and there’s no doubt about it. Since being drafted in the first round of the 2017 NFL Draft, the expectations for McKinley have certainly heightened. Not only has Quinn said he’s expecting a strong offseason from McKinley to prepare for the upcoming season, King explained why it’s vital for the defensive end to have a big year. “He was drafted to be [the] really strong edge presence,” King said. If I’m them, I need 50-to-60 legitimate quarterback disruptions from McKinley this year. I think that is vital because I think they’re secondary [could] get exposed. This is a crucial year for this secondary and for the pass rush.” Falcons draft priorities should be improving the secondary, landing another franchise tackle The Falcons have the No. 14 overall pick in the NFL Draft and King believes they should use it on a player who can improve their secondary. Atlanta’s secondary will look a bit different this season with Isaiah Oliver and Damontae Kazee taking on starting roles full-time. “If I were the Falcons, [my priority] would be the secondary,” King said. “I would want to improve my cornerback depth and I would also draft if I can what I consider to be a long-term offensive tackle. King also believes the Falcons could also benefit from using that pick on one of the top tackles in this year’s draft class, similar to what they did with Jake Matthews in the 2014 NFL Draft when Atlanta selected him with the No. 6 overall pick. Matthews signed a five-year extension with the Falcons prior to the 2018 season. Alex Mack is the ultimate X-factor for Falcons King knows exactly which center he would pick if he had the luxury of choosing one in a must-win game. “I’d take Alex Mack every time,” King said. “I love Mack.” Based on Ryan’s consistent production over the years, King’s not worried about what the Falcons will get from QB1 in 2019. “I always look at Ryan as a guy in my opinion, I just think every year he’s going to be a top-5 quarterback,” King said. “He’s going to be productive enough.” What will help Ryan have another quality year is the play of the guy directly in front of him snapping him the ball and blocking for him. “Any quarterback is going to play better when he’s protected better,” King said. “They just have to do a better job of doing that this year whether that’s scheme or talent. I think it’s vitally important that Alex Mack be healthy and give them one more strong year. You can just see the symbiotic relationship between Mack and Ryan.” Falcons can’t let Deion Jones out of Atlanta The Falcons have reportedly begun contract negotiations with Deion Jones who has quickly become one of the best players in Atlanta’s defense. King believes Jones is a player who could be the heart of Atlanta’s defense for years to come. “I love Deion Jones as a football player and I would want him to be the centerpiece of my defense,” King said. “They can’t let him go. “ The ultimate compliment to Grady Jarrett After defeating the Falcons 34-28 in Super Bowl LI, King sat with Patriots’ star quarterback Tom Brady and to discuss the game in which Brady couldn’t have been more complementary of Grady Jarrett. “Tom Brady had more respect for Grady Jarrett than anybody on the Falcons that day,” King said. “I think the world of Grady Jarrett.” Emphasis added. I like how he thinks, and has at least studied a little..
  7. The more I think about it, the more I think Cody Ford is our guy at 14. Brings toughness to the trenches and immediately upgrades our OL. In an offense loaded with skill players, this pick totally makes sense. I do not want us to trade up for Oliver. McClure reported we are heavily interested in ford and have had a formal meeting as well.
  8. I posted a full mock on the NFL Draft & FA forum here, but thought I would share my bold idea for the 1st round here... "If you're going to think, think big. If you're going to think big, think bigger". Going into the draft most at this point are agreed that our 2 biggest needs are OL and DT. Sure, we could do with better depth at CB, LB, RB and you can never have enough pass rushers but 95% of the posters on here are leaning towards DT or OL with #14. Looking at who the FO have shown an interest in so far it does indeed look like we will go that direction. Assuming the board falls the right way, with nine 2019 draft picks to play with and a GM/HC combo who are in win-now mode, I think we can and should be aggressive. 1st Round 1. Arizona - Kyler Murray, QB 2. San Francisco - Nick Bosa, DE 3. NY Jets - Quinnen Williams, DT 4. Oakland - Josh Allen, Edge 5. Tampa Bay - Devin White, LB 6. NY Giants - Dwayne Haskins, QB 7. Jacksonville - Rashan Gary, DT/DE 8. Detroit - Montez Sweat, Edge 9. Buffalo - DK Metcalf, WR 10. Denver - Drew Lock, QB 11. Cincinnati - Cody Ford, OL 12. Green Bay - Brian Burns, Edge -------- WE HAVE A TRADE -------- The Atlanta Falcons have traded #45 (450 points), #79 (195 points) and a 2020 1st round pick (~500 points) to the Miami Dolphins for #13 (1150 points). This makes sense for Miami who after failing to draft their franchise QB, they acquire an additional 2020 1st round pick in what should be a far stronger class for QB's. For a team in full rebuild mode an additional 2nd and 3rd round pick helps do that. For the Falcons, this makes sense as 2019 is a top heavy draft, particularly in the two major positions of need and with nine picks to play with in 2019, expect for TD to be his normal aggressive self in trading up to get the guys we want. 13. Atlanta - Jawaan Taylor, OL, Florida 14. Atlanta - Ed Oliver, DT, Houston
  9. Tore his mother****ing ACL!!! Maybe we can get him later in the draft now??!!!
  10. I know a number of people here are all in on the DL train in the draft and cringe at the thought of drafting a RT in the first round because you don't draft non-left tackle offensive linemen in the first round. I'm here, with the help of FiveThirtyEight, to provide some insight as to why that's a foolish way of think in today's NFL. As the bolded points out, there is no true "blindside" any more. Some of the best RTs in the league played LT coming out of college. Ramcyzk and Schwartz were LTs in college. Lane Johnson was also a LT in college. On the other hand, Ryan Schraeder, who we saw fall plain off a cliff this year, is a RT only from what I gathered about his time in college. I think this is part of why he tanked the last two years, being a classic RT versus a former LT who is used to facing top tier pass rushers on an island. As some have alluded to Toilolo helping Schraeder, I think there is some truth to that potentially. Regardless, I think the team has to move on from Schraeder and treat the RT spot like they did when we were looking at Matthews at #6. The NFL has changed drastically since 2016 and we need to revamp the OL to match that. Especially with the various OCs we have building this offense. I also think that's why Sambrailo looked fairly decent all things considered. One, he's had time to settle in, get healthy, and actually develop. But secondly, he's a former LT. All things considered though, don't be opposed to taking a stud OT at #14 or a large contract in FA. This draft is very deep with DL, but not so with guys who can play 1000+ snaps at RT.
  11. So it looks like come end of next football Sunday when the season ends for the Falcons the Best pick they can have is 5th the worse they can have is 16(unless denver wins tomorrow then the number becomes 15). All in All the team if they draft the right players should still be in position to get a potential Allstar player
  12. We are currently in slot #5 in the draft with that giants win.
  13. Well, it’s time we finally admit the truth about this franchise. By Cory Woodroof @CoryWoodroof47 Dec 12, 2018, 8:00am EST Leodis McKelvin was right. The Atlanta Falcons are, have been, and for the immediate future, will be front-runners. Go back to 2016 with me, if you will. The Falcons had just lost to the Philadelphia Eagles, one of the team’s few 2016 regular season flops. The game showed what happened when the historic offense met a fierce defensive front. The team was held to 15 points on offense and lost control of the game’s tempo, which sunk the explosive mentality the team thrived on way back when. Post-game, McKelvin uttered the awful truth no one wanted to believe at a time where things were about to break even for Atlanta in the biggest way possible. “I was telling the defense, this is the type of team, they are a front-runner. They are a front-running team,” he told reporters (via ESPN). “If you go out there and make some stops, they eventually are going to be dying down.” The quote, at the time, was great bulletin board material for a team that surely used that moment to jettison to a better place (well, almost). But its the most telling observation about this franchise ever relayed by an opponent, and the defining problem of this team in the post-Michael Vick era. The Falcons are front-runners. They do wilt at immediate adversity. Slow them down, knock them out of the fight. It’s how it’s always been, and 2018 is that in grand amplification. Let’s go back to any big moment in recent team history. Looking Back The 2010 season ended in the divisional round with Aaron Rodgers coming out, guns blazing, to stop the Falcons after they got out to an early 14-7 start to see 35 unanswered points derail a promising campaign. The 2012 season ended with a collapsed lead in the NFC Championship to the 49ers that kept the team from going to its second Super Bowl. The week prior, they did the exact same thing to the Seahawks, but the mighty foot of Matt Bryant saved pain for a week later. In February 2017, well, we won’t go there. Look at the 2013 season, when, after a rash of injuries, the entire half decade of goodwill seemingly evaporated and led to the end of an era with the firing of Mike Smith in 2014. Look at the 2015 season, when the team let a few close games gather moss down the rolling hill to lose six straight. Look at the 2011 season, when the team fell flat at the Meadowlands by only scoring two points. Look at January’s Eagles debacle. Want more examples? Google: “Falcons blow lead regular season.” Sometimes, in large part thanks to Matt Ryan, they can fight their way back for the comeback. But we haven’t seen that much as of late. And it still doesn’t discount the fact that they had to be in that situation to begin with. The team’s problems haven’t changed once since 2008. They can’t handle teams with stout trenches, and the teams with strong run games and even stronger defensive lines always win out against the Birds when the things get close. The Falcons never seem to find success in addressing their own trenches, which have both been decent at the best since the turn of the millennium. The team can’t handle compounding injuries, they can’t handle blown leads, they can’t handle what happens when things go wrong. They have to have everything in place to succeed. It’s never quite broken even in their favor. They’ve gotten close, but not quite. Why is that? Why is it this team can’t get into the tough moments and box out a win? Why can’t this team withstand injuries? Why can’t this team hold a lead? Why does this team spend so much time worrying about rising up? What about staying up when the punches come in bunches? Don’t throw around curses, or “that’s just the way it is,” or more jargon about this or that with the team’s history. This is football, not World of Warcraft. You’re not bound to some ancient hex or manifest destiny. It’s just a game, and anyone can fix anything at any time to win whatever they want to win. The Falcons are front-runners, and it’s time for Dan Quinn and Thomas Dimitroff to fix that. Looking Within Quinn has helped solve some of that problem of the team being accused of being a finesse outfit. He drafted guys like Deion Jones, Keanu Neal, Takkarist McKinley and Grady Jarrett to change the mentality. He wanted guys who were fast and physical; we all know that. For the most part, he’s gotten that exact result. But this team never seems to escape this belief that it’s, as Fox Sports’ Nick Wright said after the team lost in Philly in January, “a soft, finesse dome team.” Is it time we all start taking that moniker seriously? Is this just who the Falcons are, at least right now? Are they really just birds of comfort? These old legacy teams like the Patriots, Packers, Steelers, Bears, Giants, Broncos, Eagles, Dolphins ... the win-in-the-elements, smack-you-down, mean-machine outfits who can win with two teeth, a busted jaw, and a broken leg. We’ve seen the Falcons play tough in this Quinn era, so that total perception isn’t quite true. But we’ve seen them wilt down the stretch too many times in equal measure, often to these types of teams who keep swinging even when the Falcons seemingly have them pinned. The Falcons saw their greatest weakness send them home from Houston without a trophy. They faded down the stretch in the franchise’s most important moment in the exact way McKelvin said they would. The Patriots got some stops, got a few scores, and whammo, a 28-3 lead disappears like a thief in the night. The Patriots didn’t steal the Super Bowl; the Falcons gave it away. They couldn’t overcome their grandest problem, and it stole the greatest victory a football team can achieve. Looking ahead This team has been a front-runner for as long as I can remember, unable to handle the smallest dose of adversity. The team rebounding after 2017’s Super Bowl fracas to get to the divisional round was an incredible feat, but they had time to plan. Quinn has been wondrous about fixing problems in the offseason and letting the team grow. He’ll most likely do that this spring. But when new problems pop up in-season, the team just doesn’t seem to have the wherewithal to withstand them. It happens time after time. The Falcons have to have everything break their way in order to achieve ultimate success. If that doesn’t happen, neither do the Falcons. The rare example of this came in 2016, when the team lost Desmond Trufant to injury, and Jalen Collins stepped up. The team did get the benefit of having Quinn take the plays over in that stretch, which gave them the defensive boost they needed. Collins is gone now, and Quinn hasn’t called the plays since the Super Bowl. But what would’ve happened that year if the team had gotten more banged up? Well, you saw down the stretch. What will the Falcons have to do to fix this? Who knows. It’s not something you can just pinpoint to fix through the draft, or in free agency, or with a coaching change. The entire mentality of the organization has to change, the players you bring in have to have fight in them, the entire team has to have a strong left hook and a nasty counter-punch. No matter the eventual solution, McKelvin called it two years ago. He doesn’t have to stay right, though. If the Falcons want a Super Bowl, they’re going to have to figure out how to be tough and resilient ... no, not in general. When it counts. It’s time for the Falcons to break away from the front-running mentality. It’s time for them to shed the dome-friendly visage. It’s time for them to be 100% tough. It’s time for the Atlanta Falcons to get a backbone. Here’s desperately hoping they find one.