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  1. Having read the article below this is how I see our current front 7 depth chart. What stands out to me is that all of our players seem to fit for what is required to make this a success, at least on paper. For example the description of the LEO fits Beasley perfectly. What do you guys think? NT: Hageman, Soliai DT: Babineax, Jarrett LDE: Clayborn, Goodman/Jackson LEO: Beasley, Schofield/Biermann SAM: Reed, Shembo MIKE: Worrilow... WILL: Durant, Bartu Creating the Position Archetypes Having re-written an entire new scheme from scratch, Carroll had to also re-write each position on the front seven's strengths, responsibilities and attributes he was looking for in his players. Below is a compilation of what he wanted in his defensive positions during his time in USC: (Note how the language he uses is an equal mix between what you hear in a 4-3 and what you hear in a 3-4) On the "One-Technique" Nose Guard: "The nose tackle plays in the A gap to the tight end side of the field in our defense. We have done a number of things with this position based upon the opposition at times. We have put him right in the A gap, we have cocked him on the center at times, and as needed we have even played him in a direct shade technique right over the center at times. The way we play him on base defense is as an inside-foot to outside-foot alignment or a 1 technique on the center to the strong side of the alignment." "At Nose Tackle you have to find a player who likes to mix it up. We want a big guy in there who likes to get down and dirty. He is going to get doubled a lot on the run and pass and is going to get down blocked a lot. He has to be a tough player. This guy can be a short and stubby type of player." On the Three-Technique: "The prime spot on the defense to the weak side is the B gap player. He is an inside-foot to outside-foot alignment on the offensive guard to his side. He is a 3 technique player. He has B gap control but he can't get reached or hooked by the defense due to the way we align him. The whole scheme of this defense is predicated upon not getting hooked." "The 3 technique player should be your premier interior pass rusher. He is going to get a lot of one on one blocks as it is hard to double team him because of where he lines up." On the "Five-Technique": "The defensive end to the tight end side needs to be a defensive player that can play the run. He does not have to be a big time pass rusher, but he has to play the C gap and stop the run. [He] must works for leverage and force and allow the Free Safety to work off of the him and fills where he is needed on run plays. On the LEO: "The best pass rusher on the team is usually the defensive end to the openside of the field. That puts him on the quarterback's blind side and makes him a C gap player in this defense. We often align him wider than this in order to give him a better angle of attack and allow him to play in space. We align him a yard outside of the offensive tackle most of the time. He has to play C gap run support but at the same time he is rushing the passer like it is third and ten. He has to be able to close down however if the tackle blocks down on him." "(He) has to be one of your best football players. Size does not matter as much. We want an athletic player who can move around." On the SAM: "The Sam linebacker controls the D gap to his side of the field. He is in an inside-foot to outside-foot alignment on the tight end or what most coaches call a 9 technique spot. He can never get reach blocked by the tight end in this position. "He is the force player for everything run to his side of the field and turns everything back inside to the pursuit. Often he has the tight end in man to man in coverage. He has him anywhere he goes for this defensive call. He never switches if we are in this coverage and will go with him if the tight end does go in motion. He also has to be a good containment player. He has to be big and strong enough to play on the edge of the tight end. He has to be able to run in pass coverage also." On the MIKE: "The Mike linebacker is in an inside-foot to out-side foot alignment on the offensive guard on his side of the field. He's a traditional middle linebacker. He is instinctive and makes a lot of calls for the defense. He may be the guy with the most experience or the best feel for the game." On the WILL: "The Will linebacker is aligned against the offensive guard to his side of the field. He is basically a protected player in this alignment and should make a lot of tackles. He has to control his weak-side A gap and play relative to the Mike linebacker and the Free Safety. In coverage, he often plays the short middle. "The Will linebacker can be a smaller player. He is generally protected in the defensive schemes and will not see as many blocks. All you want him to do most plays is flow and chase the football. We want our fastest linebacker at this position." http://www.fieldgulls.com/football-breakdowns/2013/5/13/4320540/defining-the-seahawks-defense-an-introduction
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