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RedandBlack4ever

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  1. Like
    RedandBlack4ever reacted to Draftnut57 in The Featured Julio Thread   
    On your bottom line,,, The great thing about Julio is that he was the best deco we ever had.. Which would open up Ridley and other the Other WRs .  So he was always a part of the yardage we got to the WRs even if he was not the one to get the ball. Bottom line.. he did help get it done even when he was not the target. 
  2. Downvote
    RedandBlack4ever got a reaction from ⚡Slumerican⚡ in The Featured Julio Thread   
    I found the articles on the Atlanta Falcons page on yardbarker.com can somebody tell me if that is a reliable site. They have alot of articles everyday. Here is the latest if it's a bad site let me know and I won't post anymore. I've been a member since before the first super bowl and still counted as a new member. I always read the forums but never post.
    Falcons were reportedly offered a first-round pick for Julio Jones, but not for next year
    Originally posted on SportsTalkATL  |  By Chase Irle  |  Last updated 6/4/21 At this point, I totally understand if you’re completely lost when it comes to the Julio Jones trade rumors. Some outlets are saying the Falcons will get a first-round pick and unload his entire salary, others say teams are offering a mid-round pick and asking Atlanta to eat a large portion of Jones’ salary. The truth most likely lies somewhere in the middle.
    It was reported last week by ESPN’s Dianna Russini that the Falcons have a first-round pick on the table for Jones.
      That very well may be true, but it doesn’t look like that first-round pick was for the next draft in 2022. Chris Mortenson reportedly said on 680 The Fan this afternoon that Atlanta was offered a first-round pick but it was for a future draft — I would assume in 2023.
    If I had to guess, the Falcons are probably debating between a 2023 first-round selection or a 2022 second-round pick. In either scenario, I would expect Terry Fontenot to rid of most — if not all — of Jones’ salary. Atlanta may seem desperate to trade Julio because of what occurred on FS1’s Undisputed, but they technically don’t have to. Terry Fontenot isn’t going to accept some lowball offer. This is a pivotal moment for a first-year GM, and he has to get it right. Accepting a mid-round pick and eating salary for one of the best receivers in the league is certainly not getting it right.
  3. Like
    RedandBlack4ever reacted to A Dog Named Brian in The Featured Julio Thread   
    Ya know… The more I think of what he brings to the table, the more I’m convinced we aren’t going to be hurtin’ if he’s gone. Our ultimate goal is to win a Super Bowl, he’s been in the league ten years now and how many Super Bowls has he had played in? One; we still lost. 
    Point being he’s a great player whose value might be getting overinflated by the media and some on here. The way he’s being touted we should have ten Lombardi’s by now. A lot of our past issues are larger than one player, it’s been coaching. This is the ultimate team sport and while he is great at what he does, he’s not necessary to bring home the hardware. 
    All that being said, I’m not going to be upset if he’s gone but if he stays he needs to humble himself after everything that has happened the past few weeks and put in the work; I know his teammates (as well as fans) would love to see him still here. 
  4. Like
    RedandBlack4ever got a reaction from Herr Doktor in The Featured Julio Thread   
    Falcons reportedly mulling lowball offer for Julio Jones
    Originally posted on SportsTalkATL  |  By Alex Lord  |  Last updated 6/4/21 Josina Anderson, who is the host of Undefined, reported from a source last night that a team involved in the Julio Jones sweepstakes said, “everyone is giving (the Falcons) time to think about it…” Anderson mentioned that these comments come from a team that prefers to deal a high mid-round pick for Jones, while Terry Fontenot also absorbs a “good share” of the seven-time Pro Bowler’s salary.
    It’s becoming clear that the Falcons will have to choose between maximum financial relief and maximum draft capital. Teams aren’t going to want to give up a first-round pick without Atlanta taking on a share of the contract, but they seem to be willing to part ways with a second or third-round pick and take on the entirety of the contract.
    I’m not saying I agree with any of this. It’s just my take from the information provided. In reality, Fontenot shouldn’t and likely won’t trade the All-Pro receiver away for a bag of rocks. The entire point of this trade is to provide salary cap relief, and if Fontenot has to eat some of Jones’s salary, what’s the point? This can be a difficult situation for a first-time general manager, but I believe Fontenot won’t blink.
    I think Fontenot would rather have a disgruntled Jones on the roster knowing he might sit out rather than take some lowball offer to set the precedent general managers around the league can take advantage of him. He doesn’t seem like that type of individual. A “high mid-rounder” isn’t even close to what Julio Jones is worth, and if that’s what the market is baring, then I don’t think he’ll be traded.
  5. Like
    RedandBlack4ever got a reaction from Draftnut57 in The Featured Julio Thread   
    Falcons reportedly mulling lowball offer for Julio Jones
    Originally posted on SportsTalkATL  |  By Alex Lord  |  Last updated 6/4/21 Josina Anderson, who is the host of Undefined, reported from a source last night that a team involved in the Julio Jones sweepstakes said, “everyone is giving (the Falcons) time to think about it…” Anderson mentioned that these comments come from a team that prefers to deal a high mid-round pick for Jones, while Terry Fontenot also absorbs a “good share” of the seven-time Pro Bowler’s salary.
    It’s becoming clear that the Falcons will have to choose between maximum financial relief and maximum draft capital. Teams aren’t going to want to give up a first-round pick without Atlanta taking on a share of the contract, but they seem to be willing to part ways with a second or third-round pick and take on the entirety of the contract.
    I’m not saying I agree with any of this. It’s just my take from the information provided. In reality, Fontenot shouldn’t and likely won’t trade the All-Pro receiver away for a bag of rocks. The entire point of this trade is to provide salary cap relief, and if Fontenot has to eat some of Jones’s salary, what’s the point? This can be a difficult situation for a first-time general manager, but I believe Fontenot won’t blink.
    I think Fontenot would rather have a disgruntled Jones on the roster knowing he might sit out rather than take some lowball offer to set the precedent general managers around the league can take advantage of him. He doesn’t seem like that type of individual. A “high mid-rounder” isn’t even close to what Julio Jones is worth, and if that’s what the market is baring, then I don’t think he’ll be traded.
  6. Like
    RedandBlack4ever reacted to Thiccolas Cage in The Featured Julio Thread   
    I just can't get over the fact that the 'talking heads' act like we have to trade him or owe something to another club. That is probably the most frustrating point to me as-if the entire org is a pushover.
  7. Like
    RedandBlack4ever got a reaction from Thiccolas Cage in The Featured Julio Thread   
    Falcons reportedly mulling lowball offer for Julio Jones
    Originally posted on SportsTalkATL  |  By Alex Lord  |  Last updated 6/4/21 Josina Anderson, who is the host of Undefined, reported from a source last night that a team involved in the Julio Jones sweepstakes said, “everyone is giving (the Falcons) time to think about it…” Anderson mentioned that these comments come from a team that prefers to deal a high mid-round pick for Jones, while Terry Fontenot also absorbs a “good share” of the seven-time Pro Bowler’s salary.
    It’s becoming clear that the Falcons will have to choose between maximum financial relief and maximum draft capital. Teams aren’t going to want to give up a first-round pick without Atlanta taking on a share of the contract, but they seem to be willing to part ways with a second or third-round pick and take on the entirety of the contract.
    I’m not saying I agree with any of this. It’s just my take from the information provided. In reality, Fontenot shouldn’t and likely won’t trade the All-Pro receiver away for a bag of rocks. The entire point of this trade is to provide salary cap relief, and if Fontenot has to eat some of Jones’s salary, what’s the point? This can be a difficult situation for a first-time general manager, but I believe Fontenot won’t blink.
    I think Fontenot would rather have a disgruntled Jones on the roster knowing he might sit out rather than take some lowball offer to set the precedent general managers around the league can take advantage of him. He doesn’t seem like that type of individual. A “high mid-rounder” isn’t even close to what Julio Jones is worth, and if that’s what the market is baring, then I don’t think he’ll be traded.
  8. Haha
    RedandBlack4ever reacted to JayOzOne in Ollison news for fans   
    OMG. It's that time of year again. Wake me when training camp begins.
  9. Like
    RedandBlack4ever reacted to thanat0s in Ollison news for fans   
    Hopefully he shows something this summer and can earn more pt.
  10. Like
    RedandBlack4ever reacted to thanat0s in Can Pees help this Defense obtain 2+ sacks a game?   
    Well, it's not so bad as 40 ppg, but they do give up 25, which needs to be shaved by 4-5 this year for us to have success. With the easier schedule, that could be doable.
  11. Like
    RedandBlack4ever reacted to ATLskinjob in Can Pees help this Defense obtain 2+ sacks a game?   
    I think we can add those sacks. I think this defense is going to do really well with the blitz from every position type of scheme. We have a ton of really athletic players, and Pees has run some really really good defenses that have been the major factor in Super Bowl wins.
    I feel cautiously optimistic too. 
  12. Like
    RedandBlack4ever reacted to Foo Falcons in Can Pees help this Defense obtain 2+ sacks a game?   
    To yearn for 2+ sacks a game seems ridiculous, but our most recent years have shown that would be welcomed. If we can get 38-48 sacks this year then that helps tremendously with a young secondary. Factor in 10-15 INTs and we can very well be a top 20 Defense. We're young and growing pains will show, but turnovers and sacks make a big difference. 
    Thank God for us bringing in Pees and his experience. Couldn't have picked a better hire, kudos ASmith. I believe under Pees we can be a bend but don't break Defense. I can see us holding opponents to 23 or less PPG while our Offense should average 28+. 
    Cautiously optimistic should be the approach this year, but we have the makings of a stable staff and roster. Things are looking up. Don't let the Julio drama effect your optimism of the future with this new regime. 
  13. Thanks
    RedandBlack4ever got a reaction from V-Town Falcon in Happy Birthday to our Head Coach, Arthur Smith   
    Happy Birthday Coach Smith!!!!  Ready to see how high you can get the Falcons to soar..  We're all behind you and ready to see you bring us a Lombardi.
  14. Like
    RedandBlack4ever reacted to 1989Fan in Adam Schein’s 9 Bold Predictions (NFL.com)   
    So I am generally not a huge fan of Schein, but it’s a read. A refreshing read...yes a read that is entangled in the Julio Jones saga, but a positive perspective.
    https://www.nfl.com/news/bold-predictions-for-2021-nfl-season-aaron-rodgers-lifts-broncos-julio-jones-fue
     
    the rest in is the link, including a snippet about who he sees Julio balling out for, and a laughable compensation package for A-Rod.
    5) The Falcons win 10 games without Julio Jones
    I'd never trade Julio myself, but it appears that's where we're headed. Sad for Falcons fans, but on the bright side, I do like the overall outlook in Atlanta with Arthur Smith taking the reins as head coach.
    Smith is the right guy to maximize the offensive talent beyond Julio. Think about what he did in Tennessee, turning Ryan Tannehill, Derrick Henry and A.J. Brown into a prolific trio. Having just turned 36, Matt Ryan still has plenty left in the tank. Under Smith, I think we'll get a quarterback closer to the guy we saw in Atlanta under Kyle Shanahan -- you know, when Ryan won MVP? Smith coaches up tight ends beautifully, and now he has an absolute freak at the position in Kyle Pitts. Calvin Ridley has already shown he can excel as a WR1, balling out while Julio was injured last season. And overall, Smith brings the kind of winning attitude -- and ability to finish -- that has been lacking in recent years for the Falcons.
       
  15. Like
    RedandBlack4ever reacted to Gee-Q in The Featured Julio Thread   
    How dramatic can you be....
    Hostage?  For expecting a player to live up to the contract that they dearly wanted.. not even 2 years ago??
    I completely agree with ATL if they decide to not trade Julio.  
  16. Like
    RedandBlack4ever reacted to Lowndesfalc in Matt Ryan interview with Albert Breer MMQB   
    https://www.si.com/nfl/2021/05/24/mmqb-matt-ryan-atlanta-falcons-uncertain-offseason-good-place
     
    MMQB: How Matt Ryan Came Out of an Uncertain Offseason in a Good Place
    When the Falcons' quarterback found out his replacement hadn't been drafted, he'd already put in the work to start this new phase of his career. Plus, Phase III of offseason workouts begin, how the Russell Wilson drama settled down and much more. ALBERT BREER 2 HOURS AGO In one way, the Falcons’ new bosses were very transparent with Matt Ryan ahead of April 29, telling the 13-year vet that they’d look at all positions—quarterback included—with the fourth pick in the draft.
    In another way, they really weren’t. Coach Arthur Smith and GM Terry Fontenot were front-and-center at pro days for Trevor Lawrence, Zach Wilson, Trey Lance, Justin Fields and Mac Jones (and brought offensive coordinator Dave Ragone with them), and did all the same work the Jaguars, Jets, Niners, Bears and Patriots did before taking those quarterbacks in the first round.
    The idea, of course, was for the Falcons to know exactly what they were passing on if they chose not to take one of those guys at No. 4. And if a nice byproduct for Smith and Fontenot was keeping the rest of the league in the dark, well, then it worked on Ryan too. Because he didn’t have any more of an idea what was written on Atlanta’s card when it was turned in around 9 p.m. ET than anyone else watching at home.
    “When the pick went in, that was the big [moment],” Ryan said the other day, over the phone. “To the organization’s credit, they were very up-front about that from the start—Hey, we’re gonna pick whoever we think is the best person to help us moving forward. And they said they had a lot of belief and all those things, but they were up-front from the start about that. So I knew when Kyle got drafted that Kyle got drafted.”

    Kyle, of course, is Kyle Pitts, the freaky tight end the Falcons took to help Ryan—rather than selecting someone meant to replace him. He was the first nonquarterback to get picked and, as you’d expect, the pick brought a mixture of excitement and relief to the Ryan living room, and maybe even more so from other family members than the erstwhile Atlanta quarterback himself. “I was fired up!” Ryan said, with his voice rising. “I mean, I watched this guy play through college, so it was like, Oh, alright, let’s go! I was watching it with my wife, and I think she was probably more fired up than me.”
    That Ryan’s wife got a chance to exhale in a “we probably won’t have to move soon now” sort of way is totally understandable.
    That said, to be fair, it would also be understandable if Ryan had taken any of this personally. Everyone would get it if he was a little put off by seeing the Falcons’ open flirtations with quarterbacks 14 and 15 years his junior. No one would be surprised if, over the last three months, with all this happening, Ryan started to eye the exit, because we’ve seen that from so many other quarterbacks the last six months.
    But Ryan’s approach to the whole thing was just different. And he’s excited now coming out of all of it, and thinking that the new guys in charge who told him what they were doing, while not really telling him what they were doing, have a good shot to set him up for another run of title shots with his career hitting the fourth quarter.
    We’re inching closer to real football—organized team activities (or OTAs) start this week, which traditionally has meant, really, the start of football practice for NFL players. This year will definitely look a little different, and we’re covering all that in this week’s MMQB. Inside the column, you’ll find … • A team-by-team look at work conditions players have negotiated with their coaches.
    • A Russell Wilson reset.
    • The next big coaching prize in the college ranks for the NFL.
    And we’ll have a bunch of guys to watch in the coming weeks, too. But we’re starting in Atlanta, where the organization set a new course the last five months—one that now has a 36-year-old quarterback squarely in the middle of it.
    Really, the story of Ryan’s offseason starts with who he is. His play’s been steady as things have come undone around him over the last three years (at least 65% as a passer, a 90-plus QB rating, 4,400-plus yards and 26-plus touchdown passes in each season). He just turned 36, which is old for an NFL player but not ancient for a quarterback. He was the league MVP and in the Super Bowl five seasons ago.
    So as the Falcons underwent the most significant change of Ryan’s career—essentially blowing up their football operation and starting over—it would’ve been no shocker to see him start to get wandering eyes or distance himself from the new bosses. Throwing the fourth pick into the equation only added a layer of intrigue to that, in effect giving Smith and Fontenot an escape hatch from the Ryan era if they wanted to push the button on it. We’ve seen it, of late. Whether it was Deshaun Watson’s being disgruntled over the Texans’ organizational instability; Aaron Rodgers’ being turned off by the Packers’ drafting Jordan Love and continuing to build methodically; or Russell Wilson’s pushing for better protection, a better scheme, and a bigger voice in team decision-making, there’s no question dynamics are changing at the sport’s most important position. 
    And this isn’t to take away from how those guys are approaching their own situations. Ryan himself certainly didn’t when we talked. But the way he handled his own choppy waters was decidedly different.
    “Most guys deal with this,” Ryan said. “It gets made a really big deal at the quarterback position. But most players are dealing with this every year, right? Everybody deals with this at times. We don’t get hired to get to retired. They hire you and then fire you. They keep moving on. You just gotta stay in that space of, I’m gonna get myself ready to go, regardless of what happens. I’m gonna make sure I’m giving myself every opportunity to be the best player that I can be.”
    Which doesn’t mean Ryan didn’t hear the speculation about his job security—from the time before Smith and Fontenot were hired, when the question was whether Ryan would be in Atlanta at all, to after their hires, when the question shifted to whether those two would draft his replacement and put him on the clock. “Of course, you hear everything,” Ryan continued. “It’s become impossible to isolate yourself. It was much easier in 2008, ’09 to do it. It’s really impossible now, so you hear everything. I think just learning how to care less about that stuff, about what’s constantly being talked about, is a skill that I’ve kind of acquired as I’ve gotten older. I try and never search for it when it’s good and never search for it when it’s bad, because either way, it distracts you from focusing on what you need to focus on, just staying in the right mindset. 
    “My thing was, regardless of who they draft, I’ve got to get myself ready to go play this coming year. And I’m under contract to this organization for the next three years, and they’re going to get the absolute best out of me during that time. It doesn’t matter who they bring in, it’s not going to change that approach. So just stay in that lane, stay in that space, and try and get yourself ready to go.”
    Now, Ryan doesn’t just get the reward of adding Pitts. His approach, in keeping the chains moving through the 2021 season, also gives him a heck of a head start off where he might’ve been otherwise.

    To their credit, while Smith and Fontenot wouldn’t make Ryan promises on who they were taking fourth, the two new guys in charge weren’t shying away from building the foundation of a relationship with the former MVP. Fontenot, for example, made a point of showing up at a ribbon-cutting event for the new hospital on the team’s Flowery Branch property, because he knew he’d get quality face time with Ryan there. Smith went and got dinner with his new quarterback a few times.
    Through those summits, Ryan got to learn a bunch about the direction that the rebuild was going. Over time, he found himself increasingly bought in. And with time, he got more and more work done on his own.
    “The biggest thing was spending the last three months trying to learn the system, as much as I could,” Ryan said. “Trying to get ahead of it, so when we get to this time of year, and we’re having guys on the field and we’re able to spend time together, I could be speaking the language that coaches will want me to speak. I think that’s probably the thing that’s most different, just how much time I’ve spent on that. 
    “When you’re in the same system and you’re going through it with the same staff, you get quite a bit more of a break to recharge. That’s really how it’s been spent, getting on top of the playbook, making sure my body is in a really good space, which is what I’d be doing this time of the year anyhow. But just more time spent on learning the system.” Through that process, Ryan’s found concrete reasons for optimism.
    There’s carryover from his MVP season. Ryan’s greatest success as a pro came under ex-Atlanta offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan. The quarterbacks coach under Shanahan the two years Ryan and Shanahan were together was Matt LaFleur. LaFleur was then the offensive coordinator in Tennessee in 2018, in Mike Vrabel’s first year there, and put in the system that Smith took over there when he was promoted from tight ends coach to replace LaFleur, when LaFleur became the Packers’ head coach.
    The first place that adds up is in Smith’s evaluation of Ryan—the coach can easily see what he’s looking at in the system, because it’s a system he effectively ran the last two years.
    “One-hundred percent. One-hundred percent,” Ryan said. “He already talks in that manner of, Hey, we’re installing this, we used to teach off your cutups from back then there, but we’re going to teach off this that we used the last two years, but really it’s that same thing. And you’re like, O.K., alright, cool, perfect, we can move on to the next one, I know that one. There’s definitely some of that going on.”
    And even with all that taken into account, there’s a lot more to what Smith’s doing that’s gotten Ryan’s mind working. That’s because while the bones of his offense can be traced to the Shanahan family tree, there’s nuanced difference that made it work for Ryan Tannehill in Tennessee and will allow for Smith to fit it to Ryan, too, based on the varied experiences the coach has had. Smith worked under four head coaches in Nashville and under five coordinators before he took the reins as OC two years ago.
    “Every coordinator’s a little different, they’ve got a different flavor,” Ryan said. “To be honest with you, there’s more carryover [than just the Shanahan connection]. He worked with Mike Mularkey too in Tennessee, and Mike was my first coordinator. And Terry Robiskie was there, and Terry was our wide receivers coach for eight-plus years. There’s a mix of different parts of my career in all of it. Things I recognize from different spaces. 
    “I think everyone’s flavor on it is a little different. Matt’s very different in Green Bay than Kyle is in San Francisco now, and Sean [McVay] is different in L.A., so everybody kind of has their own flavor on it. And for sure Arthur Smith is a little different as well.”
    That dynamic, for sure, carries over into personnel too with Fontenot’s arrival. Ryan and the new GM had that meeting at the hospital opening, and have had a string of phone conversations, too. And while Ryan learned a lot, there was an obvious experience that Fontenot brought to the table that really got him going—with Fontenot’s having been part of rebuilding the Saints’ roster around an aging quarterback and, in doing so, giving Drew Brees quality swings at a championship through his thirties and into his forties. “Listen, I lived it the last five years, man,” Ryan said, laughing. “I definitely know it. They did a good job of getting that thing going pretty quickly.”
    To be sure, seeing what the Saints were bringing in those rivalry games was eye-opening for Ryan—during the phone conversations with Fontenot, Ryan jokes he got to “rehash going against him the last decade and telling him how much I hated him the day before he got hired”—with things turning as New Orleans started stacking star-studded draft classes.
    “They absolutely did a great job,” Ryan said. “And like you mentioned, building around all the things that go along with a veteran quarterback. He did an excellent job, and New Orleans did an excellent job with the last five or six years.”
    So in a lot of new ways, the last few months felt like they were giving Ryan a new lease on his football life. And drafting Pitts over Fields and Jones was simply affirmation that he was going to get a chance to live that out.  
    Ryan learned a lot by going through what he and the Falcons have over the last year. The pandemic led him, in the spring of 2020, to organize what basically mirrored an NFL offseason program. Then, there was managing COVID-19 protocols in-season, during a season that started with a five-game losing streak that got the coach he’d gone to a Super Bowl with and the GM that drafted him fired in mid-October. And a 4–2 flourish under interim coach Raheem Morris was followed by another five-game losing streak to bookend the lost season. Ryan’s now 36 and predates just about everyone in the organization, save for owner Arthur Blank and president Rich McKay. And having done what he’s done for 13 years, and taking on the role he did last year in those condition, does put him in a unique spot.
    “Going through all the COVID stuff, finding a way to be more efficient, to be better, to not waste time, to be able to maximize the time we have together, I think all of those things, I’ve learned and grown from significantly,” Ryan said. “I think you should be constantly evolving with your leadership style, because every team is different, every year’s a different group of guys and what they need from you is different. I certainly feel like I’ve changed and grown and hopefully am better served to do all these things than I’ve ever been.”
    In that way, he’s been a great resource for Smith and Fontenot, as they get their feet wet.
    But all the same, Ryan says that Smith and Fontenot have been great for him, too, in large part just because it is different. That’s not affront to anyone Ryan’s worked with, either. More so, it’s just reality—that even through what would’ve been tense moments for some people, with the possibility your replacement is about to arrive, he’s found excitement in seeing the newness of everything around him.
    Remember, the last time Ryan went through a coaching change, his career got a very real second wind, one that nearly carried him to a championship.
    “There’s a natural level of excitement that comes from it being different,” Ryan said. “And I love Dan [Quinn] and I love Thomas [Dimitroff], have so much respect for those guys, and I learned a ton from them. And I think that’s going to serve me better moving forward with a new staff. But there is excitement. It’s a little different. There’s a different energy, a level of wanting to prove yourself, show what you can do, all of that stuff is there. 
    “I think it makes it exciting, keeps it fresh for a guy in Year 14 and certainly provides plenty of motivation and gives you the energy to get out of bed and get moving.”
    Over the last few weeks, with Pitts in the fold—a tight end who Ryan says not only has the talent that’s obvious to everyone, but an attention to detail he’s seen in the best players he’s been around—and Ryan’s place in Atlanta solidified, everyone could get moving forward together with the gray area gone.
    But as for how Ryan’s approaching it? That part never changed. So he’ll just keep heading in the direction he was going all along.
  17. Like
    RedandBlack4ever reacted to Knight of God in JJ says "I'm am Outta there" on Undisputed!   
    You take a quiet, private man and put his business on blast and that's what happens. I end friendships and stop speaking with family over stuff like that.
  18. Like
    RedandBlack4ever reacted to hjerry in RUMOR REPORT *Julio & Falcons relationship is “Terrible”   
    The question here is, who is this Michael Holey (yes I can see he's apparently a host) and is anything he says here supposed to be reliable.
    It's honestly sounds like hogwash to me, made up to generate clicks from Patriots fans desperate for any kind of hope of them returning to the promised land.
  19. Haha
    RedandBlack4ever reacted to DrunkOffFalcohol in RUMOR REPORT *Julio & Falcons relationship is “Terrible”   
    I Just came this article. Haven’t seen it posted but they are really trying stir the pot. 
     
    Thoughts?
    https://t.co/TmsUtSl2W0
     
    “I’ve got some little birdies who have been talking to me. One, the reason Julio Jones is on the trade market, his relationship with the Falcons is terrible, it is bad right now… [the other reason] he [Julio] wants to play with Cam Newton… he [Julio] thinks Matt Ryanhas lost a little zing on his deep ball.”
  20. Like
    RedandBlack4ever reacted to Jesus in The Falcons could be unstoppable if Arthur Smith makes the right changes for Kyle Pitts - For The Win/USA Today   
    I'm glad the expert from the comics section, er, I mean USA Today has weighed in.
    Again everyone thinks that Smith is going to try and turn the Falcons in to Titans 2. It was the weight that hung around Quinn's neck for so many years. Look it's Seattle East. But he failed to do that. Smith is creating something bigger and better in Atlanta, just wait and see.
  21. Haha
    RedandBlack4ever reacted to TheTrue7 in The Falcons could be unstoppable if Arthur Smith makes the right changes for Kyle Pitts - For The Win/USA Today   
    Alright Goober.. I gotta know. Is there a required length or word count for posts you share? 
     
    #killingmyadhdonepostatatime
  22. Thanks
    RedandBlack4ever reacted to Goober Pyle in The Falcons could be unstoppable if Arthur Smith makes the right changes for Kyle Pitts - For The Win/USA Today   
    by Charles McDonald
     
    Julio Jones. Calvin Ridley. Kyle Pitts.
    These are the players that new Falcons head coach Arthur Smith must figure out how to deploy for the 2021 season (as long as Jones isn’t traded).
    What an immense burden to put on a first-year coach.
    Or not. This is exactly the sort of burden Smith would want to have. If the Falcons are going to maximize the last few years of Matt Ryan’s tenure with the team, Smith is going to have to immediately get this offense back on track. With the amount of offensive firepower the Falcons have, that’s certainly a manageable task.
    Jones and Ridley have pretty clear roles in this offense: Just continue to be two of the best wideouts in the game.
    Pitts’ fit with this offense isn’t as clear right now and it will force Smith to drastically adjust how he uses tight ends compared to his time as offensive coordinator with the Titans.
    Integrating a talent like Pitts into the offense shouldn’t be too difficult — he’s a special player — but it will still require a change to the offense that earned Smith his promotion to head coach.
    So it’s worth looking at the challenges ahead …
    How Arthur Smith used a star tight end in the past
     
    Newly signed Patriots tight end Jonnu Smith was the primary tight end for Arthur Smith during his tenure as the Titans offensive coordinator. Jonnu Smith was able to pick up big plays in chunks, averaging 8.1 yards per target during the two years that Arthur Smith was dialing up plays in Tennessee.
    That timespan includes a season where Jonnu Smith averaged 10 yards per target during the 2019 season. Those are impressive numbers, especially for a tight end, and it should inspire confidence that Arthur Smith can find a role for Kyle Pitts in the Falcons offense rather easily.
    However, this isn’t a swap for swap in terms of how Pitts will be used. Jonnu Smith was used more as a short area receiving threat with the ability to create chunk plays after the catch, almost like a running back.
    According to Sports Info Solutions, Jonnu Smith was 26th in intended air yards (378) and 14th in yards after the catch (243) among the 35 tight ends to record at least 40 targets last season. Among that sample, Jonnu Smith was 34th in average depth of target (5.7).
    Pitts, meanwhile, had an average depth of target of 12.8 at Florida — more than double. He did his damage in a completely different way.
    The question now is: Was Arthur Smith using Jonnu Smith that way because that’s a staple of his overall offensive scheme, or was he adjusting to the player?
    When he gets the ball in his hands, it’s easy to see why Arthur Smith dialed up easy, quick passing concepts that allowed Jonnu Smith’s athleticism to shine.
     
    Video Player   00:00   00:08 Not many tight ends have the same level of acceleration and a natural ability to carry the ball. Arthur Smith deliberately chose plays that would let Jonnu Smith make plays after the catch. The Titans game against the Bills last season had a few examples of Smith making plays after the catch.
    Video Player   00:00   00:10 Jonnu Smith is a nice weapon to have, and probably is a bit better down the field than given credit for, but he is not Kyle Pitts. And you don’t draft Kyle Pitts at No. 4 if you’re going to ask him to only do what Jonnu Smith did.
    Pitts has the talent to be the best tight end in the league and projects as a dominant vertical threat who can be used in a variety of ways.

    (Note: ISO here refers to when a TE is alone on a side of the formation, so those numbers could overlap with in-line and wide snaps.)
    The addition of Pitts is going to require Arthur Smith to expand his usage of tight ends in his offense.
    Kyle Pitts is a totally different beast
    Even though a tight end typically isn’t the best use of the fourth-overall pick, Pitts might be special enough to warrant being taken that high. Pitts was simply a force of destruction during his final season at Florida, catching 12 touchdowns on just 43 receptions.
    Pitts’ vertical ability down the field is something that Arthur Smith hasn’t had in his offense over the past couple seasons. It does appear to be something that Arthur Smith wants in his offense, however. He didn’t mind giving Jonnu Smith contested catches even though that’s not the strongest part of his game.
    Video Player   00:00   00:22 Pitts is someone that will be able to unlock that portion of the playbook. He should immediately be expected to be a positive performer in the seam and on riskier, contested catches down the field.
    Video Player   00:00   00:20 Yeah, that’ll do. It’s not just Pitts’ freakish athleticism that makes him a valuable downfield threat, he’s got great instincts as a pass catcher as well. He’ll contort his body in all types of ways to keep the ball away from defenders as he lands.
    Video Player   00:00   00:30 And he certainly has experience running some of the more deceptive play action concepts that Arthur Smith and other play action-heavy playcallers use in the NFL.
    Video Player   00:00   00:08 What makes Pitts this unicorn of a prospect is that he’s unusually good in the short area of the field, as well. Those shorter passes that Arthur Smith loved to use Jonnu Smith on? Pitts can carve defenses up on slants and screens as well.
    Not only does Pitts have rare efficiency with his movements, he’s also strong and explosive after the catch.
    Video Player   00:00   00:07 Pitts is a player that’s perfectly fine working within the constraints that were previously placed upon Jonnu Smith with the Titans.
    But that’s doing a disservice to the type of talent that Pitts is — and would put a ceiling on his potential rookie year impact. Pitts can be a player that’s still effective with an average depth of target of six yards, but he can do so much more.
    Pitts will have to fight for targets with Julio Jones and Calvin Ridley, but the caliber of player that he is will be apparent early in his NFL career. He’s even pretty solid in the run game and pass protection as a blocker. Pitts obviously is going to make his mark in this league as a pass catcher, but he did rank third in the draft class among tight ends in Sports Info Solutions’ Total Points Rating Per Block metric.
    Weirdly enough, Pitts has pretty good technique in pass protection and is willing to, at the very least, scrap it out with a defensive lineman and give himself a chance to win using his length and athleticism.
    Video Player   00:00   00:08 Pitts is pretty good at this football thing.
      What does this mean for how the Falcons offense will operate?   No disrespect to Hayden Hurst, who carved out a nice role in the Falcons’ offense after being traded from the Ravens, but he’s not Kyle Pitts. He’s all but guaranteed to see a drop in targets after setting a career-high with 88 targets in 2020.
    However, Hurst’s presence does give the Falcons a strong 12 personnel package for the time being. With Pitts ability to split out and play wide receiver from time to time, the Falcons can put defenses in a pickle by utilizing their packages with two tight ends on the field.
    Last year, the Titans were fourth in the number of dropbacks with two tight ends on the field (193), according to Sports Info Solutions. The Falcons ranked 16th (106 dropbacks), but they didn’t really have a need to get a second tight end on the field last season considering their personnel.
    Where the two tight end packages will really factor in and provide an extra boost is in the redzone. On redzone packages with two tight ends on the field, the Titans generated .377 Points Earned per play, good for seventh in the league. The Falcons ranked 17th in that category last season (.199).
    Interestingly enough, most of the Titans passes in that scenario didn’t go to tight ends. Of the 19 passes that the Titans threw in the redzone with two tight ends on the field, only seven went towards tight ends.
    Still, the Falcons can use Pitts and Hurst to open up opportunities for Jones and Ridley in the redzone. The targets that were being created for Corey Davis and A.J. Brown will now be opened up for two receivers who are better players. Expect the Falcons to be much more pass-heavy than the Titans were in 2020 (not having a Derrick Henry also plays into this).
    The addition of Pitts opens a lot of offensive possibilities for the Falcons in 2021, he just needs to be managed correctly.
    Can Pitts truly be the missing piece?
    As the draft approached, I wrote that the Falcons faced a franchise-defining decision with their pick. They could have opted to secure a QB of the future in Justin Fields. They could have traded back to grab more draft capital to be used for a rebuild.
    Or they could go all in, select Pitts and hope that Arthur Smith could use him to create a truly dynamic offense capable of challenging the Buccaneers for superiority in the NFC South.
    So how good can the Falcons actually be this year?
    If, and this is a huge if knowing how the Falcons generally grapple with luck, Pitts and Arthur Smith can get up to speed with each other in a hurry, the Falcons have a chance to get back to being an elite offense.
    What are teams supposed to do when Julio Jones is isolated on one side of the field and they still have to deal with Ridley and Pitts on the other side. Or really, any shuffling of those players in trips formations that will leave one of them isolated in single coverage.

    Pitts will need some time to adjust to the speed and the physicality of the NFL, but once he gets going he’s going to be a menace.
    The Falcons defense is likely going to hold them back from being a legitimate playoff team, but the offense should be an absolute blast to watch again. Sometimes fun is just good enough.
    The Falcons still have long-term questions — it seems unlikely they’ll be in position to truly tank and have another high first-round pick, meaning they’ll need to find Matt Ryan’s replacement later in the draft — and it may turn out that picking Pitts was ultimately the wrong move if Fields becomes a star and Pitts tops out as just a very good tight end.
    All that will be sorted in the future, though. For now, we’re just lucky that the most unique offensive prospect in the draft ended up with a coach who appears to know how to use him in creative ways.
    The Kyle Pitts era is here.
     
     
     
  23. Haha
    RedandBlack4ever reacted to Dirtier Bird in Here’s why we won’t trade Julio   
    I still think we might trade Julio. I don’t think anyone has ever accused him of digressing. He always stays on topic. 
  24. Like
    RedandBlack4ever reacted to thanat0s in Here’s why we won’t trade Julio   
    I get what you’re saying, but the fact that you don’t list touchdowns in your evidence is telling. For all his catches and yards, Julio isn’t on the same level as those other guys. He just works in a world with nonstop media saturation.
    For the record, I don’t think they’ll trade him, even though I think it’d be the wise thing to do financially if the compensation is right. I expect he has one last ride with this team, just in case they can catch some 2016 style magic. 
     
    Then, no matter what, he’s gone. 
  25. Thanks
    RedandBlack4ever reacted to gazoo in TF and AS were excited when the 49ers took Lance, turned down a call from Detroit   
    It is obvious by any objective standard that the Falcons had targeted Pitts the entire time. Of course they scouted the QBs, OTs, WRs and other players near top of draft, that's their job.........but the entire time Pitts was their guy.
    Of course they kept their phone lines open if something too good to pass up was offered in a trade.......but the entire time Pitts was their guy.
    The Ryan detractors who prophesied biblical level consequences if we passed on  the once in a lifetime opportunity of those certain HOF QBs that were there don't much care for the evidence that has surfaced since the draft, proving they were dead wrong about Falcons intentions, but it is what it is.
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