Falcons In 2012

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Everything posted by Falcons In 2012

  1. Admittedly, You don’t know a whole lot after two weeks, but an identity has started to be formed and here is what we know: • Belichick & Quinn still have it as DC’s. They are the only two HC’s also moonlighting as DC, and the results speak for themselves: ¥ Total Defense: NE is #1. ATL is #3 ¥ Yards Per Play: NE is #1. ATL is #4 • Turnovers: the Falcons have to get this under control. Teams average drive starts at the 50 yard line. You can really see the impact when looking at Opponents Yards Per Point: ¥ NE is #1 making teams go a staggering 164 yards per point allowed..LOLOL. #2 is at 35 yards per point. ¥ ATL is tied with Miami for dead last. Teams have to go just 11 yards per point allowed - Conclusion: Quinn still has it. The offense has held us back but once the turnover issue and run game get on track, watch out. Could be a special year. P.S. Patriots let their best OL and defensive player walk. The results: • Offense: 38 ppg - Defense: 1.5 ppg
  2. Let’s bring it full circle with a pick 6 heading into halftime
  3. Maybe they are not as talented as we think. Unfortunately, we’ve already paid them all
  4. Can we please put Julio in the slot and start attacking between the numbers. Ryan lacks the arm to consistently attack outside the numbers
  5. Has Ridley even seen a ball yet? Or is he going to say the film showed he wasn’t open again?
  6. Meanwhile, in Detroit, Bevell and the undefeated Lions are up 7 on KC
  7. Yep. You can tell because those two are outliers when you look at personal groupings. They use twice as much 13 & 21 personell as anyone else. Their positionless offense is how they scored 28 points in the 2nd half against us. Their RB’s out of the slot or out wide had no counter by Quinn. I forget how many catches white had in the Super Bowl, but he should’ve been the MVP
  8. If any of those 3 teams wins a title this year and another wins one next year, I’ll be thrilled
  9. Great post. I love this quote from Peyton Manning: Former assistant Jeff Davidson has remarked that Belichick could coach every spot on the field as well as any position coach. Former rival quarterback Peyton Manning, who has become friendly with Belichick from rounds in charity golf tournaments, says he dismantles player weaknesses like tinker toys. Manning has tried to quiz him about various great players he has faced. “What I came away with is that he’s not that impressed with anybody,” Manning says. “I remember telling my dad once, ‘I hope nobody ever asks Bill about me because I don’t want to hear what he says.’ ”
  10. Bill’s time in Cleveland was tragically unappreciated. Over a 3 year period between 92-94, their defense allowed just 16 ppg. If they had learned to play the pattern Match Cover 3 in ‘94 they likely would have beaten Pittsburgh and gotten to a SB. Remove the Steelers games and they allowed just 10 ppg on the season.
  11. That’s what’s up, Ebron. He is now one of my favorite non-Falcons players.
  12. I suspect by season’s end we may force Rex to eat his words. Bit as for now, he isn’t wrong and thanks for the bulletin board material...
  13. Great post. I think Belichick is the best teacher in NFL history. He knows how to break down complex things and can teach the message simply and effectively.
  14. Bills are 3-0. We will see how legit tomorrow. But a string of games playing the Browns, Ravens, Eagles, Cowboys, Texans & Chiefs is a tough 6 game stretch
  15. One could also say Bill Belichick, the one we know today, owes much of his HC legacy to Tom Brady. With Drew Bledsoe, a B+ QB, the Patriots won just 5 games in their first 19 weeks under Belichick. 0-2 in Year 2, they only scored over 24 points twice in two years. Week 3, Tom Brady enters the stage. En route to finishing 14-3 and defeating the Greatest Show in Turf, Brady leads the offense over 24 points 7 times. 19 Games With Bledsoe in 2000/2001: 16 ppg Remaining 14 Games With Brady En Route To SB: 25.5 ppg
  16. My favorite Steve Belichick quote from his scouting masterpiece: “Get as much usable information as can be utilized to either (1) help formulate game plans, or (2) better prepare various individual players to either combat the strength, or take advantage of the weaknesses of an individual or opposing team. It appears that if any information obtained does not fall into one of those two categories, then it is useless.” — Steve Belichick, “Football Scouting Methods”
  17. We have discussed how average their defenses have been compared to public perception. They’ve been a BBDB defense for years. Is it just a coincidence that once BB takes over the defense again they dominate like early 2000’s Patriots, 1994 Browns and 91 Giants?
  18. There can’t really even be a question about it
  19. He is the DC this year too
  20. The idea is havi g interchangeable parts at RB/WR & even TE so you can call any play in the play bloom without switching out personnel which often tips your hand on a playcall. The idea is to keep the defense honest. If you force a defense to play honest the advantage goes to the offense every single time. That’s why Kyle puts his QB under center and runs and passes equally out of heavy sets and smaller sets. They run more 13 & 21 personnel than anyone else by a long shot. That’s all designed to keep the possibility of a run open on every play NFL average for 21 personnel is 8%. 49ers are at 42% ”One example that comes to mind is in 11 personnel. The 49ers will be able to deploy an 11 personnel package where Jalen Hurd is one of the three receivers, but he lines up as a tight end and gives it more of a 12 look (one running back, two tight ends) with two receivers. The next play could feature the same group with Hurd lining up as a running back and the running back splitting out wide to give a more traditional 11 look with a wide receiver in the backfield. They could even empty the backfield and essentially turn that package into a five wide receiver set. It’s a fascinating concept that could turn the 49ers’ offense into a tornado of varying personnel packages that tears up every offensive norm or tendency defensive coaches rely on.“
  21. Kyle Shanahan on the cutting edge with 'positionless' offense By Kyle Madson | June 1, 2019 3:08 pm ET Share on FacebookTweetShare on WhatsappShare by Email The 49ers offense could have a much different look in 2019, and it’s not just because they’re getting injured players back. It appears head coach Kyle Shanahan is constructing an offense that pushes the typical boundaries of the way teams think about that side of the ball. 49ers running back Tevin Coleman, who spent his first two NFL seasons in Atlanta where Shanahan was the offensive coordinator, told reporters that he’s noticed a difference in the coach’s scheme since he last played in the offense in 2016 with the Atlanta Falcons. “He’s definitely more creative than he was in Atlanta, everything he’s doing with the backs, tight ends and receivers,” Coleman said according to Cam Inman of the Mercury News. RELATED Candlestick Chronicles: Changes come for 49ers in OTAs The running back went on to say he’s lining up more as a receiver than he ever did during Shanahan’s tenure with the Falcons. That’s an interesting note when considering the type of players the 49ers have been stockpiling over the last two seasons. Let’s consider the 2018 49ers for a moment. The fully healthy version of that offense featured versatile running backs Jerick McKinnon and Matt Breida. In the backfield with them was Swiss army knife fullback Kyle Juszczyk who can line up anywhere on the field. It also had an extremely athletic tight end, George Kittle. Those four alone all had the ability to stretch their on-field responsibilities outside of those typical for their positions. The receiving corps lacked in that area, and Shanahan made it a point this offseason to change that. He even told reporters at the owners meetings that versatility from his receivers would be something he wanted to fix over the offseason. He wanted more pass catchers who could line up in different areas and take on different responsibilities in the offense. RELATED 49ers rookie punter Mitch Wishnowsky impressing early That trend toward more interchangeable pieces started in free agency when the team added Coleman to their already crowded backfield. Then they signed wide receiver Jordan Matthews to a one-year deal. Matthews can play any of the receiver spots in the 49ers offense. Shanahan’s mission of offensive versatility continued in the draft when they used their second- and third-round picks on wide receivers Deebo Samuel and Jalen Hurd. Samuel is capable of the same versatility as Matthews, while Samuel is a converted running back who played a do-everything role during his final year at Baylor. Prioritizing a receiver in the second round wasn’t a huge surprise, but the Hurd selection in the third is a massive indicator of what San Francisco’s head coach has planned for his offensive attack. RELATED Pro Football Focus: 49ers have NFL's most improved defensive line “Positionless” is the phrase du jour for describing what the 49ers are building on offense. They’re stocking up on players who allow them to vary their play calls and formations without ever changing the personnel. That layer of unpredictability is potentially deadly in a league where opposing coaches feast on tendencies. Shanahan was already on the forefront of this concept last season. San Francisco ran 11 personnel (one running back, one tight end) with three receivers only 39 percent of the time last season, according to Sharp Football Stats. The next-lowest in the league was New Orleans at 53 percent. The NFL as a whole used 11 personnel a whopping 66 percent of the time, and passed out of that formation at the same rate. San Francisco passed out of 11 personnel 83 percent of the time. It’s the most predictable of the common personnel groupings, and the 49ers utilized it far less than the rest of the league. RELATED 49ers cut ties with former 1st-round pick Anthony Davis Where Shanahan varies greatly from the rest of the league is in the use of 21 personnel (two running backs, one tight end) with two receivers. NFL teams on average use 21 personnel just 8 percent of the time. San Francisco utilized 42 percent of their offensive snaps in 2018. By comparison, New England runs it 28 percent of the time; no other team eclipsed 15 percent, and the Rams didn’t use it once. While the league had a 40-60 pass-to-run ratio out of 21 personnel, the 49ers were at 46-54. Keeping defenses off balance through personnel groupings will be a hallmark of the 2019 iteration of the 49ers offense. One example that comes to mind is in 11 personnel. The 49ers will be able to deploy an 11 personnel package where Jalen Hurd is one of the three receivers, but he lines up as a tight end and gives it more of a 12 look (one running back, two tight ends) with two receivers. RELATED 49ers roster battle: Who backs up TE George Kittle? The next play could feature the same group with Hurd lining up as a running back and the running back splitting out wide to give a more traditional 11 look with a wide receiver in the backfield. They could even empty the backfield and essentially turn that package into a five wide receiver set. It’s a fascinating concept that could turn the 49ers’ offense into a tornado of varying personnel packages that tears up every offensive norm or tendency defensive coaches rely on. A few obstacles stand in the way of this offensive revolution. Health is an obvious one, with quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo and McKinnon both missing most of all of last season with torn ACLs. Several members of the receiving corps dealt with injuries last season too, including Dante Pettis, who’s expected to be a key part of the passing attack. Any limitations from a roster standpoint could handcuff the coaching staff in terms of utilizing the various skill sets of their offensive weapons. RELATED Tarvarius Moore gets snaps at natural free safety position Another big one is the development of rookies Samuel and Hurd. Their quick learning would be immensely helpful for San Francisco as they try and expand the playbook for players at different spots. It’d be a significant blow to the advancement of Shanahan’s offense if Samuel can only handle one receiver job, or Hurd doesn’t catch on quick enough to play a couple of different positions. Shanahan’s innovative thinking on offense helped spawn head coaches like the Rams’ Sean McVay and the Packers’ Matt LaFleur. It doesn’t look like the coach is settling with a very good scheme. The 49ers are continuing to adapt to the ever-changing NFL, and if things go right, San Francisco will be several steps ahead of everyone else.
  22. My man
  23. Agreed. And the yardage for Ryan is irrelevant. At least for me. If we average 100 ypg on the ground, we will make the playoffs and Ryan will be a top-7 QB.
  24. I agree. And it should balance out by Week 12 I am just saying these are the things Ryan did best. Not that he liked the best, cause he didn’t. Ryan openly admits he does not like turning his back on the defense. But Shanahan made him do it anyways, Neither Sark not Dirk take such a heavy handed approach with Ryan..but maybe that style coaching gets the best version of Matt Ryan? We will know more in 2 months. Hoping like crazy for the best Regardless, solid discussion Vel. Always like your insight
  25. The Vikings are allowing 105 ypg on the ground Who would run against the Eagles when they allow 325 yards passing per game