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Return of the Gaucho

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  1. Like
    Return of the Gaucho reacted to MAD597 in How can Quinn NOT be fired by Tomorrow?   
    They were up 26-10 in the 4th QTR, The defense blew it again and Quinn is SUPPOSED to be a Defensive Genius
  2. Like
    Return of the Gaucho reacted to 1989Fan in Just finish watching 2nd half of the season after giving up 1-4   
    So from watching the strong end to our season you are concerned? How about detailing what you observed to get that feeling? The homer in me feels we played pretty well down the stretch, especially on defense and if that’s the ‘real’ Falcons we should be pretty enthusiastic about this season.
  3. Like
    Return of the Gaucho reacted to athell in Rams pushed hard to get the Falcons to trade for Gurley   
    Take the L and move on.
  4. Like
    Return of the Gaucho reacted to 1989Fan in Takk?   
    Well at least the team learned from its 5th year option misses. Takks decline has been a combination of the past two with not playing good enough (Vic) and not staying healthy (Neal)...completely justifiable. He can be upset, but he hasn’t owned it once. Instead blames everyone else, tweets about wanting to go to other teams etc.
    the deals are more expensive and fully guaranteed now, so it will much riskier to 5th year option the back half of the draft. That may not have impacted Takk though based on when it went into effect w new CBA.
  5. Like
    Return of the Gaucho reacted to 1989Fan in Takk?   
    He is still Immature, that’s all. It’s one thing to be motivated, but another to blame others. (Falcons, Adidas)
    Takk doesn’t want to own that he wasn’t good enough nor healthy enough for a big fully guaranteed pay day (5th year). Not sure why he is trying to throw shade on the team, they did the right thing. At this point I would wonder if he is butt hurt enough that he won’t sign here even if they tried.
  6. Like
    Return of the Gaucho reacted to spanish_falcon in Takk?   
    Even adidas do not believe in him, so why is he so salty? Dude hasn't lived up to his 1st round status at all. He wants the team to pick up his option when he hasn't done anything to justify it? Childish.
    Can't wait to see him gone for good.
  7. Haha
  8. Like
    Return of the Gaucho reacted to falcons007 in Raheem Morris Edition: Stats, Lies, smoke and mirror myths   
    Which is exactly the point of the post, 12 of those turnovers from game 1-8 happened when trailing for eternity. The remaining turnovers were the Eagles game, Matt has one of those weird 3-5 pick outlier games you win anyway. When Morris took over, the Offense didn't have to play half the snaps trailing by couple of scores, because Defense was doing decent job. One unit playing at historic dumpster levels unbalances the team. 
  9. Thanks
    Return of the Gaucho got a reaction from Francis York Morgan in The Dan Quinn is Mad as **** Thread   
    So, now can we compromise? 
     
    https://www.reddit.com/r/pics/comments/gxe451/armed_black_panthers_join_protest_in_georgia/?utm_source=share&utm_medium=ios_app&utm_name=iossmf
     
    https://decaturish.com/2020/06/presence-of-new-black-panther-party-members-at-decatur-protest-raises-questions-and-concerns/
     
    Irrespective of the SPLC designations of the New Black Panthers, what happens when protestors peacefully exercise their second amendment rights in an open carry state? Which hypocritical side of the two party system breaks first? 🤔
    I guess I’m just glad Reagan isn’t governor of Georgia right now. 
  10. Like
    Return of the Gaucho got a reaction from The Branch in The Dan Quinn is Mad as **** Thread   
    So without quoting every post, I do want to thank everyone who replied, though I have no idea how to link their handles in the reply. I went back and read a bit more, and I see no need to continue to debate the police vs. protesters issue that has been so thoroughly discussed. I would note that my issue lies with the, what I view as, correct distinguishing of the protesters from the looters, with the seemingly monolithic treatment of police in general. There is a certain appeal to the argument that police officers who are good, nevertheless fail their public when they are silent or allow bad cops to engage in exactly the behavior that has triggered these protests. Yet I see a clear tendency to paint the police as a bloc, and the protesters/looters as a dichotomy. 
    That behavior of the police forces in the US by and large needs to change, but it isn't as simple as "more oversight" or "remove the power of the police unions." Oakland is the perfect example of what can go wrong with having a goal of reform without a plan. A federal lawsuit was brought against Oakland for civil rights violations due to the actions of several members of the OPD. The settlement of the lawsuit brought about major changes, federal oversight and an independent police commission to hold the police accountable. This has gone on nearly 20 years, and there have been a lot of changes in the OPD for the better, but the oversight remains. In 2016, a sexual assault case within OPD resulted in firings, and the resignation of the police chief, and the subsequent appointment of a popular and reform minded police chief named Anne Kirkpatrick. She was subsequently terminated by the oversight commission "without cause" for what she claims was the refusal to reimburse one of the commissioner's car towing fees. In the background of all of this, the police department is chronically underfunded and doesn't have the resources to adequately police the city in the best of times, let alone now. Every use of force, which in my understanding can be as simple as handcuffing, requires the officers involved and witnessing the use of force to file a report. This takes officers off the street daily to write these reports. It's all in the goal of accountability and reform, but it only exacerbates the problems.
    While the specifics are surely different in departments across the country, the underlying issues are not unique. When you add onto that the looting and rioting that has occurred over the past week, you take police officers who are already overstretched and force them to work significant overtime dealing with situations that they are quite frankly not trained for. The overzealous use of pepper spray, "non-lethal" rounds, and other tactics by the police is overwhelmingly unwarranted, but realistically what do you expect when a police officer is pushed to exhaustion and confronted with a mob?  It doesn't excuse it, but I think it needs to be considered when judging these situations. The actions over the past week are not really reflective of the underlying issues of disproportionate targeting and treatment of minorities and the poor, and a lack of accountability for officers who either never should have been sworn in in the first place or those who weren't trained in how to handle things properly. 
    So what is to be done? If someone says increase the police budget for training, more manpower for community policing, more oversight, etc., it seems to be a non-starter. Holding police accountable is certainly a goal I agree with, but how is it done without giving the police departments the resources to make the changes needed to prevent the abuses in the first place? Do you strip qualified immunity? Do you force police officers to carry their own professional liability insurance? I really don't have the answer, but I tend believe that more accountability needs to be forced on the police and adequate resources to meet those heightened standards should be part and parcel with the accountability.
    I'll end the wall of text there, but this issue is something I have followed closely since I began working as a public defender 10 years ago, and continues to be something I find myself dwelling on now that I have been in the civil arena for 5 or so years.  As always, I do appreciate the thought that the posters in ABF tend to put in, despite my lack of participation. 
  11. Like
    Return of the Gaucho got a reaction from Francis York Morgan in The Dan Quinn is Mad as **** Thread   
    So without quoting every post, I do want to thank everyone who replied, though I have no idea how to link their handles in the reply. I went back and read a bit more, and I see no need to continue to debate the police vs. protesters issue that has been so thoroughly discussed. I would note that my issue lies with the, what I view as, correct distinguishing of the protesters from the looters, with the seemingly monolithic treatment of police in general. There is a certain appeal to the argument that police officers who are good, nevertheless fail their public when they are silent or allow bad cops to engage in exactly the behavior that has triggered these protests. Yet I see a clear tendency to paint the police as a bloc, and the protesters/looters as a dichotomy. 
    That behavior of the police forces in the US by and large needs to change, but it isn't as simple as "more oversight" or "remove the power of the police unions." Oakland is the perfect example of what can go wrong with having a goal of reform without a plan. A federal lawsuit was brought against Oakland for civil rights violations due to the actions of several members of the OPD. The settlement of the lawsuit brought about major changes, federal oversight and an independent police commission to hold the police accountable. This has gone on nearly 20 years, and there have been a lot of changes in the OPD for the better, but the oversight remains. In 2016, a sexual assault case within OPD resulted in firings, and the resignation of the police chief, and the subsequent appointment of a popular and reform minded police chief named Anne Kirkpatrick. She was subsequently terminated by the oversight commission "without cause" for what she claims was the refusal to reimburse one of the commissioner's car towing fees. In the background of all of this, the police department is chronically underfunded and doesn't have the resources to adequately police the city in the best of times, let alone now. Every use of force, which in my understanding can be as simple as handcuffing, requires the officers involved and witnessing the use of force to file a report. This takes officers off the street daily to write these reports. It's all in the goal of accountability and reform, but it only exacerbates the problems.
    While the specifics are surely different in departments across the country, the underlying issues are not unique. When you add onto that the looting and rioting that has occurred over the past week, you take police officers who are already overstretched and force them to work significant overtime dealing with situations that they are quite frankly not trained for. The overzealous use of pepper spray, "non-lethal" rounds, and other tactics by the police is overwhelmingly unwarranted, but realistically what do you expect when a police officer is pushed to exhaustion and confronted with a mob?  It doesn't excuse it, but I think it needs to be considered when judging these situations. The actions over the past week are not really reflective of the underlying issues of disproportionate targeting and treatment of minorities and the poor, and a lack of accountability for officers who either never should have been sworn in in the first place or those who weren't trained in how to handle things properly. 
    So what is to be done? If someone says increase the police budget for training, more manpower for community policing, more oversight, etc., it seems to be a non-starter. Holding police accountable is certainly a goal I agree with, but how is it done without giving the police departments the resources to make the changes needed to prevent the abuses in the first place? Do you strip qualified immunity? Do you force police officers to carry their own professional liability insurance? I really don't have the answer, but I tend believe that more accountability needs to be forced on the police and adequate resources to meet those heightened standards should be part and parcel with the accountability.
    I'll end the wall of text there, but this issue is something I have followed closely since I began working as a public defender 10 years ago, and continues to be something I find myself dwelling on now that I have been in the civil arena for 5 or so years.  As always, I do appreciate the thought that the posters in ABF tend to put in, despite my lack of participation. 
  12. Haha
    Return of the Gaucho got a reaction from Leon Troutsky in The Dan Quinn is Mad as **** Thread   
    I would need 4 paragraphs and 3 footnotes to explain my position, so I will refrain. 
  13. Like
    Return of the Gaucho got a reaction from falconsd56 in The Dan Quinn is Mad as **** Thread   
    So without quoting every post, I do want to thank everyone who replied, though I have no idea how to link their handles in the reply. I went back and read a bit more, and I see no need to continue to debate the police vs. protesters issue that has been so thoroughly discussed. I would note that my issue lies with the, what I view as, correct distinguishing of the protesters from the looters, with the seemingly monolithic treatment of police in general. There is a certain appeal to the argument that police officers who are good, nevertheless fail their public when they are silent or allow bad cops to engage in exactly the behavior that has triggered these protests. Yet I see a clear tendency to paint the police as a bloc, and the protesters/looters as a dichotomy. 
    That behavior of the police forces in the US by and large needs to change, but it isn't as simple as "more oversight" or "remove the power of the police unions." Oakland is the perfect example of what can go wrong with having a goal of reform without a plan. A federal lawsuit was brought against Oakland for civil rights violations due to the actions of several members of the OPD. The settlement of the lawsuit brought about major changes, federal oversight and an independent police commission to hold the police accountable. This has gone on nearly 20 years, and there have been a lot of changes in the OPD for the better, but the oversight remains. In 2016, a sexual assault case within OPD resulted in firings, and the resignation of the police chief, and the subsequent appointment of a popular and reform minded police chief named Anne Kirkpatrick. She was subsequently terminated by the oversight commission "without cause" for what she claims was the refusal to reimburse one of the commissioner's car towing fees. In the background of all of this, the police department is chronically underfunded and doesn't have the resources to adequately police the city in the best of times, let alone now. Every use of force, which in my understanding can be as simple as handcuffing, requires the officers involved and witnessing the use of force to file a report. This takes officers off the street daily to write these reports. It's all in the goal of accountability and reform, but it only exacerbates the problems.
    While the specifics are surely different in departments across the country, the underlying issues are not unique. When you add onto that the looting and rioting that has occurred over the past week, you take police officers who are already overstretched and force them to work significant overtime dealing with situations that they are quite frankly not trained for. The overzealous use of pepper spray, "non-lethal" rounds, and other tactics by the police is overwhelmingly unwarranted, but realistically what do you expect when a police officer is pushed to exhaustion and confronted with a mob?  It doesn't excuse it, but I think it needs to be considered when judging these situations. The actions over the past week are not really reflective of the underlying issues of disproportionate targeting and treatment of minorities and the poor, and a lack of accountability for officers who either never should have been sworn in in the first place or those who weren't trained in how to handle things properly. 
    So what is to be done? If someone says increase the police budget for training, more manpower for community policing, more oversight, etc., it seems to be a non-starter. Holding police accountable is certainly a goal I agree with, but how is it done without giving the police departments the resources to make the changes needed to prevent the abuses in the first place? Do you strip qualified immunity? Do you force police officers to carry their own professional liability insurance? I really don't have the answer, but I tend believe that more accountability needs to be forced on the police and adequate resources to meet those heightened standards should be part and parcel with the accountability.
    I'll end the wall of text there, but this issue is something I have followed closely since I began working as a public defender 10 years ago, and continues to be something I find myself dwelling on now that I have been in the civil arena for 5 or so years.  As always, I do appreciate the thought that the posters in ABF tend to put in, despite my lack of participation. 
  14. Haha
    Return of the Gaucho got a reaction from Mr. Hoopah! in The Dan Quinn is Mad as **** Thread   
    I think verbose or garrulous would be more apt. 
  15. Like
    Return of the Gaucho reacted to Jdrizzle in The Dan Quinn is Mad as **** Thread   
    I mean......he's a lawyer. If there is anything we know about lawyers its that they're whatever the **** you just said.
  16. Like
    Return of the Gaucho reacted to Leon Troutsky in The Dan Quinn is Mad as **** Thread   
    And you people accuse me of being loquacious!  
  17. Like
    Return of the Gaucho got a reaction from Mr. Hoopah! in The Dan Quinn is Mad as **** Thread   
    So without quoting every post, I do want to thank everyone who replied, though I have no idea how to link their handles in the reply. I went back and read a bit more, and I see no need to continue to debate the police vs. protesters issue that has been so thoroughly discussed. I would note that my issue lies with the, what I view as, correct distinguishing of the protesters from the looters, with the seemingly monolithic treatment of police in general. There is a certain appeal to the argument that police officers who are good, nevertheless fail their public when they are silent or allow bad cops to engage in exactly the behavior that has triggered these protests. Yet I see a clear tendency to paint the police as a bloc, and the protesters/looters as a dichotomy. 
    That behavior of the police forces in the US by and large needs to change, but it isn't as simple as "more oversight" or "remove the power of the police unions." Oakland is the perfect example of what can go wrong with having a goal of reform without a plan. A federal lawsuit was brought against Oakland for civil rights violations due to the actions of several members of the OPD. The settlement of the lawsuit brought about major changes, federal oversight and an independent police commission to hold the police accountable. This has gone on nearly 20 years, and there have been a lot of changes in the OPD for the better, but the oversight remains. In 2016, a sexual assault case within OPD resulted in firings, and the resignation of the police chief, and the subsequent appointment of a popular and reform minded police chief named Anne Kirkpatrick. She was subsequently terminated by the oversight commission "without cause" for what she claims was the refusal to reimburse one of the commissioner's car towing fees. In the background of all of this, the police department is chronically underfunded and doesn't have the resources to adequately police the city in the best of times, let alone now. Every use of force, which in my understanding can be as simple as handcuffing, requires the officers involved and witnessing the use of force to file a report. This takes officers off the street daily to write these reports. It's all in the goal of accountability and reform, but it only exacerbates the problems.
    While the specifics are surely different in departments across the country, the underlying issues are not unique. When you add onto that the looting and rioting that has occurred over the past week, you take police officers who are already overstretched and force them to work significant overtime dealing with situations that they are quite frankly not trained for. The overzealous use of pepper spray, "non-lethal" rounds, and other tactics by the police is overwhelmingly unwarranted, but realistically what do you expect when a police officer is pushed to exhaustion and confronted with a mob?  It doesn't excuse it, but I think it needs to be considered when judging these situations. The actions over the past week are not really reflective of the underlying issues of disproportionate targeting and treatment of minorities and the poor, and a lack of accountability for officers who either never should have been sworn in in the first place or those who weren't trained in how to handle things properly. 
    So what is to be done? If someone says increase the police budget for training, more manpower for community policing, more oversight, etc., it seems to be a non-starter. Holding police accountable is certainly a goal I agree with, but how is it done without giving the police departments the resources to make the changes needed to prevent the abuses in the first place? Do you strip qualified immunity? Do you force police officers to carry their own professional liability insurance? I really don't have the answer, but I tend believe that more accountability needs to be forced on the police and adequate resources to meet those heightened standards should be part and parcel with the accountability.
    I'll end the wall of text there, but this issue is something I have followed closely since I began working as a public defender 10 years ago, and continues to be something I find myself dwelling on now that I have been in the civil arena for 5 or so years.  As always, I do appreciate the thought that the posters in ABF tend to put in, despite my lack of participation. 
  18. Like
    Return of the Gaucho got a reaction from Jdrizzle in The Dan Quinn is Mad as **** Thread   
    So without quoting every post, I do want to thank everyone who replied, though I have no idea how to link their handles in the reply. I went back and read a bit more, and I see no need to continue to debate the police vs. protesters issue that has been so thoroughly discussed. I would note that my issue lies with the, what I view as, correct distinguishing of the protesters from the looters, with the seemingly monolithic treatment of police in general. There is a certain appeal to the argument that police officers who are good, nevertheless fail their public when they are silent or allow bad cops to engage in exactly the behavior that has triggered these protests. Yet I see a clear tendency to paint the police as a bloc, and the protesters/looters as a dichotomy. 
    That behavior of the police forces in the US by and large needs to change, but it isn't as simple as "more oversight" or "remove the power of the police unions." Oakland is the perfect example of what can go wrong with having a goal of reform without a plan. A federal lawsuit was brought against Oakland for civil rights violations due to the actions of several members of the OPD. The settlement of the lawsuit brought about major changes, federal oversight and an independent police commission to hold the police accountable. This has gone on nearly 20 years, and there have been a lot of changes in the OPD for the better, but the oversight remains. In 2016, a sexual assault case within OPD resulted in firings, and the resignation of the police chief, and the subsequent appointment of a popular and reform minded police chief named Anne Kirkpatrick. She was subsequently terminated by the oversight commission "without cause" for what she claims was the refusal to reimburse one of the commissioner's car towing fees. In the background of all of this, the police department is chronically underfunded and doesn't have the resources to adequately police the city in the best of times, let alone now. Every use of force, which in my understanding can be as simple as handcuffing, requires the officers involved and witnessing the use of force to file a report. This takes officers off the street daily to write these reports. It's all in the goal of accountability and reform, but it only exacerbates the problems.
    While the specifics are surely different in departments across the country, the underlying issues are not unique. When you add onto that the looting and rioting that has occurred over the past week, you take police officers who are already overstretched and force them to work significant overtime dealing with situations that they are quite frankly not trained for. The overzealous use of pepper spray, "non-lethal" rounds, and other tactics by the police is overwhelmingly unwarranted, but realistically what do you expect when a police officer is pushed to exhaustion and confronted with a mob?  It doesn't excuse it, but I think it needs to be considered when judging these situations. The actions over the past week are not really reflective of the underlying issues of disproportionate targeting and treatment of minorities and the poor, and a lack of accountability for officers who either never should have been sworn in in the first place or those who weren't trained in how to handle things properly. 
    So what is to be done? If someone says increase the police budget for training, more manpower for community policing, more oversight, etc., it seems to be a non-starter. Holding police accountable is certainly a goal I agree with, but how is it done without giving the police departments the resources to make the changes needed to prevent the abuses in the first place? Do you strip qualified immunity? Do you force police officers to carry their own professional liability insurance? I really don't have the answer, but I tend believe that more accountability needs to be forced on the police and adequate resources to meet those heightened standards should be part and parcel with the accountability.
    I'll end the wall of text there, but this issue is something I have followed closely since I began working as a public defender 10 years ago, and continues to be something I find myself dwelling on now that I have been in the civil arena for 5 or so years.  As always, I do appreciate the thought that the posters in ABF tend to put in, despite my lack of participation. 
  19. Like
    Return of the Gaucho reacted to ROMERO in Not a Falcon, but ****, OUR UNIFORMS ARE FIRE!!   
    I dont care what others think. I love our new uniforms. Going to look even better in action.
  20. Haha
    Return of the Gaucho reacted to Mister pudding in Was Colin Cowherd right about Matt?   
    Cowturd makes 6 million a year, but I can't find a good year for him to throw out
  21. Like
    Return of the Gaucho reacted to Rings in Was Colin Cowherd right about Matt?   
    Same Logic
    Matt Ryan (Remove 09 & 16)
    Yards: 4,236
    Yards per Game: 272
    TDs: 26
    INTs: 13
    Completion: 65.4%
    QBR: 67.6
    Aaron Rodgers (Remove 11 & 15)
    Yards: 3,815
    Yards per Game: 266
    TDs: 29
    INTs: 7
    Completion: 64.8%
    QBR: 65.7
    Ryan has only missed 3 games over that span, Rodgers 17, which is why I included yards per game.  

    Point is, the perception a strong arm (very over rated) and a ring (team accomplishment) makes on the media and  fans is insane.  You could make the argument Rodgers is the more physically talented QB but Ryan has actually played just as well, if not better, over their career, but especially the last five years.
  22. Like
    Return of the Gaucho reacted to #55 in Was Colin Cowherd right about Matt?   
    There's a whole legion of flatearthers too
  23. Like
    Return of the Gaucho got a reaction from HouseofEuphoria in Falcons-Broncos Game Back in the ATL   
    This is certainly better for the fans in Atlanta as they aren't robbed of a homegame, but I am bummed. We were going to go over for the game and visit family in Ireland for a week after. Oh well, that probably wasn't going to happen with the Covid stuff anyway.
  24. Like
    Return of the Gaucho reacted to Dem Birds in 2021 CAP Update   
    You probably hated the ones you now consider downgraded anyway so... 
  25. Like
    Return of the Gaucho reacted to Dem Birds in 2021 CAP Update   
    So we upgraded 2 positions, maybe 3 in free agency when everyone said we had no money to do anything and we are still complaining about the cap? Lol
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