chronob

Forum Members
  • Content count

    100
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About chronob

  • Rank
    Rookie

Contact Methods

  • ICQ
    0

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male

Recent Profile Visitors

824 profile views
  1. I've noticed this before. I don't know if it is a consequence of the design that it stains or retains dirt, or if they simply are holding off on cleaning the roof areas until they don't have to have people working up there all the time. But it looks dirty in most of the roof shots and footage that I've seen. I'd be very curious to see how they do/will clean it.
  2. One other thing to consider. This may be a business decision, but it may not be a football business decision. Julio may need more money, period. Falcons star receiver Julio Jones is calling an audible on a planned 16-acre, $180 million mixed-use development that he’s involved with next to Gwinnett County’s Mall of Georgia. The project known as “Ariston” would rise at Mall of Georgia and Woodward Crossing boulevards. Originally, it was going to feature a 21-story hotel, hundreds of apartments, retail, office space and a grocery store. The blueprint for the project will be altered significantly, according to a letter from the project’s attorneys to Gwinnett County. For example, two years ago the site was rezoned for 541 apartments. That number would now be reduced to no more than 285, according to new plans. The 21-story hotel would now be just four stories. The former density is reduced, too. The original site plan provided for more than 2,000 parking spaces in decks spread across the development. However, the project will now feature traditional surface parking. The “letter of intent for a change conditions” was submitted on behalf of Ariston Group LLC. The project would still “maintain the original sense of place and energetic, urban environment of the original mixed-use proposal” and provide “pedestrian connectivity” to amenities such as the mall and Ivy Creek Greenway, according to the letter. In 2015, Jones, the former University of Alabama standout and one of the top receivers in the NFL, became a financial partner in the project. Ivy Creek Partners LLC has been providing real estate services for the development. https://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/news/2018/06/01/real-estate-notes-julio-jones-mall-of-georgia-mi.html
  3. I honestly think holding out of training camp is a bad idea for Julio. I understand that the market has changed, and based on that I think he does deserve more money. He's one of the best, and you have to pay the best like the best. But he should know that he can't spring something like this on them. They have to plan their spending years in advance to manage other players contracts, the cap, etc. It's not as if he isn't getting paid quite a lot anyway, and it's not as if he can't trust the Falcons to make things right just like they've said they will. They have a proven track record of taking care of their valuable players, including the top contract they've already given him. It just so happens that the market went up rapidly afterwards. All a holdout does it make life harder on his teammates and himself, and make him look bad in the public eye. Instead, I think the better strategy would have been to publicly announce that he wants a new contract, and then bet on himself. Imagine if he were to show up, ball out, and have one of best seasons while everyone knows he deserves a better contract. He'd completely be in the driver's seat when negotiating. Now, he's giving up valuable practice time to Calvin Ridley, and making it more difficult for the offense to improve after a season where both the offense and Julio himself underperformed (touchdowns, anyone?). If he holds out and the offense doesn't improve this season that only weakens his position, in my opinion. One has to wonder where this will go. If Ridley looks like the real deal, and Julio continues to underperform in the redzone (or the Falcons' season stinks), it's not crazy to think his time with the Falcons could be nearing an end. Dimitroff wouldn't be doing his job if he wasn't thinking about all the ways this could play out, and what is ultimately best for the team. Perhaps this is a more calculated move on Julio's part than it seems. Either he get's a new, max contract now (or later), or he gets traded to a contender during the season if things aren't going well. Either way, I worry we could be seeing the tail end of Julio's time with the Falcons, and that would be a darn shame.
  4. It's a credit to Quinn and the culture he's fostered that they could even think about the whole team working in tandem on such a divisive issue. For me personally, if they decide to continue to protest I will happily spend my family's dollars on the Braves.
  5. I think we can all agree with that. There's no reason we can't have both. It was obvious that Shanahan was an arrogant coach, and he wasn't buddy-buddy with his players. Quite frankly, the comments made by players about how happy they were to work with Sark makes me think they considered Kyle an arsehole. But you know what? Sometimes you need that, and the tension that comes from it. Kyle's first season it hurt them, but after everyone learned to work together the second season we had an all-time offense. Even the best players need coaches that give them grief sometimes. It can't be all sunshine and rainbows.
  6. What the heck is this forum for if not for people to post about things that excite them or disappoint them about the team? I love how people that are tired of threads criticizing Sark take the time to post in the darn thread. More power to you, R. The more thoughtful posts criticizing Sark the better, and I hope he reads them. He doesn't have to be compared to Shanahan to see he was a lousy play caller last season. And that's only part of the problem. He (and Quinn) were the men responsible for a receiving corps that dropped passes like they were going out of style. Or couldn't get the ball to the best receiver in football when he was in the endzone. He was a players' coach that was in over his head. Why do you think Greg Knapp is on the staff now? He's an experienced play caller that will either 1) help Sark be a better play caller, or 2) replace him if the offense does not improve this season. At least Quinn recognized that another voice on the offensive side of the ball was needed. Maybe that kick in the pants, along with last season's experience will turn Sark into an effective (or at least competent) OC.
  7. Dude. Can't wait to see him on the field.
  8. I dig this. It has style but isn't overstated. If the bird logo had the mirrored red in it, too, this would be bad a$$. I'm so ready to go back to red helmets. Tired of the black.
  9. We've been very lucky with Ridley and Oliver falling to us, but credit to the Falcons for recognizing that and making these picks. Can't believe we got these guys, and particularly the value where we picked them.
  10. Word. That's why I'm happy about this pick. Now we need to get a starting fullback. Then, no excuses for Sark this season.
  11. If a top flight WR, running back or O-lineman somehow drops to 26 I'd be more than fine with the Falcons picking them up.
  12. Yes, I believe FB is a glaring hole. I'm a big believer in the FB position, and Coleman was mediocre on those 22% of snaps. We either need a better FB or a bruising third RB for short yardage situations, which (if memory serves) we sucked at last year. Toilolo was a **** of a blocker and a seasoned veteran, something none of our current tight ends are. Replacing him with a rookie doesn't replace him. Gabriel was poorly utilized by Sark. He was a shifty, sure-handed, fast as heck WR that already knew the playbook. If Reggie Davis or Marvin Hall were already any better than him then Gabriel wouldn't have seen the field last season If you think quality depth at LB isn't important then I don't think we're watching the same NFL. And if you think we'll come out of a draft with day one starters at all these positions then I'd like to have a glass of what you're drinking.
  13. In my opinion? Guard (which they may have filled with Fusco). I think we have at least two holes at DT with Clayborn and Poe gone. Fullback is in glaring need of an upgrade; or since you need another running back with Ward gone you could get a bruiser for short yardage instead of replacing Derrick Coleman. Duke Riley didn't look ready for prime time, so I think linebacker is a need. I think with Toilolo gone (and Hooper less than stellar) we have a need at tight end. I think WR is a need. Beyond Julio and Sanu the talent gets pretty thin, especially with Gabriel gone. If we're relying on the draft to produce effective first year starters at two DT spots, fullback, linebacker, TE and WR then we're rolling the dice (or perhaps sacrificing the present for the future). Now, mabye one or two of those positions will get filled before the draft, but when it comes to these positions I think what's left out there in free agency is pretty thin.
  14. Schultz speaks the truth. I think the lack of activity in free agency means it's clear the Falcons are not looking at this season as "what do we need to get back to the playoffs right now". This team has huge holes at multiple positions, and they've only solved one of them (potentially) with the Fusco signing. I think Schultz is right that they are banking on continuing improvement, and what will have to be a cracking good draft to be in playoff contention again next year. There's wisdom in that strategy, but I disagree with it. You have a franchise quarterback (please don't argue about that here), and the greatest wide receiver in the game right now (in my opinion). Every season that passes brings you closer to a day when Matt and/or Julio will no longer be effective, or where your QB goes down due to injury and a season is lost. We're on the side where the window is closing, folks. That's why I was not a fan of the Sark hire before last season even started. You're banking on an unknown/unproven coordinator, when you need to win right bloody now. We didn't and don't have time for him to turn into an effective coordinator, and we saw the results. I believe the clock is ticking. Either the front office doesn't agree with me, or they know something I don't (which is certainly possible).