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Brewcrew

Pure Football
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  1. Thanks
    Brewcrew reacted to Tim Mazetti in Matt talking about Pitts   
    "A ball snatcher" eh? Lets go burn some LBs' and DBs'.
  2. Thanks
    Brewcrew reacted to ADAMSVILLE GYM in Trading Julio Jones   
  3. Like
    Brewcrew reacted to Killing Floor in Trading Julio Jones   
    I like him.  14 minutes and No BS T-Shirt Slogans.  He tells you what he wants to be released and doesn't make gaffs and he knows how to give an interview without giving away the wheel.  I can't wait to see how him and AS sort it all out.  Beat the Aints.  Beat the Bucs.  Beat the Panthers.  Let's Go!
  4. Haha
    Brewcrew reacted to Falcons Fan MVP in Any chance Filepe Franks will be the Falcons future QB?   
    That's true. However the football God's owe the Atlanta Falcons the next Tom Brady and Bill Bellicheck on a silver platter all we've been through. LoL
  5. Like
    Brewcrew got a reaction from Falcons Fan MVP in Any chance Filepe Franks will be the Falcons future QB?   
    The failure rate for late round QBs, let alone UDFAs, is probably 99+%.  I’m going to have to see something really special on the field before I get even a tiny modicum of hope that he can fill Matt Ryan’s shoes when he decides to hang them up.  
  6. Haha
    Brewcrew reacted to The Great American in eplayerj is in the house!!!!!   
    I remember the name ... I just can't remember if I liked him or not.  I think I did!  
     
  7. Like
    Brewcrew reacted to 408Falcon in Radio   
    I thought this was another Raheem Morris thread! But then I realized FalconsFanMVP didn't post it! 
  8. Thanks
    Brewcrew reacted to AUTiger7222 in Terry Fontenot: "Rebuilding Really Isn't In Our Vocabulary"   
    All the tankers and "get rid of Matt Ryan" folks ain't gonna be happy hearing this!! All the "Falcons won't win 4 games this year" folks ain't gonna be happy to hear this..
  9. Like
  10. Like
    Brewcrew reacted to ya_boi_j in Building blocks: Chris Lindstrom   
    The Falcons entered the 2019 NFL Draft set on reshaping their offensive line. They took two in the first round, including a guard far higher than guards normally go.
    Chris Lindstrom was well worth the lofty pick. The No. 14 overall selection has thrived on the right side, living up to sky-high expectations coming out of Boston College. He's a road grader in the run game and a steady pass protector. He's a vocal leader and a tone setter with tough, physical play on the inside.
    He played 1,122 offensive snaps in 2020 and allowed just 29 total quarterback pressures, per analytics site Pro Football Focus, including four sacks. He operated well in both zone and power/gap run schemes last season, with the Falcons averaging 4.5 yards per carry between him and the center and 4.2 between him and the right tackle. He's also adept in blocking space, with solid agility for someone his size.
    Last season offered the first glimpse of how good Lindstrom could be after his rookie year was sapped by a foot injury. The best remains ahead for someone who should be a consistent presence along the offensive front for years to come. He'll be under contract through 2023 if his fifth-year option gets picked up and is the type a team should build around up front.
    He'll continue to grow working next to fellow 2019 first-round pick and starting right tackle Kaleb McGary, who hasn't been as strong to this point. McGary has graded out well at times but PFF stats suggest he needs to be more consistent in pass protection.
    Guard is a historically underrated position, though that's starting to change these days. We're seeing top guards getting paid handsomely, with several recognized for work most casual fans ignore or don't fully understand. New head coach Arthur Smith certainly respects interior efforts after playing the position at North Carolina. He knows he has a good one in Lindstrom.
    Having a quality player and staple working on a rookie deal will allow the Falcons to focus resources on other spots in their attempts to solidify the offensive front and a run game that needs overall improvement. His leadership role should expand with experience, especially if he performs as well in 2021 as he did last season. Lindstrom as the personality for it and has clearly garnered respect in the Falcons locker room.
    He has lived up to the No. 14 overall pick two years back and could lead a youth movement up front if McGary improves, Matt Hennessy performs well at center after being Alex Mack's understudy and rookie Jalen Mayfield can eventually take hold at left guard or another spot along the line. Veteran left tackle Jake Matthews will be around for a while longer and is a staple at his position, but Lindstrom should be there to take the baton and lead the line into the future. The offense will have different personnel in a few seasons, so the Falcons need Lindstrom to continually improve and provide stability at a spot too often taken for granted.
    Falcons Building Blocks: Chris Lindstrom a stabilizing force along offensive line (atlantafalcons.com)
  11. Like
    Brewcrew reacted to JD dirtybird21 in I am not excited for this season for some reason   
    I find this upcoming season far more interesting than either of the last 2. 
  12. Like
    Brewcrew reacted to Knight of God in Silver lining of not drafting Justin Fields   
    I remember, a couple years ago. Someone asked the question. If a FB was the best player in the draft, like led his team in receptions and YAC, led the league in Short Yardage 1st downs, led the team in all around TDs, and was blocking like a OL and all from the FB position...just the proven all around BPD and then at the combine shows up at 6' 245lbs 35" vert, BR of 37, runs the 40 in 4.55 seconds but leads everyone else in broad jump, 3 cone, just everything. Would you let him slide past you because he's a FB? 
    Yeah, they would and someone would have a 1st round player in the 3rd or 4th. NFL logic. Pitts should have been the first overall. You don't have to like him, but it goes back to position prejudice and not knowing value from system to system. Pitts is NOT a traditional TE. He's Shannon Sharpe type talent. By next season, he is likely to be the most dangerous player on the team. This fanbase cries about wanting a Kelce or Kittle type, well you got one. 
  13. Haha
    Brewcrew got a reaction from NCFalconfan in This place is still here? Any old timers still around?   
    It's the Hotel California man... Of course we're all still here! 
     
  14. Haha
    Brewcrew got a reaction from HASHBROWN3 in This place is still here? Any old timers still around?   
    It's the Hotel California man... Of course we're all still here! 
     
  15. Like
    Brewcrew got a reaction from PokerSteve in This place is still here? Any old timers still around?   
    It's the Hotel California man... Of course we're all still here! 
     
  16. Haha
    Brewcrew got a reaction from thanat0s in This place is still here? Any old timers still around?   
    It's the Hotel California man... Of course we're all still here! 
     
  17. Haha
    Brewcrew got a reaction from Herr Doktor in This place is still here? Any old timers still around?   
    It's the Hotel California man... Of course we're all still here! 
     
  18. Thanks
    Brewcrew reacted to Goober Pyle in ‘Sometimes different is better’: How the 2011 lockout helped Arthur Smith build his Falcons staff - The Athletic   
    by Tori McElhaney
     
    When Arthur Smith put his coaching staff together as a first-time head coach in Atlanta, some trends started to emerge with every name announced. One of the most obvious trends was Smith wanting people he trusted but not people who would bow to his every whim. He wanted connection, not devotion.
    To find that, he looked to connections he made over the years, which is how the Falcons came to hire individuals like offensive coordinator Dave Ragone, quarterbacks coach Charles London and linebackers coach Frank Bush. This trio was with Smith when he was a defensive quality control coach for the Tennessee Titans in 2011.
    If you know anything about the 2011 offseason, you know it played out like a story on the stage. There was a conflict and resolution, humor and butting heads, uncertainty and a great deal of patience. But through it, Smith found a handful of coaches he could connect with, and later, hire. In many ways, that 2011 season is a foundation of what Smith is building with the Falcons a full decade later.
    The starring roles 
    Arthur Smith: Defensive assistant/quality control | Dave Ragone: Wide receivers coach | Charles London: Offensive assistant/quality control | Frank Bush: Linebackers coach
    Ragone always knew he wanted to be a part of a coaching staff with Smith again. Even in 2011, when the two were coaching on different sides of the ball and Smith was merely a quality control specialist, Ragone could see a future he hoped one day would connect the two. London and Bush believed the same. So, this is where these three future Atlanta assistants would meet the future Falcons head coach, and each other, too.
    “In this profession, there are people you gravitate towards and you want to work with,” Ragone said. “If you’ve worked with them previously, you want to work with them again, in any capacity. … It started with being somewhere, working with someone that you have an admiration for on a professional and personal level.”
    That “somewhere” was Nashville. That “someone” for Ragone, was Smith.
    The setting 
    A closet in Tennessee
    It’s hard to call Smith and London’s office in Tennessee an office. London said it was a glorified broom closet. The two assistants sat back-to-back. And for nine months in that tiny space, they planned, they chatted and they argued.
    “He’s a UNC grad,” London said of Smith. 
    “I am a Duke grad,” he said of himself. 
    Their discussions became quite heated at times.
    “Gosh, that was 10 years ago,” London said with a laugh. 
    Both graduated from the broom closet just as quickly as they entered it, but they cherished that time, even if they never could quite get away from each other. And even if they didn’t know how long they would be there …
    The conflict
    The NFL lockout
    Bush remembers the anticipation of 2011 the most. Head coach Mike Munchak had spent the offseason putting together his staff at Tennessee. And just as Bush and the rest of the assistants were getting their feet under them in Nashville, things came to a boiling point in the collective bargaining discussions with owners and players across the league.
    Bush said this Tennessee staff was ramped up, ready to dive headfirst into new roles with a new team.
    “And then, all of a sudden, there was nothing,” Bush recalled.
    Team owners and the National Football League Players Association could not come to a consensus regarding the new collective bargaining agreement. So, the owners locked out the players from team facilities. The league’s operation came to a screeching halt. For 18 weeks and four days, there was — as Bush put it — “nothing to do.”
    There was no free agency, no OTAs, no training camp. Players couldn’t work out or even enter the team facilities. They could not communicate with coaches. This was a new staff’s worst nightmare, not unlike the pandemic’s effects on the league in 2020.
    “At that point, I was probably our best linebacker on the team,” Bush joked, “because we just didn’t get a chance to see those kids.”
    The resolution
    Lasting connection
    The lockout didn’t end until the first week of August, when players finally reported to their respected team facilities. Before then, all coaches could do was sit and wait for negotiations to cease and a new CBA to be put in place. For Ragone, he said not knowing how any of this would shake out and having no knowledge of when players would arrive actually allowed the Tennessee staff to become really close in ways some staffs can’t.
    “We were going out after work,” Ragone said, “and getting to know each other on a personal level.”
    He and London used the same turn of phrase when thinking back to that time: That this staff went deeper in their relationships, “more than the Xs and Os,” both said.
    “I think that is what that year provided for us because there were no players around until the first week in August,” London noted. “So, it really was just football (talk), but it was also getting to know each other.”
    Even though this staff would part ways not long after the 2011 season — Munchak was dismissed after the 2013 season — there are discussions and memories Bush still carries with him from the lockout period.
    “We learned a lot of football,” Bush said, “because everything I thought I knew, somebody knew something different. Sometimes different is better.”
    This is a philosophy Smith has carried with him to this day. In his first press conference as Falcons head coach in January, Smith said he didn’t want to be surrounded by “yes men.” He wanted heated discussions and different ideas. He didn’t want to agree. He wanted contention. Looking back, it’s something these assistants can see started in the uncertainty of the lockout.
    Ragone said they challenged each other during this time. It wasn’t always beers after work. Or late-night dinners. Football philosophies clashed and came back together. Challenges were discussed and worked through. A new, deeper degree of collaboration was born out of this time because this staff had the time and “mutual respect” to allow it to flourish.
    “Not just always agreeing with what each other thought but asking thought-provoking questions,” Ragone continued. 
    And through it all…
    “There were a lot of relationships and bonds formed there during that 2011 season that still carry forth to today,” London said.
     
     
     
  19. Haha
    Brewcrew got a reaction from Rev_Hal in This place is still here? Any old timers still around?   
    It's the Hotel California man... Of course we're all still here! 
     
  20. Like
    Brewcrew got a reaction from PokerSteve in The Falcons defense should be slightly above average under Dean Pees.   
    In 12-years as a DC on 3 different teams he's only had 1 year where he wasn't top half in scoring defense, and only 2 where he wasn't top half in yards.  That said, while I know our personnel is better than our previous record, this might be the weakest personnel he's had compared to those 12-years.   Some of those New England and Baltimore defenses he had were stacked.    
  21. Like
    Brewcrew reacted to HASHBROWN3 in Falcons HC Arthur Smith on why he drafted Kyle Pitts   
    Anyone who knows Chris Collinsworth understands that he’s never really been a supporter of our club.  Plenty of CC game coverage examples of his sheer unwillingness to be objective while calling our games.  To the point that it’s not unfair to admit that he didn’t seem to care much about making a case for the Falcons on the air.  
    To his credit in this interview, he definitely sharpened his harpoon & got right after the two most vulnerable Atlanta Falcon transactions.  Almost as though his view was the opposite & he was going to hit AS respectfully between the eyes with it & challenge him with it.  CC, imho,  is a pompous, politically correct & arrogant media prop whose rarely ever challenged by his colleagues.  As a Falcons fan, I have reached a point at times while he’s covering our games, where I literally have had to turn the volume off in order to keep my blood pressure down.  
    I say all that only to say this… The more I watch AS, the more I realize just how incredibly articulate & careful he is.  We’ve desperately needed a man of his stature here for some time.  It was masterful how he diffused those loaded questions from CC.  They were dripping with contempt IMO. And yet AS outmaneuvered Collinsworth like a champ.
    Collinsworth would like nothing more than to eat our lunch in hindsight, hoping our strategy fails.  But AS crafted his remarks so well that it sort of diffused the pointed nature of why we didn’t go & do what the media *** clowns needed us to do.
    Great job AS.  That was impressive sir.  Go screw yourself Chris.  You were respectful but we know who you really are bro. 
  22. Like
    Brewcrew reacted to athell in NFL 2 Helmet Rule Back in 2022   
    Best helmet/uni/logo combo in the league don't @ me 😤
  23. Thanks
    Brewcrew got a reaction from duckhoa in The Falcons defense should be slightly above average under Dean Pees.   
    In 12-years as a DC on 3 different teams he's only had 1 year where he wasn't top half in scoring defense, and only 2 where he wasn't top half in yards.  That said, while I know our personnel is better than our previous record, this might be the weakest personnel he's had compared to those 12-years.   Some of those New England and Baltimore defenses he had were stacked.    
  24. Thanks
    Brewcrew got a reaction from Falcons Fan MVP in The Falcons defense should be slightly above average under Dean Pees.   
    In 12-years as a DC on 3 different teams he's only had 1 year where he wasn't top half in scoring defense, and only 2 where he wasn't top half in yards.  That said, while I know our personnel is better than our previous record, this might be the weakest personnel he's had compared to those 12-years.   Some of those New England and Baltimore defenses he had were stacked.    
  25. Haha
    Brewcrew reacted to Jesus in Isaiah Oliver moving to Free Safety   
    Coaching, you say.
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