jidady

Pure Football
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Everything posted by jidady

  1. I think the real mystery in all of this is what Freeney did for Beasley that turned him into such a terror that year. We should have given Freeney a five-year contract just to chew Vic's a$$ out between series to keep him going.
  2. Since we're in the offseason now, I figure I'll get a bit random. Did I ever tell you all that I saw Greg Maddux at Walt Disney World? We were in a secluded area of the Grand Floridian, and I almost knocked him down a flight of stairs. I turned around, and he was right behind me at the top of the stairs. We both kind of stumbled to avoid a collision. He looked...tubby. I mean, he looked like a guy who hadn't lifted a finger since he retired. I also saw Richie Incognito on the same trip. His size is frankly incomprehensible in person. You never see his legs because of his uniform. In shorts, you can tell that they're legitimately tree trunks. He actually held the door for my in-laws, smiled sweetly, and made small talk with us as we walked from Bay Lake Tower to the Contemporary. The whole time, I'm thinking that I've badmouthed this guy for years, yet he's being delightful with my family. Within a month, he got institutionalized for his behavior at a Boca Raton gym. So, I guess Disney just brought out the best in him.
  3. Yeah, I haven't seen him enough to comment on the defense. We didn't get MilB.tv this year, only MLB.tv. 28 homers in 306 at bats is undeniably an attention-grabbing stat. It's just that he looked so overwhelmed with Atlanta. I'm forcing myself to remember that Klesko went hitless during his first cup of coffee in the majors, too.
  4. It's entirely possible. I've never been a huge fan of Payton, whereas I loved Brees going back to Purdue. But the Payton/Brees combo may be the secret sauce that has made them both Hall of Famers.
  5. I blame Rivers because he's always been a jerk to his team, and they hate him for it. He's legit the least liked QB I've ever seen. And he brings it on himself. Two months ago, he randomly threw Gordon under the bus during contract negotiations by saying the Chargers didn't need him. Then, he's ranting last night that everyone but Gordon quit. We're in week six, and he's already backstabbed everyone on his offense.
  6. He's pacing for a 1,140-yard season.
  7. I watched every game I could that season. I say again that the only team that other execs believed was tanking was Boston. San Antonio was a franchise in turmoil due to Rodman's postseason meltdown the prior year, Hill's losing the team, and injuries wiping out 60% of their starting lineup.
  8. Anyone who says that is engaging in revisionist history. Bob Hill and Dennis Rodman (who wasn't even there anymore) had that team in turmoil. Pops was the GM at the time and was so frustrated by the underachieving that he took over the head coaching gig. I didn't even mention it in the previous reply but Rifleman missed the entire year, too. Their best player in 96 was Dominique Wilkins (!), who was 37 at the time.
  9. Yeah, we're starting to see it bleed over into other sports. Miami is actively tanking. The team said it'd revolt if they traded Tunsil. Then, they traded Tunsil. It's that sort of thing. But the comments people are making here are right. Tanking's potential benefits diminish with the number of players on the field. In a five-on-five game, a superstar can carry a team like Wade did with Miami before LeBron ever got there. In MLB, it has to be what happened with Houston where all of the position players turn out, allowing them to trade for pitchers. In the NFL, the Jets tried it, and Mangini wound up never getting a head coaching gig again. With 11 on 11, there's just too much going on for a single non-QB to make that kind of an impact. And even the great QBs can only do so much. Green Bay's 23-22-1 over the past three seasons.
  10. The Falcons not having a pass rush is my personal Groundhog Day.
  11. On the plus side, we're getting the Rams at the perfect time. They're a mess right now.
  12. I completely agree with this. They wildly overreacted to Kaeding missing that field goal attempt. But the real mistake was picking Rivers over Brees. I said at the time that picking the guy that everybody hates over the one that everyone loves would wreck them. That's exactly what happened. The whole thing creates a fascinating bit of alternate football history. If Saban gets the medical clearance to sign Brees, who knows what happens in the NFL and the NCAA ever since then?
  13. David Johnson is a WR a lot of the time, and he's a dominant talent. But that's not why I'm replying. I've watched Arizona play a lot over the past three years. Fitz may be old, but he's still a stud in the league.
  14. You named two, and one of those is wrong. The Spurs didn't tank. David Robinson had a bad back that kept him out two months. While he was gone, Sean Elliott got hurt. Then, Robinson came back and promptly broke his foot, ending his season. They didn't tank. They just didn't have their best two players. To a larger point, for a situation that you're stating is so cut and dried, it's interesting that you've only named one example in any sport. Also, Boston tanked like crazy the Tim Duncan year. They drafted #3 and #6 after losing the lottery. Pitino got fired with a 102-146 record as Celtics coach/GM. That's how tanking almost always works. Across all sports, the only undeniable example of successful tanking is the Houston Astros, and it happened for two reasons. One is that they hit on several high MLB draft choices, a mathematical impossibility in a sport where 40% of first round picks never make the majors. The other is that they revolutionized analytics in the sport to the degree that a division competitor committed federal crimes to steal their data. Otherwise, tanking is something that many teams have tried. They've had no problem with the losing part. It's the winning championships part that hasn't gone well. I mean, the Lakers tanked for several years and just gave away almost all of those players in a single trade. Philly's still begging fans to Trust the Process despite the fact that most of the players they drafted that way have washed out.
  15. When has TD ever traded down in the first round? The whole exercise is chaos theory since there's no way to know/prove where we would be if we'd selected in a different position. All we know for sure is that we took a guy who showed signs of greatness, only to get seriously injured in his first game. After 2016, Atlanta looked like it had nailed the Beasley pick. Circling back to Mark Sanchez, after his consecutive AFC Championship appearances, everyone thought he was the next great QB. The Falcons have even had this happen fairly recently. Peria Jerry looked like a stud in camp and was in the backfield a lot his two games. Then, he hurt his knee and was never the same. People fetishize high draft picks like they're magic beans. The reality is that it takes 53 guys. But any exercise that involves woulda/coulda about last year's draft should begin with an acknowledgment that Atlanta took a fine-looking player who immediately went down for the body of the season.
  16. No one said every year, but he's absolutely someone expected to become an All-Pro. Any OG who goes in the top 20 of the draft is, unless it's just a horrifically thin year.
  17. And everyone believed that Lindstrom would be a perennial All-Pro before the injury. In fact, he made believers of his former Pro Bowl/All-Pro teammates when he played through a broken foot in week one. As for Williams, a top 5 pick wouldn't have been enough since he went #3. The Jets were 4-12 last year, which means that even if we had tanked, we weren't guaranteed that spot. So, he was never in play for us, barring a trade up AFTER tanking.
  18. I fully agree with your last sentence. It's the idea that any win is pointless where you lose me. As someone else said, it's the crux of this debate and something where people will never line up. I've watched too many teams try to stack the deck for the draft only to make terrible selections to believe that tanking is a good play. But that wasn't the purpose of this thread. It exists as a meanness. The point that nobody can argue is the most appropriate one for this thread. A draft pick is absolutely useless no matter who it is or where in the draft it happens when that player isn't playing.
  19. Everything you say is 100% right here, but I'd still rather root for Arthur Blank than Belicheck in any aspect of life. I'm extremely proud that he's our owner. He's one of the few good people who own sports teams. But I can't blame Blank for any of this. I read every bit of Falcons football analysis I can find all year long. Even the most cynical people worried about our defense never projected this. I think the lowest win total I saw for us was 7-9. Why would our owner think any differently?
  20. The answer is that it depends. The team has to draft the right person, and that person has to stay healthy enough to make an impact. Otherwise, they're counting more against the cap. We're unfortunately at the time of year where everyone forgets how many top 10 picks are busts. The top three of 2015 went Winston/Mariota/Dante Fowler. The next three were Cooper, Scherff, and Williams. The three after that were Kevin White, Vic, and Ereck Flowers. Picking in the top would have been great if teams had picked the right guy, which most of us at the time agreed was Leonard Williams. Somehow, he went #6.
  21. 1) Winning is winning. It's a tautology. 2) We could have used Chris Lindstrom. Nobody helps when they're hurt.
  22. I've spent 20 years here arguing in favor of trading down, so I agree on that point. As for Greene vs. Julio, people debated that point going back to when they were high school sophomores, but nobody ever doubted that either of them would be an otherworldly NFL player. Atlanta actually offered a bit more in 2011 to skip up to #2, but Denver sussed out that we wanted Von Miller.
  23. As someone else said, that sort of reduction means that 31 out of 32 teams fail every year. And there's no one true path to that trophy. After all, Belicheck has notoriously struggled in the draft over the past 10 years, a point I haven't even brought up yet while refuting the original poster's nonsense. So, high draft picks aren't the best path. It's whatever he's doing. Teams with perennial high draft picks seem more likely to stay down, which is the aspect of this discussion that seems more interesting imo. Look at Tampa Bay and Miami as examples. Save for a five-season run, Cincy's been terrible for the body of 25 years.
  24. Exactly. But that didn't stop you from starting a thread about the importance of first round picks when ours is currently out for 12 weeks.