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TheDirtyWordII

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  1. Like
    TheDirtyWordII reacted to D.B.N. in A TDWII Observation: Things are bad - Mods Deleting Good Football Talk   
    So much for “free speech”
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    TheDirtyWordII got a reaction from tbhawksfan in *** Official Panthers Vs Falcons In-game Thread ***   
    You’re a little late to the game...I also accept your apology
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    TheDirtyWordII got a reaction from Dirtier Bird in *** Official Panthers Vs Falcons In-game Thread ***   
    WHAT ELSE HE IS SUPPOSED TO DOOOOOOO?????!!!!!!
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    TheDirtyWordII got a reaction from ZoneOne01 in *** Official Panthers Vs Falcons In-game Thread ***   
    WHAT ELSE HE IS SUPPOSED TO DOOOOOOO?????!!!!!!
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    TheDirtyWordII got a reaction from Mid-Nite-Toker in *** Official Panthers Vs Falcons In-game Thread ***   
    WHAT ELSE HE IS SUPPOSED TO DOOOOOOO?????!!!!!!
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    TheDirtyWordII got a reaction from Bunchy Carter in The Athletic - Does Matt Ryan Belong in the Hall of Fame...   
    The absense of this article on AFMB felt conspicuous.  Bottom line is his best comparison historically is Ken Anderson - I agree...
    At some point during Monday’s loss to the Packers, as Matt Ryan and the banged-up Atlanta offense labored through yet another drive, a random thought about the Falcons’ quarterback crossed my mind: Is Matt Ryan a Hall of Famer? In the span of about a minute, my answer changed about five times.
    Hall of Fame debates are often complicated, but Ryan’s case is particularly knotty. Any answer from “of course” to “of course not” would seem reasonable. Ryan has an MVP award, but 2016 was also the only time he was ever voted first- or second-team All-Pro. He ranks ninth all time in passing yards, but those numbers are inflated by today’s pass-happy approach. Every argument in Ryan’s favor seems to have a counter.
    This may seem like an odd time to legislate Ryan’s Hall of Fame credentials, but maybe it’s not. Ryan is 35. He’s been Atlanta’s starter for 13 seasons, the same number Aaron Rodgers has started in Green Bay. And as the Falcons wade through yet another tough start and changes loom, it’s possible Ryan could have to juggle a new staff and system during the final productive years he and Julio Jones will spend in Atlanta. It wouldn’t be outrageous to say the most relevant parts of Ryan’s resume are already set in stone. So, taking all those factors into account, I wanted to answer a seemingly simple question — does Ryan belong in the Hall of Fame? — with a fairly tangled answer.
    Before digging into the evidence, let’s acknowledge something: If the Falcons had held onto their lead and beaten New England in Super Bowl LI, Ryan would almost certainly be in. Joe Theismann is the only quarterback to win an MVP and a Super Bowl and not make the Hall of Fame, and his career numbers are nowhere near Ryan’s, even adjusted for era. With a Super Bowl win in his back pocket, Ryan’s career accolades would look similar to Hall of Famers like Joe Namath and Kenny Stabler, who won one Super Bowl and some version of an MVP (Namath’s came during his AFL days; Stabler took home the current award in 1974). Super Bowl wins are a massive part of the equation when it comes to Hall of Fame inclusion. Guys with considerably worse numbers than Ryan have gotten in thanks to their postseason success, and only five modern-era quarterbacks without a title have made it to Canton. If Ryan avoids getting sacked by Dont’a Hightower or Julian Edelman doesn’t get his fingers under the ball, he’s probably wearing a gold jacket someday. That’s how slim the margins are. But you don’t have to tell that to Falcons fans.
    Even without the ring, though, Ryan’s body of work is still incredibly impressive. As noted, Ryan ranks ninth all time with 52,432 passing yards and will likely still be there by season’s end (Eli Manning, in eighth place, has about 4,500 yards on him). With 15 more touchdown passes, Ryan would pass Fran Tarkenton for 10th all time. Moving to his rate stats, Ryan has the 12th-best adjusted net yards per attempt average at 6.76. Unsurprisingly, that list is dominated by current players who’ve benefited from a considerable uptick in passing efficiency (Kirk Cousins and Jared Goff are tied for 10th at 6.82).
    Comparing stats across eras can be tricky, but Pro Football Reference has put a considerable amount of effort into making it possible. The Adjusted Passing indices try to account for how a quarterback compares to his contemporaries by assigning a single number to stats like completion percentage, adjusted net yards per attempt and others. A score of 100 is average and every 15 points represents one standard deviation from average. I thought it’d be useful to look at the five modern-era quarterbacks who’ve made the Hall of Fame without winning a Super Bowl and compare their numbers with Ryan’s.
    Of all the adjusted passing stats at Pro Football Reference, adjusted net yards per attempt — which takes into account yards per attempt, touchdowns, interceptions and sacks — probably paints the most accurate picture for how well quarterbacks played across eras. For our purposes, I looked at the percentage of seasons those six quarterbacks were at 115 or above, the number of seasons they were below 100, their career averages and how many times they were voted first- or second-team All-Pro. Collectively, those numbers provide a solid idea of how often the numbers said a quarterback was truly elite, how often they say he was below average, what a typical season looked like and how often they were perceived as elite.
    Adjusted Net Yards Per Attempt
    Name Seasons % of seasons at 115+ % of seasons below 100 Average 1st or 2nd team All Pro Dan Fouts 15 46.7 26.7 114.4 4 Jim Kelly 11 18 18.2 109.45 2 Dan Marino 17 70.6 5.9 119.4 4 Warren Moon 15 20 33.3 106.3 1 Fran Tarkenton*  18 55.6 27.8 110.8 2 Matt Ryan 12 25 25 110.25 1 * — Due to available data, Tarkenton’s numbers are based off adjusted yards/attempt 
    Looking at those numbers, Ryan seems to stack up pretty well. He’s behind two of the most prolific passers in Dan Marino and Dan Fouts, just behind Tarkenton and ahead of Jim Kelly and Warren Moon. Digging a little deeper, though, there are spots where Ryan’s resume diverges. Moon entered the league at 28 and his exclusion from the league out of college, along with his incredible production in the CFL, likely contributed to him being voted in. Despite never winning the big one, Tarkenton and Kelly made multiple Super Bowl appearances for defining teams of their decades. If Atlanta edged out the 49ers in the 2012 NFC Championship Game and Ryan’s Super Bowl appearances doubled to two, the conversation likely shifts a bit.
    Using Pro Football Reference’s similarity scores, we can see some of the other useful comps for Ryan. Of the 10 quarterbacks with careers most similar to Ryan, eight of them have been enshrined in Canton or are virtual locks to eventually get in: Joe Montana, Roger Staubach, John Elway, Russell Wilson (who’s on track), Rodgers, Fouts, Marino and Kelly. But the two who aren’t guaranteed Hall of Famers might actually be more telling.
    When I brought up Ryan’s Hall of Fame case to The Athletic’s Mike Sando, a Hall of Fame voter, Anderson was the first name he mentioned. The similarities between Ryan’s and Anderson’s careers is kind of eerie.
    PLAYER AVG ANY/A MVP SEASON AGE PLAYOFF WINNING % 1ST OR 2ND TEAM ALL PRO SUPER BOWL APPEARANCES Matt Ryan 110.25 31 40 1 1 Ken Anderson 110.6 32 33.3 2 1 Like Ryan, Anderson was a highly productive, winning quarterback for most of his career. Like Ryan, Anderson won his lone MVP award in his early 30s — only to lose in the Super Bowl to the defining dynasty of his era. (In Anderson’s case, that was Montana and Bill Walsh). Despite being a very good quarterback and franchise pillar in Cincinnati for more than a decade, Anderson was always a tier below a legendary group of quarterbacks that included Montana, Marino and Elway. In many ways, Anderson is the perfect comparison for Ryan, and 36 years after his final season, the Bengals great is still waiting for that knock on the door. He was one of 12 senior finalists in the Class of 2021 but was passed over in favor of former Cowboys wide receiver Drew Pearson. It’s possible that if Ryan continues on his path, he’s destined to wind up like Anderson.
    The other player with a similarity score in Ryan’s range is Philip Rivers, and a tale of the tape between those two brings up some other pressing questions about Ryan’s candidacy. Rivers and Ryan have almost completely overlapping careers as starters. When Ryan took over as the Falcons’ starter as a rookie in 2008, Rivers was entering his third season as the Chargers’ starting quarterback. The average adjusted net yards per attempt across Rivers’ 14 seasons with the Chargers was 112.9, slightly better than Ryan’s 110.3. Rivers hit the 115 mark or above in seven of those 14 seasons. He’s been to the Pro Bowl eight times, twice as many as Ryan. Rivers is missing Ryan’s MVP award and his Super Bowl appearance, but other than that, it’s easy to make the case Rivers has put together a more impressive career. And that’s where the case for Ryan takes a significant hit.
    Ryan’s lack of All-Pro honors shows how infrequently he was one of the best two quarterbacks in the NFL. But take it a step further. How often was Ryan one of the four best quarterbacks? One of the top six? When the Falcons went 13-3 in 2012 and barely missed getting to the Super Bowl, Ryan finished seventh with 7.03 adjusted net yards per attempt (ANY/A). You could argue Ryan’s second-best season, after his 2016 MVP campaign, was in 2018 as the Falcons finished 7-9. That year, Ryan finished fifth in ANY/A among quarterbacks with at least 10 starts — one spot behind Rivers. Ryan played the first half of his career in the shadow of Rodgers, Peyton Manning, Tom Brady and Drew Brees. In his twilight, he’s been overtaken by Patrick Mahomes, Lamar Jackson and the group of young quarterbacks that now owns the NFL.
    Compared to most quarterbacks, Ryan’s career has been remarkable. He ranks 22nd all time in Pro Football Reference’s approximate value. His presence has stabilized the Falcons. During Ryan’s tenure, the Falcons’ average finish in Football Outsiders’ offensive DVOA has been 11th. They’ve finished outside the top 15 only once — the year before Ryan and Kyle Shanahan took over the NFL in 2016. He’s started at least 14 games every year of his career. For a decade and a half, the Falcons have largely been relevant because Ryan was their quarterback. “Matt Ryan is, in my mind, the epitome of consistency,” Dimitroff said in 2016. “In how he approaches things, how he leads, his intelligence, his desire to get better.”
    Ryan has been the Falcons’ rock, but it’s easy to argue that for most of his career, he wasn’t even the scariest player on his offense. When teams assembled their game plans for the Falcons, Jones, not Ryan, was likely the focus of their plans. Numbers are helpful in exercises like this, but gut feel plays an important role, too. I don’t know how many times a defensive coordinator has lost sleep because Ryan was on the other sideline, or how many times I’ve looked at a slate of NFL games and said, “I can’t wait to watch Matt Ryan.”
    Maybe we have a collective blind spot for how rare a really good, reliable quarterback really is. Maybe if Ryan had his own version of the Sean Payton-Drew Brees partnership, we could have seen what he was truly capable of accomplishing. Maybe if Shanahan sticks around for three or four seasons, Ryan’s career and the conversation might be different. But as Ryan nears a decade and a half in the NFL, there’s a good chance his Hall of Fame chances suffer the same fate as the Falcons’ title hopes have too many times: falling short despite so much promise.
  8. Like
    TheDirtyWordII got a reaction from Dirtier Bird in The Athletic - Does Matt Ryan Belong in the Hall of Fame...   
    The absense of this article on AFMB felt conspicuous.  Bottom line is his best comparison historically is Ken Anderson - I agree...
    At some point during Monday’s loss to the Packers, as Matt Ryan and the banged-up Atlanta offense labored through yet another drive, a random thought about the Falcons’ quarterback crossed my mind: Is Matt Ryan a Hall of Famer? In the span of about a minute, my answer changed about five times.
    Hall of Fame debates are often complicated, but Ryan’s case is particularly knotty. Any answer from “of course” to “of course not” would seem reasonable. Ryan has an MVP award, but 2016 was also the only time he was ever voted first- or second-team All-Pro. He ranks ninth all time in passing yards, but those numbers are inflated by today’s pass-happy approach. Every argument in Ryan’s favor seems to have a counter.
    This may seem like an odd time to legislate Ryan’s Hall of Fame credentials, but maybe it’s not. Ryan is 35. He’s been Atlanta’s starter for 13 seasons, the same number Aaron Rodgers has started in Green Bay. And as the Falcons wade through yet another tough start and changes loom, it’s possible Ryan could have to juggle a new staff and system during the final productive years he and Julio Jones will spend in Atlanta. It wouldn’t be outrageous to say the most relevant parts of Ryan’s resume are already set in stone. So, taking all those factors into account, I wanted to answer a seemingly simple question — does Ryan belong in the Hall of Fame? — with a fairly tangled answer.
    Before digging into the evidence, let’s acknowledge something: If the Falcons had held onto their lead and beaten New England in Super Bowl LI, Ryan would almost certainly be in. Joe Theismann is the only quarterback to win an MVP and a Super Bowl and not make the Hall of Fame, and his career numbers are nowhere near Ryan’s, even adjusted for era. With a Super Bowl win in his back pocket, Ryan’s career accolades would look similar to Hall of Famers like Joe Namath and Kenny Stabler, who won one Super Bowl and some version of an MVP (Namath’s came during his AFL days; Stabler took home the current award in 1974). Super Bowl wins are a massive part of the equation when it comes to Hall of Fame inclusion. Guys with considerably worse numbers than Ryan have gotten in thanks to their postseason success, and only five modern-era quarterbacks without a title have made it to Canton. If Ryan avoids getting sacked by Dont’a Hightower or Julian Edelman doesn’t get his fingers under the ball, he’s probably wearing a gold jacket someday. That’s how slim the margins are. But you don’t have to tell that to Falcons fans.
    Even without the ring, though, Ryan’s body of work is still incredibly impressive. As noted, Ryan ranks ninth all time with 52,432 passing yards and will likely still be there by season’s end (Eli Manning, in eighth place, has about 4,500 yards on him). With 15 more touchdown passes, Ryan would pass Fran Tarkenton for 10th all time. Moving to his rate stats, Ryan has the 12th-best adjusted net yards per attempt average at 6.76. Unsurprisingly, that list is dominated by current players who’ve benefited from a considerable uptick in passing efficiency (Kirk Cousins and Jared Goff are tied for 10th at 6.82).
    Comparing stats across eras can be tricky, but Pro Football Reference has put a considerable amount of effort into making it possible. The Adjusted Passing indices try to account for how a quarterback compares to his contemporaries by assigning a single number to stats like completion percentage, adjusted net yards per attempt and others. A score of 100 is average and every 15 points represents one standard deviation from average. I thought it’d be useful to look at the five modern-era quarterbacks who’ve made the Hall of Fame without winning a Super Bowl and compare their numbers with Ryan’s.
    Of all the adjusted passing stats at Pro Football Reference, adjusted net yards per attempt — which takes into account yards per attempt, touchdowns, interceptions and sacks — probably paints the most accurate picture for how well quarterbacks played across eras. For our purposes, I looked at the percentage of seasons those six quarterbacks were at 115 or above, the number of seasons they were below 100, their career averages and how many times they were voted first- or second-team All-Pro. Collectively, those numbers provide a solid idea of how often the numbers said a quarterback was truly elite, how often they say he was below average, what a typical season looked like and how often they were perceived as elite.
    Adjusted Net Yards Per Attempt
    Name Seasons % of seasons at 115+ % of seasons below 100 Average 1st or 2nd team All Pro Dan Fouts 15 46.7 26.7 114.4 4 Jim Kelly 11 18 18.2 109.45 2 Dan Marino 17 70.6 5.9 119.4 4 Warren Moon 15 20 33.3 106.3 1 Fran Tarkenton*  18 55.6 27.8 110.8 2 Matt Ryan 12 25 25 110.25 1 * — Due to available data, Tarkenton’s numbers are based off adjusted yards/attempt 
    Looking at those numbers, Ryan seems to stack up pretty well. He’s behind two of the most prolific passers in Dan Marino and Dan Fouts, just behind Tarkenton and ahead of Jim Kelly and Warren Moon. Digging a little deeper, though, there are spots where Ryan’s resume diverges. Moon entered the league at 28 and his exclusion from the league out of college, along with his incredible production in the CFL, likely contributed to him being voted in. Despite never winning the big one, Tarkenton and Kelly made multiple Super Bowl appearances for defining teams of their decades. If Atlanta edged out the 49ers in the 2012 NFC Championship Game and Ryan’s Super Bowl appearances doubled to two, the conversation likely shifts a bit.
    Using Pro Football Reference’s similarity scores, we can see some of the other useful comps for Ryan. Of the 10 quarterbacks with careers most similar to Ryan, eight of them have been enshrined in Canton or are virtual locks to eventually get in: Joe Montana, Roger Staubach, John Elway, Russell Wilson (who’s on track), Rodgers, Fouts, Marino and Kelly. But the two who aren’t guaranteed Hall of Famers might actually be more telling.
    When I brought up Ryan’s Hall of Fame case to The Athletic’s Mike Sando, a Hall of Fame voter, Anderson was the first name he mentioned. The similarities between Ryan’s and Anderson’s careers is kind of eerie.
    PLAYER AVG ANY/A MVP SEASON AGE PLAYOFF WINNING % 1ST OR 2ND TEAM ALL PRO SUPER BOWL APPEARANCES Matt Ryan 110.25 31 40 1 1 Ken Anderson 110.6 32 33.3 2 1 Like Ryan, Anderson was a highly productive, winning quarterback for most of his career. Like Ryan, Anderson won his lone MVP award in his early 30s — only to lose in the Super Bowl to the defining dynasty of his era. (In Anderson’s case, that was Montana and Bill Walsh). Despite being a very good quarterback and franchise pillar in Cincinnati for more than a decade, Anderson was always a tier below a legendary group of quarterbacks that included Montana, Marino and Elway. In many ways, Anderson is the perfect comparison for Ryan, and 36 years after his final season, the Bengals great is still waiting for that knock on the door. He was one of 12 senior finalists in the Class of 2021 but was passed over in favor of former Cowboys wide receiver Drew Pearson. It’s possible that if Ryan continues on his path, he’s destined to wind up like Anderson.
    The other player with a similarity score in Ryan’s range is Philip Rivers, and a tale of the tape between those two brings up some other pressing questions about Ryan’s candidacy. Rivers and Ryan have almost completely overlapping careers as starters. When Ryan took over as the Falcons’ starter as a rookie in 2008, Rivers was entering his third season as the Chargers’ starting quarterback. The average adjusted net yards per attempt across Rivers’ 14 seasons with the Chargers was 112.9, slightly better than Ryan’s 110.3. Rivers hit the 115 mark or above in seven of those 14 seasons. He’s been to the Pro Bowl eight times, twice as many as Ryan. Rivers is missing Ryan’s MVP award and his Super Bowl appearance, but other than that, it’s easy to make the case Rivers has put together a more impressive career. And that’s where the case for Ryan takes a significant hit.
    Ryan’s lack of All-Pro honors shows how infrequently he was one of the best two quarterbacks in the NFL. But take it a step further. How often was Ryan one of the four best quarterbacks? One of the top six? When the Falcons went 13-3 in 2012 and barely missed getting to the Super Bowl, Ryan finished seventh with 7.03 adjusted net yards per attempt (ANY/A). You could argue Ryan’s second-best season, after his 2016 MVP campaign, was in 2018 as the Falcons finished 7-9. That year, Ryan finished fifth in ANY/A among quarterbacks with at least 10 starts — one spot behind Rivers. Ryan played the first half of his career in the shadow of Rodgers, Peyton Manning, Tom Brady and Drew Brees. In his twilight, he’s been overtaken by Patrick Mahomes, Lamar Jackson and the group of young quarterbacks that now owns the NFL.
    Compared to most quarterbacks, Ryan’s career has been remarkable. He ranks 22nd all time in Pro Football Reference’s approximate value. His presence has stabilized the Falcons. During Ryan’s tenure, the Falcons’ average finish in Football Outsiders’ offensive DVOA has been 11th. They’ve finished outside the top 15 only once — the year before Ryan and Kyle Shanahan took over the NFL in 2016. He’s started at least 14 games every year of his career. For a decade and a half, the Falcons have largely been relevant because Ryan was their quarterback. “Matt Ryan is, in my mind, the epitome of consistency,” Dimitroff said in 2016. “In how he approaches things, how he leads, his intelligence, his desire to get better.”
    Ryan has been the Falcons’ rock, but it’s easy to argue that for most of his career, he wasn’t even the scariest player on his offense. When teams assembled their game plans for the Falcons, Jones, not Ryan, was likely the focus of their plans. Numbers are helpful in exercises like this, but gut feel plays an important role, too. I don’t know how many times a defensive coordinator has lost sleep because Ryan was on the other sideline, or how many times I’ve looked at a slate of NFL games and said, “I can’t wait to watch Matt Ryan.”
    Maybe we have a collective blind spot for how rare a really good, reliable quarterback really is. Maybe if Ryan had his own version of the Sean Payton-Drew Brees partnership, we could have seen what he was truly capable of accomplishing. Maybe if Shanahan sticks around for three or four seasons, Ryan’s career and the conversation might be different. But as Ryan nears a decade and a half in the NFL, there’s a good chance his Hall of Fame chances suffer the same fate as the Falcons’ title hopes have too many times: falling short despite so much promise.
  9. Like
    TheDirtyWordII got a reaction from Osiruz in A TDWII Exercise: So How Did Ryan Perform in Those Pre-Quinn Collapses?   
    As many have looked to try and understand why the Falcons find themselves in the position they do today…there have been a lot of ‘culprits’ put up as sacrificial lambs as to why the Falcons are 14-22 in their last 36 and 53-63 in since the 2012 NFCCG collapse.  While the Falcons were generous enough to not snatch defeat out of the hands of victory against Green Bay this past week…the fact remains that the Falcons are a franchise in freefall. 
    A lot of that blame is being placed at the feet of Dan Quinn (amongst others)…and I would not disagree that Quinn is a primary culprit in the decay of the Falcons culture.  He needs to go and needed to go back at the conclusion of the 2019 season.  His ‘See No Evil, Hear No Evil, Speak No Evil’ approach to the Falcons performance which includes one meaningful win since November 2018 is not only frustrating to listen to week after week, but also maddening to watch permeate a fanbase that refuses to acknowledge the culpability of certain sacred cows related to this mess.
    Earlier this week, I put forth evidence that the collapse of this franchise, either measured on a week-to-week basis or a much longer period of time had roots prior to Quinn.  When you step back and see the picture as a whole…the turning point wasn’t 28-3, although that most certainly put the explanation point on cementing the legacy of the Ryan era, but rather the that 2012 NFCCG collapse.
    The ‘WHAT ELSE HE SUPPPOSED TO DOOOOOO????!!!!”ers came out in full force.  And I thought it necessary to dive deeper into Ryan’s performance in those pre-Quinn collapses.
    To refresh your memory in 5 collapses, the Falcons had built a cumulative lead of 106-54.  And Ryan was fire to those points in those respective games accumulating the following stat line:
    75 Completions
    111 Attempts
    864 Passing Yards
    67.6% Completion Rate
    7.78 YPA
    12 TD’s
    3 INT’s
    115.6 QB Rating
    In short, Ryan was a key factor in building those leads.  Much like you’d expect a franchise QB to be.  Now to…close…those……….games………………..out.  Well, after that, Ryan’s stat like was, um….not good.
    44 Completions
    78 Attempts
    487 Passing Yards
    56.4% Completion Rate
    6.24 YPA
    0 TD’s
    4 INT’s (and a fumble…don’t forget that perfectly snapped ball in the NFCCG)
    53.74 Passer Rating (which doesn’t include the fumble)
    Yes, folks…I bring you – Joey Harrington; The Sequel.  All prior to Quinn ever stepping foot in Flowery Branch.  To answer the question ‘WHAT ELSE IS HE SUPPOSED TO DOOOOOOOO????!!!!!’ my answer is…
    NOT THAT!
    But wait, there’s more…
    I also brought up the Colts game in 2015…the game Quinn was introduced to the Mr. Hyde version of Matt Ryan when the Falcons had a big lead in the second half.  How’d he do in that one?
    6/18 for 46 yards.  0 TD’s.  2 INT’s including a pick 6.  6 being the operative number there in that D’Qwell Jackson returned the INT 6 yards to put the Colts right back in that game.  I mean...a 6 yard pick-six? 🤢
    Yes, folks…the culture of choking around these parts.  It predates Dan Quinn.  And if we’re going to go with a whole new regime, I’d just assume not plant that choking seed for a third time as part of the new foundation.
    You’re welcome.
  10. Like
    TheDirtyWordII got a reaction from BLM in A TDWII Exercise: So How Did Ryan Perform in Those Pre-Quinn Collapses?   
    As many have looked to try and understand why the Falcons find themselves in the position they do today…there have been a lot of ‘culprits’ put up as sacrificial lambs as to why the Falcons are 14-22 in their last 36 and 53-63 in since the 2012 NFCCG collapse.  While the Falcons were generous enough to not snatch defeat out of the hands of victory against Green Bay this past week…the fact remains that the Falcons are a franchise in freefall. 
    A lot of that blame is being placed at the feet of Dan Quinn (amongst others)…and I would not disagree that Quinn is a primary culprit in the decay of the Falcons culture.  He needs to go and needed to go back at the conclusion of the 2019 season.  His ‘See No Evil, Hear No Evil, Speak No Evil’ approach to the Falcons performance which includes one meaningful win since November 2018 is not only frustrating to listen to week after week, but also maddening to watch permeate a fanbase that refuses to acknowledge the culpability of certain sacred cows related to this mess.
    Earlier this week, I put forth evidence that the collapse of this franchise, either measured on a week-to-week basis or a much longer period of time had roots prior to Quinn.  When you step back and see the picture as a whole…the turning point wasn’t 28-3, although that most certainly put the explanation point on cementing the legacy of the Ryan era, but rather the that 2012 NFCCG collapse.
    The ‘WHAT ELSE HE SUPPPOSED TO DOOOOOO????!!!!”ers came out in full force.  And I thought it necessary to dive deeper into Ryan’s performance in those pre-Quinn collapses.
    To refresh your memory in 5 collapses, the Falcons had built a cumulative lead of 106-54.  And Ryan was fire to those points in those respective games accumulating the following stat line:
    75 Completions
    111 Attempts
    864 Passing Yards
    67.6% Completion Rate
    7.78 YPA
    12 TD’s
    3 INT’s
    115.6 QB Rating
    In short, Ryan was a key factor in building those leads.  Much like you’d expect a franchise QB to be.  Now to…close…those……….games………………..out.  Well, after that, Ryan’s stat like was, um….not good.
    44 Completions
    78 Attempts
    487 Passing Yards
    56.4% Completion Rate
    6.24 YPA
    0 TD’s
    4 INT’s (and a fumble…don’t forget that perfectly snapped ball in the NFCCG)
    53.74 Passer Rating (which doesn’t include the fumble)
    Yes, folks…I bring you – Joey Harrington; The Sequel.  All prior to Quinn ever stepping foot in Flowery Branch.  To answer the question ‘WHAT ELSE IS HE SUPPOSED TO DOOOOOOOO????!!!!!’ my answer is…
    NOT THAT!
    But wait, there’s more…
    I also brought up the Colts game in 2015…the game Quinn was introduced to the Mr. Hyde version of Matt Ryan when the Falcons had a big lead in the second half.  How’d he do in that one?
    6/18 for 46 yards.  0 TD’s.  2 INT’s including a pick 6.  6 being the operative number there in that D’Qwell Jackson returned the INT 6 yards to put the Colts right back in that game.  I mean...a 6 yard pick-six? 🤢
    Yes, folks…the culture of choking around these parts.  It predates Dan Quinn.  And if we’re going to go with a whole new regime, I’d just assume not plant that choking seed for a third time as part of the new foundation.
    You’re welcome.
  11. Like
    TheDirtyWordII got a reaction from Vandy in A TDWII Exercise: So How Did Ryan Perform in Those Pre-Quinn Collapses?   
    So, for me...the reason I'm really banging the drum on Ryan is that I don't care about any other version of the Falcons other that the 2021 version and beyond.  I thought TD/DQ should have been fired last year.  At the same time, I also thought (and still do) that any rebuild needs to be from scratch. 
    What's happened thus far this year IMO hasn't been entirely unpredictable even though the means by which we are here is improbable.  If the extension of time DQ/TD received has any benefit, I think making a call on Ryan NOT being part of the 2021 and beyond Falcons might be more feasible.  And for anyone who says it'll kill the cap - who cares.  We're in rebuild mode, although I'd MUCH prefer a trade and would think there would be teams interested for sure.
    But when fan sentiment protects him at every turn and deflects culpability away from him, public pressure to move on from him is low and that offers a greater opportunity for Blank to position Ryan as an asset to prospective GM/HC candidates.  If you look at CAR and Matt Rhule...David Tepper made a tough call in letting Cam Newton go, but he wanted to give his handpicked regime a fresh slate.  To date, the looks like the right call.
    As for why it didn't work here, at this juncture it doesn't matter that much.  but we need to all acknowledge that for the last 8 years save for a brief shining moment, it hasn't.  And Ryan, whether you believe he is the cause for that underachievement or isn't, is still the most influential person other than Blank associated with the Falcons.  He's had the Captain's C on his uniform for a decade.
    If we let him slide while others lose their jobs (consider the 2 losses in 2014 in the OP were the difference between the Falcons making the playoffs and not - maybe Mike Smith gets another year if we win those two games)...what does it say about who the Falcons are?
     
  12. Thanks
    TheDirtyWordII got a reaction from Hurry_Up_And_Buy in A TDWII Exercise: So How Did Ryan Perform in Those Pre-Quinn Collapses?   
    As many have looked to try and understand why the Falcons find themselves in the position they do today…there have been a lot of ‘culprits’ put up as sacrificial lambs as to why the Falcons are 14-22 in their last 36 and 53-63 in since the 2012 NFCCG collapse.  While the Falcons were generous enough to not snatch defeat out of the hands of victory against Green Bay this past week…the fact remains that the Falcons are a franchise in freefall. 
    A lot of that blame is being placed at the feet of Dan Quinn (amongst others)…and I would not disagree that Quinn is a primary culprit in the decay of the Falcons culture.  He needs to go and needed to go back at the conclusion of the 2019 season.  His ‘See No Evil, Hear No Evil, Speak No Evil’ approach to the Falcons performance which includes one meaningful win since November 2018 is not only frustrating to listen to week after week, but also maddening to watch permeate a fanbase that refuses to acknowledge the culpability of certain sacred cows related to this mess.
    Earlier this week, I put forth evidence that the collapse of this franchise, either measured on a week-to-week basis or a much longer period of time had roots prior to Quinn.  When you step back and see the picture as a whole…the turning point wasn’t 28-3, although that most certainly put the explanation point on cementing the legacy of the Ryan era, but rather the that 2012 NFCCG collapse.
    The ‘WHAT ELSE HE SUPPPOSED TO DOOOOOO????!!!!”ers came out in full force.  And I thought it necessary to dive deeper into Ryan’s performance in those pre-Quinn collapses.
    To refresh your memory in 5 collapses, the Falcons had built a cumulative lead of 106-54.  And Ryan was fire to those points in those respective games accumulating the following stat line:
    75 Completions
    111 Attempts
    864 Passing Yards
    67.6% Completion Rate
    7.78 YPA
    12 TD’s
    3 INT’s
    115.6 QB Rating
    In short, Ryan was a key factor in building those leads.  Much like you’d expect a franchise QB to be.  Now to…close…those……….games………………..out.  Well, after that, Ryan’s stat like was, um….not good.
    44 Completions
    78 Attempts
    487 Passing Yards
    56.4% Completion Rate
    6.24 YPA
    0 TD’s
    4 INT’s (and a fumble…don’t forget that perfectly snapped ball in the NFCCG)
    53.74 Passer Rating (which doesn’t include the fumble)
    Yes, folks…I bring you – Joey Harrington; The Sequel.  All prior to Quinn ever stepping foot in Flowery Branch.  To answer the question ‘WHAT ELSE IS HE SUPPOSED TO DOOOOOOOO????!!!!!’ my answer is…
    NOT THAT!
    But wait, there’s more…
    I also brought up the Colts game in 2015…the game Quinn was introduced to the Mr. Hyde version of Matt Ryan when the Falcons had a big lead in the second half.  How’d he do in that one?
    6/18 for 46 yards.  0 TD’s.  2 INT’s including a pick 6.  6 being the operative number there in that D’Qwell Jackson returned the INT 6 yards to put the Colts right back in that game.  I mean...a 6 yard pick-six? 🤢
    Yes, folks…the culture of choking around these parts.  It predates Dan Quinn.  And if we’re going to go with a whole new regime, I’d just assume not plant that choking seed for a third time as part of the new foundation.
    You’re welcome.
  13. Like
    TheDirtyWordII got a reaction from Dirtier Bird in A TDWII Exercise: So How Did Ryan Perform in Those Pre-Quinn Collapses?   
    As many have looked to try and understand why the Falcons find themselves in the position they do today…there have been a lot of ‘culprits’ put up as sacrificial lambs as to why the Falcons are 14-22 in their last 36 and 53-63 in since the 2012 NFCCG collapse.  While the Falcons were generous enough to not snatch defeat out of the hands of victory against Green Bay this past week…the fact remains that the Falcons are a franchise in freefall. 
    A lot of that blame is being placed at the feet of Dan Quinn (amongst others)…and I would not disagree that Quinn is a primary culprit in the decay of the Falcons culture.  He needs to go and needed to go back at the conclusion of the 2019 season.  His ‘See No Evil, Hear No Evil, Speak No Evil’ approach to the Falcons performance which includes one meaningful win since November 2018 is not only frustrating to listen to week after week, but also maddening to watch permeate a fanbase that refuses to acknowledge the culpability of certain sacred cows related to this mess.
    Earlier this week, I put forth evidence that the collapse of this franchise, either measured on a week-to-week basis or a much longer period of time had roots prior to Quinn.  When you step back and see the picture as a whole…the turning point wasn’t 28-3, although that most certainly put the explanation point on cementing the legacy of the Ryan era, but rather the that 2012 NFCCG collapse.
    The ‘WHAT ELSE HE SUPPPOSED TO DOOOOOO????!!!!”ers came out in full force.  And I thought it necessary to dive deeper into Ryan’s performance in those pre-Quinn collapses.
    To refresh your memory in 5 collapses, the Falcons had built a cumulative lead of 106-54.  And Ryan was fire to those points in those respective games accumulating the following stat line:
    75 Completions
    111 Attempts
    864 Passing Yards
    67.6% Completion Rate
    7.78 YPA
    12 TD’s
    3 INT’s
    115.6 QB Rating
    In short, Ryan was a key factor in building those leads.  Much like you’d expect a franchise QB to be.  Now to…close…those……….games………………..out.  Well, after that, Ryan’s stat like was, um….not good.
    44 Completions
    78 Attempts
    487 Passing Yards
    56.4% Completion Rate
    6.24 YPA
    0 TD’s
    4 INT’s (and a fumble…don’t forget that perfectly snapped ball in the NFCCG)
    53.74 Passer Rating (which doesn’t include the fumble)
    Yes, folks…I bring you – Joey Harrington; The Sequel.  All prior to Quinn ever stepping foot in Flowery Branch.  To answer the question ‘WHAT ELSE IS HE SUPPOSED TO DOOOOOOOO????!!!!!’ my answer is…
    NOT THAT!
    But wait, there’s more…
    I also brought up the Colts game in 2015…the game Quinn was introduced to the Mr. Hyde version of Matt Ryan when the Falcons had a big lead in the second half.  How’d he do in that one?
    6/18 for 46 yards.  0 TD’s.  2 INT’s including a pick 6.  6 being the operative number there in that D’Qwell Jackson returned the INT 6 yards to put the Colts right back in that game.  I mean...a 6 yard pick-six? 🤢
    Yes, folks…the culture of choking around these parts.  It predates Dan Quinn.  And if we’re going to go with a whole new regime, I’d just assume not plant that choking seed for a third time as part of the new foundation.
    You’re welcome.
  14. Like
    TheDirtyWordII got a reaction from ChickenBiscuit in A TDWII Exercise: So How Did Ryan Perform in Those Pre-Quinn Collapses?   
    As many have looked to try and understand why the Falcons find themselves in the position they do today…there have been a lot of ‘culprits’ put up as sacrificial lambs as to why the Falcons are 14-22 in their last 36 and 53-63 in since the 2012 NFCCG collapse.  While the Falcons were generous enough to not snatch defeat out of the hands of victory against Green Bay this past week…the fact remains that the Falcons are a franchise in freefall. 
    A lot of that blame is being placed at the feet of Dan Quinn (amongst others)…and I would not disagree that Quinn is a primary culprit in the decay of the Falcons culture.  He needs to go and needed to go back at the conclusion of the 2019 season.  His ‘See No Evil, Hear No Evil, Speak No Evil’ approach to the Falcons performance which includes one meaningful win since November 2018 is not only frustrating to listen to week after week, but also maddening to watch permeate a fanbase that refuses to acknowledge the culpability of certain sacred cows related to this mess.
    Earlier this week, I put forth evidence that the collapse of this franchise, either measured on a week-to-week basis or a much longer period of time had roots prior to Quinn.  When you step back and see the picture as a whole…the turning point wasn’t 28-3, although that most certainly put the explanation point on cementing the legacy of the Ryan era, but rather the that 2012 NFCCG collapse.
    The ‘WHAT ELSE HE SUPPPOSED TO DOOOOOO????!!!!”ers came out in full force.  And I thought it necessary to dive deeper into Ryan’s performance in those pre-Quinn collapses.
    To refresh your memory in 5 collapses, the Falcons had built a cumulative lead of 106-54.  And Ryan was fire to those points in those respective games accumulating the following stat line:
    75 Completions
    111 Attempts
    864 Passing Yards
    67.6% Completion Rate
    7.78 YPA
    12 TD’s
    3 INT’s
    115.6 QB Rating
    In short, Ryan was a key factor in building those leads.  Much like you’d expect a franchise QB to be.  Now to…close…those……….games………………..out.  Well, after that, Ryan’s stat like was, um….not good.
    44 Completions
    78 Attempts
    487 Passing Yards
    56.4% Completion Rate
    6.24 YPA
    0 TD’s
    4 INT’s (and a fumble…don’t forget that perfectly snapped ball in the NFCCG)
    53.74 Passer Rating (which doesn’t include the fumble)
    Yes, folks…I bring you – Joey Harrington; The Sequel.  All prior to Quinn ever stepping foot in Flowery Branch.  To answer the question ‘WHAT ELSE IS HE SUPPOSED TO DOOOOOOOO????!!!!!’ my answer is…
    NOT THAT!
    But wait, there’s more…
    I also brought up the Colts game in 2015…the game Quinn was introduced to the Mr. Hyde version of Matt Ryan when the Falcons had a big lead in the second half.  How’d he do in that one?
    6/18 for 46 yards.  0 TD’s.  2 INT’s including a pick 6.  6 being the operative number there in that D’Qwell Jackson returned the INT 6 yards to put the Colts right back in that game.  I mean...a 6 yard pick-six? 🤢
    Yes, folks…the culture of choking around these parts.  It predates Dan Quinn.  And if we’re going to go with a whole new regime, I’d just assume not plant that choking seed for a third time as part of the new foundation.
    You’re welcome.
  15. Like
    TheDirtyWordII got a reaction from caponine in A TDWII Exercise: So How Did Ryan Perform in Those Pre-Quinn Collapses?   
    As many have looked to try and understand why the Falcons find themselves in the position they do today…there have been a lot of ‘culprits’ put up as sacrificial lambs as to why the Falcons are 14-22 in their last 36 and 53-63 in since the 2012 NFCCG collapse.  While the Falcons were generous enough to not snatch defeat out of the hands of victory against Green Bay this past week…the fact remains that the Falcons are a franchise in freefall. 
    A lot of that blame is being placed at the feet of Dan Quinn (amongst others)…and I would not disagree that Quinn is a primary culprit in the decay of the Falcons culture.  He needs to go and needed to go back at the conclusion of the 2019 season.  His ‘See No Evil, Hear No Evil, Speak No Evil’ approach to the Falcons performance which includes one meaningful win since November 2018 is not only frustrating to listen to week after week, but also maddening to watch permeate a fanbase that refuses to acknowledge the culpability of certain sacred cows related to this mess.
    Earlier this week, I put forth evidence that the collapse of this franchise, either measured on a week-to-week basis or a much longer period of time had roots prior to Quinn.  When you step back and see the picture as a whole…the turning point wasn’t 28-3, although that most certainly put the explanation point on cementing the legacy of the Ryan era, but rather the that 2012 NFCCG collapse.
    The ‘WHAT ELSE HE SUPPPOSED TO DOOOOOO????!!!!”ers came out in full force.  And I thought it necessary to dive deeper into Ryan’s performance in those pre-Quinn collapses.
    To refresh your memory in 5 collapses, the Falcons had built a cumulative lead of 106-54.  And Ryan was fire to those points in those respective games accumulating the following stat line:
    75 Completions
    111 Attempts
    864 Passing Yards
    67.6% Completion Rate
    7.78 YPA
    12 TD’s
    3 INT’s
    115.6 QB Rating
    In short, Ryan was a key factor in building those leads.  Much like you’d expect a franchise QB to be.  Now to…close…those……….games………………..out.  Well, after that, Ryan’s stat like was, um….not good.
    44 Completions
    78 Attempts
    487 Passing Yards
    56.4% Completion Rate
    6.24 YPA
    0 TD’s
    4 INT’s (and a fumble…don’t forget that perfectly snapped ball in the NFCCG)
    53.74 Passer Rating (which doesn’t include the fumble)
    Yes, folks…I bring you – Joey Harrington; The Sequel.  All prior to Quinn ever stepping foot in Flowery Branch.  To answer the question ‘WHAT ELSE IS HE SUPPOSED TO DOOOOOOOO????!!!!!’ my answer is…
    NOT THAT!
    But wait, there’s more…
    I also brought up the Colts game in 2015…the game Quinn was introduced to the Mr. Hyde version of Matt Ryan when the Falcons had a big lead in the second half.  How’d he do in that one?
    6/18 for 46 yards.  0 TD’s.  2 INT’s including a pick 6.  6 being the operative number there in that D’Qwell Jackson returned the INT 6 yards to put the Colts right back in that game.  I mean...a 6 yard pick-six? 🤢
    Yes, folks…the culture of choking around these parts.  It predates Dan Quinn.  And if we’re going to go with a whole new regime, I’d just assume not plant that choking seed for a third time as part of the new foundation.
    You’re welcome.
  16. Like
    TheDirtyWordII got a reaction from Dirtier Bird in A TDWII Observation: Ryan, not Quinn, is the common denominator for the Falcons tendency to blow big leads...   
    Last week, CBS put the onus on Dan Quinn being the common denominator for the Falcons penchant of blowing big leads.
    Quinn is common denominator in the Falcons penchant for blowing big leads...?
    As is the case here...scapegoating never seems to find it's way to Ryan, but more discerning minds recognized that wasn't really the case.  Let's take a look at the actual evidence, shall we 😁
    In the article linked above...using the authors criteria.
    Since the beginning of the 2016 season, there have been 465 instances of an NFL team leading by at least 10 points at halftime of a regular season or postseason game. Combined, those teams have gone 422-41-2 in those games, good for a 0.910 winning percentage. Eight teams are undefeated with double-digit halftime leads, but only one has more than three losses. 
    So in 4+ seasons, 32 NFL teams lost 41 times...an average of little more than 1 time.  The Falcons though...
    Certainly, we all remember the 2012/2013 NFCCG.  The Falcons were up 17-0 and then 24-14 at halftime....we know what happened there.  But what people tend to forget is that the week before, the Falcons had a 20-0 lead only to blow that.  Thankfully, Matt Bryant staved off franchise choking embarrassment with a 49 yard FG (for a week).
    But the next season...
    Falcons/Packers; 21-22 - December 8, 2013 - staked to a 21-10 halftime lead, the Falcons can't hold on as they go scoreless in the second half.
    ...then the following season, we were treated to this.
    Falcons/Lions; 21-22 - October 26, 2014 - 11 point lead?  Pffft...we can blow more than that.  The 'Wembley' game saw the Falcons up 21-0 at halftime only to go scoreless in the second half.
    So if the author is taking into account a period of 4+ NFL seasons, I give you 3 such instances in a span of 21 months.  But that's not all...
    The author likely doesn't account for games in which teams had a 10+ point lead AFTER halftime.  But you would think the winning percentage would be in the same neighborhood, you know, since there would be less time remaining in such a game.
    Falcons/Dolphins; 23-27 - September 22, 2013 - the 3rd game of the 2013 regular season, the choke of the NFCCG still fresh in everyone's minds, Matt Ryan throws a TD to Levine Toilolo to put the Falcons up 20-10 with 12:40 left go in in the 3rd quarter.  The Falcons go onto score only one more FG.
    Falcons/Giants; 20-30 - October 5, 2014 - with 5:37 left in the 3rd quarter, Antone Smith takes a Matt Ryan pass 76 yards to the house and the Falcons take a 20-10 lead at the Meadowlands.  Arithmatic can tell you how many points we scored the rest of the way.
    So 5 games...in less than a 2 year period.
    I'll throw this one in as a bonus because y'all will probably put this on Quinn, but...
    Falcons/Colts; 21-24 - November 22, 2015 - Leonard Hankerson catches a 3 yard TD from Ryan with 9:38 left in the 3rd quarter to put the Falcons up 21-7.  But from that point forward...you guessed it.  Say it with me now - the Falcons went scoreless to go down yet again.  But that one was on Quinn I'm sure.
    But if we do the math, that's 132:55...the equivalent of two plus games where Ryan led offenses put up a total of 3 points.  3 POINTS!!!!!  But it's all on DQ.  DQ has his failings...but I'll enjoy watching the defense of a false idol here...
  17. Like
    TheDirtyWordII got a reaction from ShadyRef in A TDWII Observation: Ryan, not Quinn, is the common denominator for the Falcons tendency to blow big leads...   
    Taking my example a step further...if the Falcons go onto lose 24-21...all the vitriol and condemnation comes down on the defense around these parts, or probably more specifically - anyone but Ryan, for losing that lead.
    But Ryan and the offense scored no additional points as well.  They are equally culpable for the loss.  

    Yet when it comes time for the axe to fall, Ryan sits on top the Falcons food chain...untouched, while everyone else is left to scramble for their jobs. 

    Everyone around here nods in agreement when it comes to being Quinn’s fault, Sark’s fault, Koetter’s fault, Manuel’s fault, the defenses fault, the O-Lines fault.
    But come down on the on-field CEO of the Falcons and it’s highest paid employee?
    WHAT ELSE IS HE SUPPOSED TO DOOOOOOOOO?????!!!!!
  18. Like
    TheDirtyWordII reacted to treboyplay in A TDWII Observation: Ryan, not Quinn, is the common denominator for the Falcons tendency to blow big leads...   
    See this comment is what confuses me and a lot of people who like I feel. I never said ALL of the blame was on him. But soon as I say he played his part in the failures, here goes someone saying “quit putting ALL the blame on him”. Hahahaha It’s like if anything is said about Matt Ryan all of sudden we’re blaming him for everything. Or someone will say we hate Matt Ryan. I don’t hate Matt Ryan or Blame him for everything. **** I own 2 Matt Ryan jerseys. But I also have to be honest and say #2 has had bad moments and has been a part of all these epic collapses. It is what it is. 
  19. Like
    TheDirtyWordII got a reaction from treboyplay in A TDWII Observation: Ryan, not Quinn, is the common denominator for the Falcons tendency to blow big leads...   
    Taking my example a step further...if the Falcons go onto lose 24-21...all the vitriol and condemnation comes down on the defense around these parts, or probably more specifically - anyone but Ryan, for losing that lead.
    But Ryan and the offense scored no additional points as well.  They are equally culpable for the loss.  

    Yet when it comes time for the axe to fall, Ryan sits on top the Falcons food chain...untouched, while everyone else is left to scramble for their jobs. 

    Everyone around here nods in agreement when it comes to being Quinn’s fault, Sark’s fault, Koetter’s fault, Manuel’s fault, the defenses fault, the O-Lines fault.
    But come down on the on-field CEO of the Falcons and it’s highest paid employee?
    WHAT ELSE IS HE SUPPOSED TO DOOOOOOOOO?????!!!!!
  20. Like
    TheDirtyWordII got a reaction from JKH5785 in A TDWII Observation: Ryan, not Quinn, is the common denominator for the Falcons tendency to blow big leads...   
    Taking my example a step further...if the Falcons go onto lose 24-21...all the vitriol and condemnation comes down on the defense around these parts, or probably more specifically - anyone but Ryan, for losing that lead.
    But Ryan and the offense scored no additional points as well.  They are equally culpable for the loss.  

    Yet when it comes time for the axe to fall, Ryan sits on top the Falcons food chain...untouched, while everyone else is left to scramble for their jobs. 

    Everyone around here nods in agreement when it comes to being Quinn’s fault, Sark’s fault, Koetter’s fault, Manuel’s fault, the defenses fault, the O-Lines fault.
    But come down on the on-field CEO of the Falcons and it’s highest paid employee?
    WHAT ELSE IS HE SUPPOSED TO DOOOOOOOOO?????!!!!!
  21. Like
    TheDirtyWordII got a reaction from treboyplay in A TDWII Observation: Ryan, not Quinn, is the common denominator for the Falcons tendency to blow big leads...   
    That type of rationale absolves the most important and relevant player on the Falcons - the franchise QB.  It doesn’t matter who he did or didn’t have the pleasure of playing for/with.  It matters that at the end of the day, he’s 53-63 since the NFCCG of 2012.
    Those ‘going to be’ things...unfortunately, that ain’t reality as much as we all wish it were.  Winning matters.  How things went down matter.  But he wasn’t SB MVP...we didn’t hold up a Lombardi Trophy.  Imagine being able to tell a Saints fan, we had a Lombardi Trophy while they only had a Lombounty Trophy.  It would have been sublime.  Except we didn’t lose on a technicality...we lost.  Blame it on whomever you’d like...but the stink stuck to everyone involved.  Ryan included.
  22. Like
    TheDirtyWordII reacted to HEIST in What team would be a good fit for Matt Ryan?   
    Just gotta find him a team with a good running game, safety blanket TE, 3 good receivers, a kickass OL, excellent coaching and a top level defense.
  23. Like
    TheDirtyWordII got a reaction from Osiruz in A TDWII Observation: Ryan, not Quinn, is the common denominator for the Falcons tendency to blow big leads...   
    Last week, CBS put the onus on Dan Quinn being the common denominator for the Falcons penchant of blowing big leads.
    Quinn is common denominator in the Falcons penchant for blowing big leads...?
    As is the case here...scapegoating never seems to find it's way to Ryan, but more discerning minds recognized that wasn't really the case.  Let's take a look at the actual evidence, shall we 😁
    In the article linked above...using the authors criteria.
    Since the beginning of the 2016 season, there have been 465 instances of an NFL team leading by at least 10 points at halftime of a regular season or postseason game. Combined, those teams have gone 422-41-2 in those games, good for a 0.910 winning percentage. Eight teams are undefeated with double-digit halftime leads, but only one has more than three losses. 
    So in 4+ seasons, 32 NFL teams lost 41 times...an average of little more than 1 time.  The Falcons though...
    Certainly, we all remember the 2012/2013 NFCCG.  The Falcons were up 17-0 and then 24-14 at halftime....we know what happened there.  But what people tend to forget is that the week before, the Falcons had a 20-0 lead only to blow that.  Thankfully, Matt Bryant staved off franchise choking embarrassment with a 49 yard FG (for a week).
    But the next season...
    Falcons/Packers; 21-22 - December 8, 2013 - staked to a 21-10 halftime lead, the Falcons can't hold on as they go scoreless in the second half.
    ...then the following season, we were treated to this.
    Falcons/Lions; 21-22 - October 26, 2014 - 11 point lead?  Pffft...we can blow more than that.  The 'Wembley' game saw the Falcons up 21-0 at halftime only to go scoreless in the second half.
    So if the author is taking into account a period of 4+ NFL seasons, I give you 3 such instances in a span of 21 months.  But that's not all...
    The author likely doesn't account for games in which teams had a 10+ point lead AFTER halftime.  But you would think the winning percentage would be in the same neighborhood, you know, since there would be less time remaining in such a game.
    Falcons/Dolphins; 23-27 - September 22, 2013 - the 3rd game of the 2013 regular season, the choke of the NFCCG still fresh in everyone's minds, Matt Ryan throws a TD to Levine Toilolo to put the Falcons up 20-10 with 12:40 left go in in the 3rd quarter.  The Falcons go onto score only one more FG.
    Falcons/Giants; 20-30 - October 5, 2014 - with 5:37 left in the 3rd quarter, Antone Smith takes a Matt Ryan pass 76 yards to the house and the Falcons take a 20-10 lead at the Meadowlands.  Arithmatic can tell you how many points we scored the rest of the way.
    So 5 games...in less than a 2 year period.
    I'll throw this one in as a bonus because y'all will probably put this on Quinn, but...
    Falcons/Colts; 21-24 - November 22, 2015 - Leonard Hankerson catches a 3 yard TD from Ryan with 9:38 left in the 3rd quarter to put the Falcons up 21-7.  But from that point forward...you guessed it.  Say it with me now - the Falcons went scoreless to go down yet again.  But that one was on Quinn I'm sure.
    But if we do the math, that's 132:55...the equivalent of two plus games where Ryan led offenses put up a total of 3 points.  3 POINTS!!!!!  But it's all on DQ.  DQ has his failings...but I'll enjoy watching the defense of a false idol here...
  24. Like
    TheDirtyWordII got a reaction from Bunchy Carter in A TDWII Observation: Ryan, not Quinn, is the common denominator for the Falcons tendency to blow big leads...   
    Last week, CBS put the onus on Dan Quinn being the common denominator for the Falcons penchant of blowing big leads.
    Quinn is common denominator in the Falcons penchant for blowing big leads...?
    As is the case here...scapegoating never seems to find it's way to Ryan, but more discerning minds recognized that wasn't really the case.  Let's take a look at the actual evidence, shall we 😁
    In the article linked above...using the authors criteria.
    Since the beginning of the 2016 season, there have been 465 instances of an NFL team leading by at least 10 points at halftime of a regular season or postseason game. Combined, those teams have gone 422-41-2 in those games, good for a 0.910 winning percentage. Eight teams are undefeated with double-digit halftime leads, but only one has more than three losses. 
    So in 4+ seasons, 32 NFL teams lost 41 times...an average of little more than 1 time.  The Falcons though...
    Certainly, we all remember the 2012/2013 NFCCG.  The Falcons were up 17-0 and then 24-14 at halftime....we know what happened there.  But what people tend to forget is that the week before, the Falcons had a 20-0 lead only to blow that.  Thankfully, Matt Bryant staved off franchise choking embarrassment with a 49 yard FG (for a week).
    But the next season...
    Falcons/Packers; 21-22 - December 8, 2013 - staked to a 21-10 halftime lead, the Falcons can't hold on as they go scoreless in the second half.
    ...then the following season, we were treated to this.
    Falcons/Lions; 21-22 - October 26, 2014 - 11 point lead?  Pffft...we can blow more than that.  The 'Wembley' game saw the Falcons up 21-0 at halftime only to go scoreless in the second half.
    So if the author is taking into account a period of 4+ NFL seasons, I give you 3 such instances in a span of 21 months.  But that's not all...
    The author likely doesn't account for games in which teams had a 10+ point lead AFTER halftime.  But you would think the winning percentage would be in the same neighborhood, you know, since there would be less time remaining in such a game.
    Falcons/Dolphins; 23-27 - September 22, 2013 - the 3rd game of the 2013 regular season, the choke of the NFCCG still fresh in everyone's minds, Matt Ryan throws a TD to Levine Toilolo to put the Falcons up 20-10 with 12:40 left go in in the 3rd quarter.  The Falcons go onto score only one more FG.
    Falcons/Giants; 20-30 - October 5, 2014 - with 5:37 left in the 3rd quarter, Antone Smith takes a Matt Ryan pass 76 yards to the house and the Falcons take a 20-10 lead at the Meadowlands.  Arithmatic can tell you how many points we scored the rest of the way.
    So 5 games...in less than a 2 year period.
    I'll throw this one in as a bonus because y'all will probably put this on Quinn, but...
    Falcons/Colts; 21-24 - November 22, 2015 - Leonard Hankerson catches a 3 yard TD from Ryan with 9:38 left in the 3rd quarter to put the Falcons up 21-7.  But from that point forward...you guessed it.  Say it with me now - the Falcons went scoreless to go down yet again.  But that one was on Quinn I'm sure.
    But if we do the math, that's 132:55...the equivalent of two plus games where Ryan led offenses put up a total of 3 points.  3 POINTS!!!!!  But it's all on DQ.  DQ has his failings...but I'll enjoy watching the defense of a false idol here...
  25. Like
    TheDirtyWordII got a reaction from sappy1 in A TDWII Observation: Ryan, not Quinn, is the common denominator for the Falcons tendency to blow big leads...   
    I know you were looking for him.  Did you see the clinic he put on?  Wow...now that’s QB play!
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