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direwolf

Pure Football
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Everything posted by direwolf

  1. Good for them - sounds like a group of people who will make the most of the opportunity. Wish them the best!
  2. My parents are still there, within walking distance of the Tavern. Still know the area pretty well, though a lot has changed/grown since I left.
  3. Yep, Dunwoody Tavern for the win. Is it even still there? I don't get to that part of town very often. I've met a few folks in person - Capologist, Cooter, Gazoo, a few others.
  4. What's up, Rev? I'm still around. I remember when I started on the boards, back in 2002 or so. Long freaking time ago! Mostly here for articles these days - this remains a pretty good clearinghouse for Falcons news.
  5. Wait a sec... did we just have a reasonable and rational exchange of ideas that didn't agree without sniping at each other? Is that allowed? 🙂
  6. If Pees actually is planning to use him in that Swiss Army Knife role and move him around the defense, to me that actually speaks very well of Oliver. A player would need to be able to understand assignments and responsibilities from all over the defense to handle that kind of role, which takes serious football smarts. It also suggests that Pees thinks he can find favorable matchups with Oliver's skillset. Just a thought...
  7. Maybe he'll actually protect them for a change with good play calling that doesn't hang them out to dry!
  8. Love this. Really cool to get something like that going. Willing to bet that the league offers him a position doing the same thing after he retires.
  9. Winston takes it a step farther by not caring if he throws INTs that BECOME TDs...
  10. You could be right. I'm (probably naively) hoping for a situation where we go straight from great QB to great QB. I'm also hoping to win the lottery.
  11. I'm not "mad" at anyone - don't know any of these people personally. But, at the risk of starting a longer conversation than intended (or needed), not clear on how Atlanta "struck first". Julio got a mega contract and then decided it wasn't good enough and so held out and got another contract with a massive amount of guaranteed money. If reports indicating that he didn't like the deal are accurate, he shouldn't have signed it - that's on him. Not like the Falcons were going one-sided on it; that contract set up a big chunk of the nasty cap situation we're in right now, so they agreed to feel some pain in order to give him more money. The team has let him skip practice, taken him off the field for stretches at a time to rest even when he was needed, and generally treated him about as well as they could based on the information available. If he's got bad blood with someone specifically, that doesn't necessarily mean the "team" did anything.
  12. I'd say Ryan over Julio, but honestly no one is guaranteed their position. Ryan says it best - you don't own the locker, you rent, and the rent is due every Sunday. I wish Blank had never said that "Falcon for life" thing about anyone. What's likely to happen is he'll leave and there will be some hurt feelings and then in a few years, once he's retired, he and Blank will make up and they'll hang his jersey in the rafters. As to why he wants out, I think he probably doesn't feel like going through another rebuild (no matter what others call it, we're breaking in an entirely new regime following two brutal seasons). If he's going to learn a new system, might as well be with a team on the cusp. I can understand that. Don't like the approach, but also don't care what someone I don't know thinks. I just keep rooting for the logo.
  13. Yeah, didn’t think that one through. It’s the off-season post-draft.
  14. None taken. Figured you wouldn’t - you made your stance clear. I just thought it was interesting and was a way to think about something other than work stuff! 😂
  15. Have to correct one thing - there is a locational element to it as well. The position of the sun when playing in Miami combined with forcing away teams to wear dark jerseys. The field in Pittsburgh being notoriously bad and benefiting the team with experience dealing with it. But the physical elements are slowly being mitigated - artificial turf that is uniformly installed helps negate field issues. Improved cooling technology mitigates the Miami sun. In the long run, the emotional part may be the only part left! But still a factor!
  16. Interesting. But being "better" is not an absolute thing or else there would never be upsets. So there must be variable factors that play into whether team "A" or team "B" is "better" on game day, such as overall player skill (subjective in and of itself, but at least somewhat observable), relative performance levels (as in, players don't play at exactly the same level every time they play - "Ryan was 'off' today!"), player error (Devonta Freeman whiffing that blitz pickup), outside interference (the refs blowing the call that led substantively to the Rams making the Super Bowl over the Saints), etc. Each factor plays a role and the weight of that role fluctuates so wildly that gambling is a very lucrative industry for bookies because people get it wrong the majority of the time. The thing about "home field advantage" is that it's not objectively about location - rather, it's about emotion. The innate desire to "defend one's territory" (humans are territorial pack/tribal animals by nature), the roar of the crowd causing false starts and other performance errors by the visiting team, etc. Those are very real and quantifiable things in lots of areas in and out of sports - shoot, the board game Risk even codifies it by giving bonuses to defending armies against attackers. Saying home field advantage isn't real is effectively diminishing the impact of emotion on the game. Asserting that if home field advantage was real, every team would be 8-8 is based on one of two assumptions: either that home field advantage is the ONLY factor or that it is one of many, but is an absolute in and of itself (which would be represented statistically by home teams having a 100% win rate but by varying point differentials as determined by the other, relative factors). Neither are verifiably true. There are cases where a team that has lost its quarterback and is playing a first-time starter (objectively "worse") against a team that was favored to beat them even WITH their starter and still won. I would suggest that home field advantage is one of many, MANY factors, but every bit as real and relative as the rest of them. When a crowd in Seattle is registering on the Richter Scale and the opposition false starts half a dozen times, that creates a material impact on the outcome. When the Falcons' crowd is late to the game and screwing around in the concourse after the game resumes from halftime and the opposition has no trouble hearing the snap count or playcall, that also has a material impact (though not as noticeable on the stat sheet). It's relative. Interestingly, home teams finished below .500 for the first time in NFL history this past season (127-128-1) - when raucous crowds were not allowed in the buildings. Almost as if a factor that HAD been impacting results in a minor, but statistically significant way was removed, huh? Also interestingly, the home team winning % has been declining in recent years - almost like teams are figuring out ways (like silent snap counts) to mitigate the impact of a factor that weighed against them. Why would they work so hard to mitigate something that doesn't actually exist? You don't believe that home field advantage exists and are absolutely closed to evidence to the contrary - rock on, more power to you. But a LOT of people have gotten very rich believing something else and using the evidence to back it up. Sorry for the long-winded post, but this was interesting and I've got a nasty case of the "Friday afternoon f--k its" at work.
  17. Yeah, that was the point I was trying to make. I wish that they would add a squat test for linemen to the combine in addition to bench reps.
  18. Bench is nice, but anchoring involves a lot of lower body strength, too. Realistically, as far as I know he could be an absolute beast already and any speculation otherwise is rubbish. Either way, I trust our staff to get him where he needs to be.
  19. 30 ppg is a high bar - two teams from last year got to that range. League average last year was 24.3 (we were just north of that and ranked 16th despite all our issues). 27 ppg would have been top ten last year. I would think we'd be okay with 27 ppg on average if the defense can be even middle of the road (I think it'll take a season or two to start thinking about the defense being a strength assuming we have steady improvement at all). Remember that despite the horrible record, our point differential was very slight due to all the blown leads and late collapses.
  20. OP mentioned improving functional strength, which is the name of the game. An NFL strength program should get him where he needs to be and if his technique is sound, he'll be fine from a size standpoint.
  21. Best part for me was that every pick made sense and there weren't any where people were just totally baffled. Thinking Lamar Holmes here - everyone was just dumbfounded when we picked him in the third. None of that this time. I know that I'm no expert and I don't follow draft stuff nearly as closely as many, but the fact that even a dabbler like I am could feel confident about the picks and know exactly how they'll fit in made for SUCH a nice change from previous years. Add in that I feel like we're actually building depth for a change and it gets better. Dimitroff definitely had his good picks, including some downright superb ones, but his philosophy left us dangerously thin at most positions as the last few years have revealed. I certainly wish him well and am grateful for a run of success that was unprecedented in team history (which says a lot, sadly), but I'm thrilled for new leadership and perspective.
  22. Seriously, if we get another Todd McClure out of him, we'll be in great shape. Mud Duck was a **** of a player and leader.
  23. No doubt higher than Koetter’s playcalling, which plays in a LOT to how offensive linemen perform.
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