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Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/29/2020 in Posts

  1. All offseason we have had to deal with the QB@4 crowd being belligerent, antagonistic, patronizing and aggressive to anyone who dared suggest we weren't taking a QB at 4 no matter any of the real world reasoning and logistics behind it. Some of you were downright brutal this offseason making it one of the worst offseasons I can remember. TATF was a joke, full of trolls bashing on Matt at every chance they got and pushing their conspiracy theories as to why person x said thing y which SURELY means QB at 4. A lot of us told you the entire time you were wrong, and it wasn't a QB at 4. You laughed at us. You mocked us. You got oddly aggressive with us. You called us Matt Ryan "nuthuggers" I believe was the term... I just gotta say it... Jokes on you. Told ya.
    120 points
  2. Well I'm a grandfather. I came on this board when she was a toddler, she made me a grandpa this year. I'm excited.
    79 points
  3. 1) You draft a QB when your current QB is bad...ours isn’t. 2) You draft a QB when your QB is ending his career...ours isn’t. 3) You draft a QB so you can take advantage of the rookie wage scale and save a ton of money for five years and build around him...we are still paying Ryan so that isn’t a thing, and we have no money to surround that person with talent. 4) The flawed logic of “we won’t be drafting this high in a long time we we have to take our QB of the future”. This is wrong for two reasons. QBs taken in the top five have been less successful then the rest of the fist round, and that includes trade ups so it isn’t always bad teams, second, and most importantly, if we are going to be drafting later the next few years, that means we are winning...with Matt Ryan...so we don’t need a QB right now. 5) Our offense will look night and day better once DK is gone. He made everyone on offense, including Ryan, look worse than they are. 6) We gave up 44 points today, had a fluke INT and they took a knee on our side of the field, and some think QB is the problem. It blows my mind that Jets fans fight for Sam Darnold who has accomplished nothing and this fan base is so blind they want to flush Ryan down the toilet. I am at the point where I almost want it to happen so I can call every person on here out when the grass isn’t greener and they realize Ryan is the best QB this franchise has ever had and for some reason people did nothing but **** on him his whole career, mainly because they have no clue what they are talking about.
    66 points
  4. https://twitter.com/FalconsKingdom/status/1358829003180769286 Oh
    58 points
  5. First of all, as a Falcons fan since 1966 and having suffered through the Rankin Smith ownership tenure, I am forever grateful to Arthur Blank for what he has done for this city and this franchise. He makes mistakes like we all do but he is still one of the very best owners, not just in the NFL, but in all of pro sports. Mr Blank does one thing exceptionally well. When he decides he wants someone in his organization, he does whatever has to be done and gets the person he wants. He is not cheap. You never hear him complain publicly about money or having to pay big contracts even if those contracts were ill-advised. It may not always turn out to be the best decision, but give the man credit where credit is due... he goes after who and what he wants and gets it. I truly appreciate him as an owner. We are fortunate to have him.
    56 points
  6. I don’t think anyone disagrees with you on if “an ELITE qb is available at 4...then take him.” The difference is you seem to be convinced all the QB’s are elite. Others are not
    55 points
  7. That's a dumb way to judge QBs. The QB is 1 guy out of 53.
    55 points
  8. I'm about to change your password
    51 points
  9. We cant run the ball, Ryan has no "get out of jail free" receiver, we only get a good pass rush when we blitz, the secondary is weak. It doesnt look like we have a QB problem, he got us a lead. The run game and defense holds the lead. The defense need the run game and overall clock management. I dont think we have clock management plays.
    51 points
  10. 51 points
  11. Falcons and Hooker. Where have I heard this before???
    50 points
  12. If anyone moves a QB up their rankings because of a 40 time they're evaluating the wrong position.
    50 points
  13. Something about a Falcons DB and a Hooker doesn’t sit well with me...
    49 points
  14. 🤪😀Of all places, I saw this in the middle of a political thread on Facebook. Suck it Saints.
    49 points
  15. The comment from the original tweet is funny.
    48 points
  16. Williamb

    RISEN UP!!!!!!!

    Have a happy and blessed Easter everyone!!!!!!
    47 points
  17. Falcons Fam Please pray really hard for my Grandpa. He's in the hospital on a ventilator. He was having sepsis symptoms this morning. He's my best friend in the world. Thank you. we are a brotherhood.
    47 points
  18. Trent Dilfer and Brad Johnson were not better QBs than Dan Marino and Dan Fouts.
    47 points
  19. JDaveG

    Louis Riddick

    They like Lance a lot? But what about Queen Guinevere? I’ll show myself out.
    45 points
  20. Man, just no words. He dealt with a lot in life and struggled with his own personal demons, but by all accounts was a loyal and caring Brother. I just wanted to say Rest Easy to one of my all time faves https://vm.tiktok.com/ZMea33CXr/
    45 points
  21. Geneaut

    Koo

    45 points
  22. Good afternoon beautiful people. It's been too long. I've been meaning to do one of these for the longest buuttt... you know, 2020 and all. But the Falcons left me in a good mood Sunday so here we go. Let me just start off by saying, the first five games or so -- and I don't want to be too hyperbolic about this, but this was some of the sh**iest defense I have ever seen in my life. I don't wanna say they were the worst defense I had ever seen, but I can't think of too many worse off-hand. And the defensive play calling (whoever was doing it) was atrocious. It was a total repeat of last season's first quarter where everyone was in the wrong position. We were blitzing when we should have been playing coverage. We were playing coverage when we should have been blitzing. There was no anticipation as to what the offense was doing. For all the mess Dirk takes around here for his play calling, the defensive play calling was worse. I'm not totally sure if Jeff has been completely handed the keys or if it's another one of those combinations like last year where Jeff calls early downs and Raheem calls the 3rd down stuff, but it's been working. It's been working like a mother******. The thing I think that has really stood out lately has been the 3rd down package. We've really mixed it up nicely with this fire zone stuff that we'll roll out from time to time to keep offenses off balance. There are a couple of calls I want to look at -- this might be the only one I get to, so bear with me -- but this first one from the opening quarter was a beauty. 3rd and 3 - Raiders are close to mid-field. Now usually, and predictably, we usually just go man right here, which is what it looks exactly what the Raiders were expecting. Hence the bunch formation. To the bottom of the screen we got a vertical that's not really part of the read. He's just there to clear out the underneath coverage to hopefully find some space for the drag route coming from the top. To the top is another vertical from the #1 receiver designed to do the same thing; clear out the underneath coverage for Renfro on that speed out. It's a very well designed play, actually. Should be money on 3rd and 3. This is what we answer with -- Buck Zone 3 out of Nickel. Usually we show a double-A Gap pressure look with both linebacker's mugging the line of scrimmage, but here, and because of the formation, plus down and distance, Deion has to play off the LOS. We got a five-man pressure. Foye is coming on the blitz where he's going to fake up the middle then run a twist all the way around to the C-Gap. Coverage-wise we're in our customary 3-deep shell. Because of the loss of Foye, we only have one hook defender, Deion. Two curl-flat players in Neal and the Nickel corner, two corners playing deep 1/3's and of course the deep safety. Now this play should work for a first down, but it's the lights out execution that gets us off the field. This right here is what I LOVE about defense. It is the essence of football -- communication and execution. Simple stuff. Look at Deion and Neal's eyes. Right on their assignments. They're not trying to do the next man's job. Neal ain't jumping up to take #15, even though his initial steps take him right to the marker, because that's Deion's man. Instead, he plays his assignment. We're not spot-dropping here, we're reading patterns, so Neal is playing that curl area first and letting the throw take him to the flat. He's fading with #11 on the vertical route, while keeping eyes on Renfro. Now in a spot-drop concept, the hook defender (Deion) has a 10-12 yard drop with 1-2 yards wide of the hashmark, but again, here's we're reading patterns. That's the only way this type of zone blitz works. We're letting our guys be athletes. Deion has the first receiver that comes inside. Renfro throws an obligatory chip and stumbles, while #15 runs the drag right to Deion's zone. To the bottom of the screen, you got the Nickel, who is the other curl/flat defender, getting a jam on the receiver. This is key when you're curl flat... you never let a receiver run up the seam untouched. You get hands on him and physically displace him on his route to help out the safety. Meanwhile, Foye is looping while the end to his side takes an inside move, clearing the way. Now this is the part I'm really in love with. These two made the play -- Deion jumps the drag. Most linebackers just don't have the mobility to run with a receiver there, but Deion actually cuts in front of that route. And Neal plays this perfect. He knows the situation, he knows what the offense needs, and he knows exactly where Carr wants to go... The ball isn't even out and Neal has already gotten his foot into the ground and is driving downhill. Thing-of-beauty... Neal knows he's got help behind him. Passes #1 to the corner, takes the second man through the zone. Exactly the way it's drawn up and a beautiful hit. And step over him like a piece of garbage for good measure... punk. This is football right here. This is what we've been missing. Details. Fundamentals. You don't have to have some exotic scheme or all-pro's at every position if you can get your guys playing clean and on the same page.
    45 points
  23. Sooo.. if you want to know about our new O-line coach's philosophy, check this out. He is giving a clinic on the wide zone scheme, which is what Coach Smith ran in TN. Former NFL lineman who has been coaching O-lines for almost 15+ years. This could be a great hire!
    44 points
  24. 43 points
  25. Love the guy.... But MJ over Lebron all day.
    43 points
  26. Fontenot was the guy I wanted as soon as the GM position opened up. Aints rosters have always had depth and have been well rounded. From the pro personnel side it’s clear to see that Fontenot knows what he’s doing. Bringing in quality guys like Patterson, Harmon, Erik Harris, Mingo, Moreau, etc...not to bash Dimitroff and Quinn, but these are pieces we wouldn’t have seen here. A lot of people here didn’t think he’d do well in the draft aspect because “that was all Mickey Loomis”, but it’s obvious that Fontenot knows how to work a draft board; trading down when needed, finding boom picks and value picks. Now looking at the UDFA signings and again it’s clear that we are bringing in intriguing players that will push the competition in house. Arthur Smith was a guy that I didn’t want lol. However, I’ve grown to trust that this guy is no frills and all business. He and Terry seem to be on the same page with a clear vision in mind. They have worked this off-season masterfully together so far. We won’t truly know the full extent of his coaching abilities until players get on field, but all signs point towards a positive outcome considering the synergy in the FO right now. High five, fist bump, daps all around. Great job, guys!
    42 points
  27. If TD would go QB, TF shouldn't go QB. Next!
    42 points
  28. Coach Smith, please do not listen to a dam thing this fan base has to say. Mods, please deliver
    40 points
  29. This is not intended to be a final bash Dirk post, although there will be some I'm sure. This is more to show different tendencies over their two years on their respective teams. My goal with this is to try to predict what kind of performance we can expect from our offense next year. I'm also not going to compare basic stats because that is easy info to find and has likely already been done. First, Let's Compare Personnel. I will use PFF Grades to keep this simple as the base of "who is better or worse", I know it isn't the end all be all but very few here I'm sure have watched a ton of snaps of Tennessee's Left Guard, so I'm just taking out any fan bias as well. From there try to dig into how the starters changed those years vs previous and play calling tendencies. 2020 PFF Grades QB Ryan: 83.1 Tannehill: 90.6 RB Smith: 59.0 Henry: 91.8 WR Jones: 86.3 Ridley: 84.9 Brown: 90.4 Davis: 85.3 TE Smith: 74.0 Hurst: 58.9 LT Matthews: 75.5 Lewan: 61.8 LG Carpenter: 56.1 Saffold: 72.8 C Mack: 65.7 Jones: 78.6 RG Lindstrom: 77.2 Davis: 71.1 RT McGary: 64.1 Kelly: 65.9 Couple comments. I don't think Tannehill is better than Ryan, I don't think TEN's WR core is better than ATL's, but I do believe Smith had them playing better than Dirk did in ATL. Quarterbacks QB - Ryan had his two lowest graded seasons of the last 8 years under Dirk, while Tannehill had by far his best two seasons under Smith. Here are their grades the last 8 years (when Tannehill entered the league) Year - Ryan | Tannehill 2020 - 83.1 | 90.6 2019 - 76.0 | 90.2 2018 - 84.3 | 45.3 2017 - 88.3 | 74.2 2016 - 92.2 | 68.0 2015 - 80.9 | 75.6 2014 - 84.8 | 75.6 2013 - 76.6 | 80.4 2012 - 88.2 | 68.4 Smith took a very average to below average QB and had him playing at an elite level. This alone is extremely encouraging. I still don't think Tannehill got the recognition he deserved on how well he was playing just because 1) he was always mediocre and 2) Henry got all the love. So what are some key things that changed for both QBs? Play Action In 2020 Tannehill ran the highest % of pass plays out of play action, however had the worst completion % difference in the league vs plays with no play actions. Ryan was 22nd in play action rate, but was 3rd in completion % vs plays with no play action. AKA Tannehill was 7.9% worse on play action passes vs non, Ryan was 6.3% high completion rate vs non. Year - Ryan | Tannehill 2020 - 25.8% | 36.4% 2019 - 20.6% | 29.9% 2018 - 26.9% | 25.5% 2017 - 22.8% | N/A 2016 - 27.6% | 21.8% Ryan's 27.6% in 2016 was number one in the league, 27.6% would put you at 18th in the league in 2020. Times are changing and further proof Dirk wasn't keeping up. Pre-Snap Motion (Last Two Years) ATL - 40% (17th) TEN - 56% (3rd)...62% in quarters 1-3 which was 2nd in the league QB Rushing TDs Tannehill before Smith: 6 TDs in 6 seasons, 1 per year Tannehill with Smith: 12 TDs in 2 seasons, 6 per year Ryan's career 12 TDs in 13 seasons, ~1 per year % of Throws < 2.5 Seconds Ryan - 44.1% (30th) Tannehill - 52.7% (14th) % of Dropbacks Under Pressure Ryan - 34.1% Tannehill - 31.1% Personnel Groupings - Multiple Tight End Set Usage (2020) Pass Plays ATL - 17% (18th) TEN - 42% (3rd only to CLE & MIN) Run Plays ATL - 33% (23rd) TEN - 54% (3rd only to CLE & NYG) Top 5 Personnel Sets In Order of Use vs Success Rate (2020) ATL 1-1 - 61% | 47% 1-2 - 15% | 54% 2-1 - 12% | 45% 2-2 - 6% | 46% 1-3 - 3% | 38% TEN 1-1 - 40% | 53% 1-2 - 33% | 53% 2-1 - 11% | 56% 1-3 - 9% | 50% 2-2 - 5% | 54% Total Success Rate ATL - 47% (25th) TEN - 53% (4th behind KC, BUF & GB) Red Zone Efficiency (2020) ATL - 53% (26th) TEN - 74% (2nd) Red Zone Efficiency (2019) ATL - 52% (25th) TEN - 77% (1st) Field Goal Attempts per Game (This is a Bad Thing) ATL - 2.5 (2nd) TEN - 1.4 (31st) Average Yards to Go on 2nd Down ATL - 7.5 (11th) TEN - 7 (1st) Under Center Snaps (Run vs Pass) ATL - 55% to 45% TEN - 70% to 30% Dirk actually outbalanced Smith here. Shotgun however...... Shotgun Snaps (Run vs Pass) ATL - 22% to 78% (4th highest) TEN - 33% to 67% (9th highest) Passing Breakdown by Position (2020) RB | TE | WR Target Rate ATL - 17% | 17% | 66% TEN - 12% | 29% | 58% Success Rate ATL - 43% | 50% | 56% TEN - 38% | 57% | 59% Yards per Attempt ATL - 4.7 | 6.4 | 8.7 TEN - 4.1 | 7.1 | 9.5 No Huddle Rate ATL - 7.98% (15th) TEN - 16.51% (3rd) There are a lot of other random stats I am sure I could find, but I am already getting tired and don't feel like digging more. I for one am very excited about the hire the more I dove into these numbers...and maybe even more excited that Dirk won't be back.
    40 points
  30. Wow, I had no idea these boards were still up and running. I was a Mod here for over a decade. Any old timers here?
    39 points
  31. Kyle Pitts...ftw
    39 points
  32. Hey, don't lump us all together. Some of us aren't fans of either.
    39 points
  33. "Last year's secondary was terrible." "They didn't keep last year's players around, so their secondary will be terrible." Not guaranteeing the secondary will be better, but it's not like the argument above is flawless in its logic.
    38 points
  34. 38 points
  35. If it's been rocky for years, why push for more money instead of freeing himself when he could? He could have easily broke the bank with any team
    38 points
  36. https://theathletic.com/2495034/2021/04/02/schultz-watching-film-with-falcons-coach-arthur-smith-his-plan-to-fix-them-is-clear/ Schultz: Watching film with Falcons coach Arthur Smith makes his plan to fix them clear By Jeff Schultz Apr 2, 2021 22 ATLANTA — Arthur Smith clicks on the good stuff. The formations at the start of a game that the opponent didn’t see coming. The bunch of three receivers at the top of the screen and the pre-snap motion that had a cornerback so confused he turned the wrong way and left a receiver wide open. The touchdown run out of the wildcat formation on third down in overtime when everybody was thinking pass. He’s clicking through play caller nirvana, narrating and getting giddy all over again. “It’s about creating conflict,” he said. “We want to constantly put stress on the defense.” Smith is less than three months into his job as the Falcons’ coach. Terry Fontenot, the new general manager, has been entrusted to fix the roster. But the coach is the true leader of any football team. Smith, only 38 and three years removed from being a tight ends coach in Tennessee, must set the tone and repair the psyche of a team that too often melted down in games last season and went 18-30 the past three years. He also will reinstall a wide-zone offensive scheme and call plays for an offense that drastically underachieved under former offensive coordinator Dirk Koetter, who ranked as Dan Quinn’s worst mistake. “The thing you can say is this, because I don’t want to be critical of people who were here,” Smith said. “You’re going to learn a lot about someone in tight football games. When you call plays in a tight football game, your personality is going to show. Are you going to be risk-averse? I’m sitting here in a room with you right now, and you’re saying, ‘Show me your philosophy’ So I’ll show the jump pass to Derrick Henry or something that we had never shown before. I’ll show you the overtime at Houston this year when it’s third down, and they’re playing for the pass. You never want to get to the point of, ‘OK, it’s first-and-10 after a run. They’re going to pass.’ Everybody’s looking for an edge.” Smith agreed to let me watch film with him. My hope was to get a feel for his personality and philosophy as a coach, with the hope of gaining some insight into why he succeeded as the Titans’ offensive coordinator the past two years while the Falcons failed miserably. The last time I did something like this was the Falcons’ offseason between 2015 and 2016. Quarterback Matt Ryan was coming off a subpar season in the first year with Kyle Shanahan as the OC. Ryan showed me mistakes that he made in Shanahan’s scheme and why he struggled and specific areas where he needed to get better. They were as basic as turning and getting his eyes upfield faster after dropping with his back turned. In the season that followed that film session, the Falcons went to the Super Bowl. I mentioned that to Smith, who laughed at my joking insinuation that this day could be a possible foreshadowing for 2021. “I’m not good at predictions,” he said. Good call. Smith first learned how to watch film as an offensive lineman during his freshman year at North Carolina, where he played and later broke into coaching as a grad assistant under John Bunting. Smith remembers, somewhat fondly now, “getting my *** ripped” by line coaches during film sessions. “That’s the best thing about an O-lineman,” he said. “You get called fat, dumb and stupid so many times that after a while it doesn’t matter what happens out there. It prepares you for the job. All of these quarterbacks, they get sensitive. They get a little bit of criticism from you or someone on the internet, and they want to go and cry.” (I think I like this guy.) Most media members who’ve been in NFL locker rooms know offensive linemen are generally the best players to talk to for insightful and plain-language analysis. They also have the humility that accompanies playing such a grunt position. “Maybe it’s because we’re the kind of person who’s willing to put their hand on the ground and get into a car wreck 60 times a game and try to beat the **** out of somebody and enjoy it,” he said. “You don’t really want any credit, and it’s fun. They’re also usually the best guys to hang out with and socialize. They may not be the best-looking guys, but if you want to go out to party, you’re going to have the best time.” Smith’s dream of playing professional football never materialized. But he wanted to remain in the sport, and his love for coaching grew at least in part out of his love for looking at film and finding ways to improve as a player and exploit an opponent’s weaknesses. He agreed to the interview and film session but preferred not to critique Falcons games because he didn’t want to put himself in a position of criticizing current or former Atlanta players or even past coaches. But we looked at enough clips of his time at Tennessee and spoke in generalities about what leads to success or failure that it’s clear he’s going to take the Falcons in a different direction. It’s also clear that one of his primary objectives will be getting this team to perform better under pressure, which would be diametric to so many late-game implosions of a year ago. “Clearly it didn’t work, maybe for multiple reasons,” Smith said. “Maybe something was broken. Maybe there was a lack of confidence late in games. Why is that? I don’t know. But these games are going to come down to the last possession more times than not. In 75 percent of our games, a team is in striking distance in the fourth quarter, which is the way the league wants it.” What generally causes late-game breakdowns? “For whatever reason, doubt crept in, like they were waiting for something bad to happen,” he said. “I’ve been on bad football teams that were not confident. But (at Tennessee) when we got into one-score games, we thought we were going to win. We did. That was our mentality. It comes down to guys being confident situationally and trusting each other. It’s just a mentality.” Smith runs an outside-zone scheme, like Shanahan, but the importance of the scheme can be overstated. No scheme is designed to fail. The problem is when play callers become stale and predictable. When Smith says he strives for balance, “It doesn’t mean we have to have 50 percent runs and 50 percent pass plays. It just means you want to keep defenses off balance. You don’t want to become obvious. Yeah, we’re going to run the football, and we’re going to throw play action at you. But if you’re sitting up there (in the box) and you know what’s coming, then shame on us.” It’s what Shanahan excelled at in 2016. Opposing defenses had no idea what play was being run out of what formation, run or pass, weak side or strong side, what receiver was Ryan’s primary target. “I love creating the conflict — constantly changing personnel and throwing motions at the defense,” Smith said. “And we pride ourselves at our core the way we’re going to play up front — with effort and finish and speed off the football.” Click … Smith navigates on a computer to one of his favorite games in 2020, a 45-26 win at Indianapolis. The Titans had been slapped by the Colts in the season’s first meeting, 34-17, and were held to fewer than 300 yards in offense. The teams are AFC South Division opponents and know each other well so Smith acknowledged he had to try something new in the rematch. So he changed personnel groupings and formations. He moved fullback Khari Blasingame to an offset position instead of behind quarterback Ryan Tannehill. The Titans even came out in the shotgun. “We still did a lot of outside zone; we just did it in ways they hadn’t seen,” Smith said. “They wouldn’t expect us to run it out of the gun.” Tennessee rushed for 229 yards and finished with 449 yards in total offense. Derrick Henry rushed for 178 and scored three touchdowns. (Important disclaimer: Henry did not accompany Smith to Atlanta.) Click … “We’re in 11 personnel now (one running back, one tight end),” he said. “Here, we bunched three (receivers) up top and A.J. (Brown) motions down. We went back to back with this some motions.” (Tannehill throws to a wide-open Corey Davis when the cornerback turns the wrong way and appears to be playing the wrong defense.) Click … Smith shows a play with 12 personnel (one back, two tight ends). Two receivers are to the right, but one runs in jet motion in front of the quarterback as if he’s going to take a handoff on a reverse. Instead, Tannehill hands the ball to Henry. But the Colts defense didn’t bite. Smith: “We got an ugly 3 (yards), but I’m fine. We’re moving.” Click … Houston leads Tennessee 36-29 lead with 1:50 left. The Texans surprisingly attempted a two-point conversion after a touchdown in hopes of taking a nine-point lead instead of just kicking for the point that would’ve made it 37-29. The two-point attempt fails, leaving the deficit at seven. Smith is thrilled. The Titans are primed for these late-game, pressure situations. Tannehill had a pedestrian career in Miami, but he threw 55 touchdowns with only 13 interceptions in two seasons under Smith. Tannehill calmly moves the Titans down the field against the Texans. With 1:45 remaining, nobody feels stressed. Tannehill throws five straight completions before Tennessee uses its final timeout. On first down from the Texans’ 16, Tannehill connects with Jeremy McNichols — the team’s seventh-leading receiver — for 9 yards to the 7. The clock is running inside 10 seconds. “They’re expecting us to clock it,” Smith said. “But we don’t let them get set up. I told them ‘9-1-1.’ That’s our all-go.” A television analyst can be heard saying, “You got to clock it. You got to clock it.” But instead of having Tannehill throw into the ground to stop the clock, the Titans run a play. Brown lines up to the left and gets a slight step on a defender to the corner of the end zone, and Tannehill throws a perfect back-shoulder toss for the tying touchdown. It only gets better in overtime, when Tennessee wins the toss and drives 77 yards in five plays to the Texans’ 5. It’s third-and-goal and most are expecting a pass. Smith knows this. He’s not risk-averse. So he drops Tannehill down low to … receiver? “We came with a random personnel group and went wildcat,” he said. “You’re thinking, ‘They’re not going to be ready for it,’ and they weren’t.” He points to the computer screen. “Look at them scrambling to get down there to get to Tannehill. You’ve got a lot of conflict, a misfit, and now here comes the freight train (Henry) running downhill. Game over.” (Enjoy.) One hoped-for area of improvement by the Falcons under Smith: red zone. It helps to have a great running back like Henry. But the Titans ranked first in red-zone touchdown percentage in 2019 (77.36) and second in 2020 (74.24). The Falcons ranked 25th (51.67) and 26th (53.45) in those years. Predictability is a four-letter word in football. Smith will tell you there’s no excuse for it. Coaches have been breaking down film and trying to find ways to exploit weaknesses for decades, long before those in other sports did. The successful ones are those who don’t fall into ruts and become married to their patterns. “Football has done a crappy job branding itself,” Smith said. “People are talking about analytics, but in football, we’ve been breaking down games for the last 60 years. The sport just has a very primitive, cave-like element to it. But there was no Billy Beane who wrote about it. Paul Brown did it. Pepper (Rodgers) told me a story, and I don’t know if they got in trouble for it, but they put a radio in the quarterback’s helmet in the ’60s. Those guys were always looking for edges, sneaking into the stadium to watch Georgia practice.” The conversation turns to the Falcons. He has tried to analyze the players he has inherited with objectivity, not knowing injuries or other circumstances that could have affected performances in games. So he has tried to focus on an individual’s skill set. “I’m trying to get a feel for who they are instead of passing judgment or thinking, ‘This is what I would’ve done,'” he said. “I’ve had a pretty neutral mindset.” As for improving the mindset of players, he said, “It’s a constant education that will start in the spring. You have to know what you’re doing in critical spots. As we got it going in Tennessee, there was a belief, and (Tannehill) had it in the end of games, and we had it defensively. We were prepared. We were not trying to make things up in critical situations.” (Photo: Courtesy of Atlanta Falcons)
    38 points
  37. Why on earth would anyone consider trading one of the only key pieces on defense?
    38 points
  38. Rings

    Thank You All

    Just wanted to take a second and say thank you to everyone! Outside of a couple people trying to start arguments multiple times, everyone got along for the most part and even if people didn’t like the picks I felt we did so in a way that wasn’t disrespectful to each other and it made it a much better place for everyone. You guys made our roles as MODs easy this weekend and I really enjoyed the draft overall thanks to you. Whether you helped diffuse tension at times or simply bit your tongue on certain comments, thank you. I appreciate you all, enjoy the rest of your weekend!
    37 points
  39. Richie Grant is a flat out baller.
    37 points
  40. Sounds like an ex girlfriend still all in your business
    37 points
  41. I hope the train picks up enough steam that if he's there at #4, we can get a fortune trading out of that spot!
    37 points
  42. Got my 20 year TATF Wings today (self award). Signed up in 2001. After 30 years as a fan. This board was great back then. Levak was the only Mod. He let everything go. TATF was alive and considered the best message board in the league at the time. A real dead zone now. Buddy also hooked several of us TATFers up with corporate tours, marketing studies, luncheons with scouts, field passes, you name it. Any old schoolers out there remember that era? @SacFalcFan, @gazoo, @capologist. We were a close community. Good times my friends! Time is moving on. Need rest.
    36 points
  43. that was the look on his face when they told him how many draft picks they have this year
    36 points
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