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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/31/2020 in all areas

  1. 11 points
    https://www.theplayerstribune.com/en-us/articles/hayden-hurst-atlanta-falcons-who-im-meant-to-be My parents drove five hours to see me. And they had five minutes to talk to me. That’s all the time the doctor would allow while I was under supervision. Five minutes. How do you explain to your parents in just five minutes that you tried to kill yourself? You can’t. That’s the answer. You just can’t. I was so … ashamed. I looked my mom in the eye, felt the handcuffs that locked me to my hospital bed tighten around my wrists, and I just had no words. Nothing. I went through all these different sentences in my head, trying to get them to make sense so I could spit out something. Nothing. Nothing. Nothing. Blank. I just wanted to sink into my bed and disappear beneath my gown. But the handcuffs wouldn’t let me do anything. So there I was, 22 years old. Twelve hours removed from cutting my own wrists. Five feet from my parents. Five minutes to spend with them. And a lifetime to try to come to terms with what had happened. Putting your thoughts — your darkest, most brutal ones — into words is the hardest thing I’ve ever had to do. There I was, 22 years old. Twelve hours removed from cutting my own wrists. Five feet from my parents. Five minutes to spend with them. Everyone asks, Why did you do this? And I knew the answer. Maybe I couldn’t say it … but I knew it. Making it clear to someone else, though, is another thing altogether. They nod their heads, they say they understand but, of course, they don’t. How could they? In five minutes? I mean, it had taken me a long time to understand why I felt that there was no option other than to do what I did that night in 2016 in Columbia, South Carolina. Not long ago my life looked like it was on track. I was going where I was supposed to go, doing what I was supposed to do. I had been a star athlete my whole life. I was the starting tight end for a big-time college football team. Everything seemed fine. Better than fine, actually. Everything seemed great. Four years earlier, in 2012, I had been picked by the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 17th round of the MLB draft. My whole life was about sports. I grew up in Jacksonville during Tim Tebow mania. Our family house was on a cul-de-sac, and I’d spend hours on hours playing whatever I could in the street with my dad or my friends. In eighth grade, I threw 91 mph. I was growing so fast — a foot in a year — that I had to have Tommy John surgery when I was 14. Not because I’d thrown out my arm, but because my ligaments couldn’t keep up with the rate at which I was growing and putting on muscle. I recovered from the surgery just fine, and by my senior year I started to get attention from MLB scouts. My parents and I were prepared for a future that involved pro baseball. Mike Janes/Four Seam Images via AP Images When the Pirates offered me nearly half a million dollars to sign with them to play minor league ball, I was ready. And my family and I made sure we thought everything through. I remember talking to my dad about the deal. He said, “Hey, worst case scenario, it doesn’t work out. You just come back and play football in college, right?” Right. But in my mind, I just wanted to play baseball. I was 18. Drafted by the Pirates. I was on my way to the Show. There was no other pitcher who was going to outwork me. I knew that. There was no hitter who was going to be more prepared than me. I knew that. But what I didn’t know was that the biggest obstacle — the one that would punch me in the face, over and over again — was … me. It was my body that failed, my mind. And I remember the moment it happened. I was doing a bullpen session down in Bradenton, and I threw a pitch wide. And then threw another one wide. And then another. And another. All of a sudden things started moving quickly. I could feel the tips of my fingers going numb. The ball was drenched in sweat the second it touched my hand. My wrist was shaking. I was embarrassed, shocked, confused. I went back to my apartment and tried to just forget about it. But the next day, same thing. Every pitch — every time the catcher had to move from his squat to go get the ball — this imaginary fist would squeeze my chest. I was being crushed. My heart rate would skyrocket, my mind would race. The pitcher in the pen beside me walked off his mound. “Get this kid away from me.” “That s*** is contagious.” Contagious? What the f***? What is this? What is with me? The next three years were ****. As a man of God, I don’t use that word lightly. ****. Every pitch — every time the catcher had to move from his squat to go get the ball — this imaginary fist would squeeze my chest. Every day was a battle with my mind. Because even though I could work on my body — begging it to come back to me, to work how it used to — the fight was actually in my mind. My family is a tight-knit group. We’re always looking out for one another, making sure nobody ever feels alone. But I couldn’t bring myself to tell my parents the truth. Every year I’d tell them that the next season would be the one in which I’d make it out of rookie ball. I was alone. The days were filled with shame, embarrassment. So were the nights. But I had an out at night. I could drink. So I did. And I would drink as much as I could until I couldn’t feel the shame — until I couldn’t feel the fist gripping my chest. I drank with the sole purpose of blacking out. That’s the truth. I’d wake up a few hours later, and get ready for my 6 a.m. workouts with Scott Elarton. He was a pitching coach for the Pirates. And, along with my parents and my incredible sister, Kylie, Scott is a huge part of why I’m here today, alive, writing this. I owe Scott so much. He used to work with me away from everyone else so I wouldn’t have to feel the shame, see the glares. We did everything he could think of to try to fix my problem. Weighted balls. Huge targets. A new motion. But the yips … they exist in your mind. Not in your shoulder. I think, after a while, we both knew that. Sometimes we’d get close. I’d look like I was getting it back. And then I’d get into a game, and, man … I’ll never forget the sound when I hit a kid in the head with a pitch. Knocked him out. I stood there, 60 feet, six inches away, watching him lying there, still as a rock. The sound of the ball smacking against his helmet echoed in my head, while I screamed into my mind. You f***ing monster. Look what you did. What’s wrong with you? The end came in 2015. Spring training. I was working with Scott and it just wasn’t happening. Nearly three years of trying to beat this … this … whatever it was. And no progress. I threw another one high and wide, walked off the mound and just started crying. Scott came over. We cried together. It was over. We’d lost. He asked me what else I was passionate about. And for so long the answer would be nothing. But that passion had died somewhere along the way in Bradenton. So I thought of football. I thought of watching Gator games as a kid, I thought of playing in high school and how much I’d loved it. I told Scott it was time we got my dad down there to talk about what was going on, and what I needed to do. My dad had coached football when I was younger, he knew I could make the switch. I had the size, the strength. Through the years I had given my parents glimpses into my struggles, but had never quite been able to tell them the whole truth. To open up to my dad, when I had finally decided it was over, felt like a release in a way. He told me, “This thing … these yips, they won’t follow you.” They didn’t follow me. But everything else did. Your mind, well … it comes with you wherever you go. I was lucky enough to know a backup QB at South Carolina named Perry Orth. He helped to get Steve Spurrier, the Gamecocks’ coach, to come down to Jacksoville to watch one of my workouts. He offered me a preferred walk-on spot for the 2015 season. I felt like I was turning a new page. I believe in second chances, and I also believed in myself. My freshman year was solid. I got in a few games, started impressing some coaches and making a name for myself. But, man, there is just something about the nighttime. No matter how good my day had been, or how well I had played … when the sun set, I just felt like the same old Hayden. I kept drinking like I had in Florida. In my darkest moments, I would remember something that had happened long ago. When I was 10, my uncle committed suicide. He’d struggled with alcoholism. Two years after he died, his son committed suicide, too. I remember seeing the paramedics loading his body bag into an ambulance. None of it made sense. But by the time I started drinking in Columbia, my cousin’s decision to commit suicide was beginning to become almost understandable. One drink, and I’d feel the weight of failure. Two drinks, and I’d think about all the lies I’d told myself. Three drinks, and I’d feel the fist on my chest again. And eventually I’d fade into the night. Incoherent, afraid, angry, sad, confused, depressed, anxious. One night in January 2016, I don’t know exactly what happened, but I mixed alcohol with pills and … I really don’t know. When I woke up the next morning, my wrists were all bandaged up and handcuffed to the hospital bed. I still had my shirt on. It was covered in my blood. Someone came and told me what I had done. I didn’t know how to react. I had a thought. If I’d had a gun, I would have died last night. My parents came to see me a few hours later. That day is a blur — those few weeks are, really. But what I remember was the feeling of never ever wanting to be that broken again — maybe it was because the whole experience had scared me straight. I knew that whatever I did next in my life, I was never going to go back to this point. In that hospital bed I barely felt human. But also I had never felt more alive. There’s a lot to absorb in the wake of a moment like that. I knew one thing for sure, though: I had to give myself over to my family and my support group. I had to open up and be real for once. No more secrets, no more isolated emotions. Waking up in those handcuffs — that was my real second chance. That was my real opportunity to rid myself of the demons that had found their way into my mind in Florida. So I did whatever was asked of me. I started meeting with a therapist on campus. Dr. Malone and I would talk through everything. It was just … I can’t explain really how helpful it was just to be able to talk to someone and not feel any fear of repercussions from what I might say. I leaned on our new coach, Will Muschamp. Our strength coach, Jeff Dillman, would open up the weight room to me at all hours so I could get in there and release some energy. So many people on campus knew little bits about what I was going through, and they were all so helpful. I thank God for those people, and for the University of South Carolina. Of all the things Dr. Malone helped me with, the most crucial was the way he made me feel comfortable enough to be more open with my family. Like I said, we are tight-knit, but there are some things that are just hard to tell your parents. Dr. Malone made that easier. And now I’m closer with my family than ever before. Looking back on that day in the hospital, the night before, the yips in Florida — all of it … sometimes I have to pinch myself to realize that I’m here, that I’m alive and that I’m all right. I haven’t had any alcohol since that night. I haven’t touched any substances. My mind is clearer than it’s ever been. There are good days and bad days — and it’s important to acknowledge and accept them. I know that now. I’m heading into my third year in the NFL. After three seasons at South Carolina, the Ravens drafted me in the first round in 2018. Now I’m an Atlanta Falcon. I couldn’t be more excited to be a part of this organization, but I will also be forever grateful to Baltimore. The Ravens took a chance on me, and I hope I helped build something that will last a long, long time in that city. When I started to tell people what I had been through, I got hundreds of responses from people in Baltimore. They told me that they had been through similar things, or that they had a family member who was going through similar things. All the Ravens fans in my Twitter DMs who were sending me love and saying how proud they were of me — that’s real love. Thank you, Baltimore. Bless y’all. While I was a Raven, I started the Hayden Hurst Family Foundation to raise awareness of mental health issues in adolescents and teens, and to fund mental health services. As much as I love football — and boy, do I love football — I hope that the legacy of this foundation is just as big as the one I leave on the field. When I tell my story now, I try to use detail because, I think, if someone had told me that they had struggled like I did — I never would have believed them. But to find the light, you have to know how dark it can really get. So I hope that, if there’s someone out there who can relate to this story at all, they get this message: There is so much strength in your weakness. Understand that. There is help for you, like there was help for me. I didn’t want to find it at first and it nearly cost me my life. There isn’t a day that goes by when I don’t think about that. But I did find help. And it changed my life. I’m thankful for everyone who had a hand in my recovery, especially my family. Mom, Dad and Sis — I love you guys so much. Thank you. If they weren’t the people they are, I wouldn’t be who I am today. And I know, without a doubt, I am exactly who I’m meant to be.
  2. 10 points
    https://www.cover1.net/2020-nfl-draft-former-all-pro-cb-antonio-cromartie-evaluates-a-few-of-the-drafts-best-cb-prospects/3/ Videos in the link We discussed five cornerbacks for this interview in Jeff Okudah (Ohio State), CJ Henderson (Florida), Kristian Fulton (LSU), Trevon Diggs (Alabama) and Jaylon Johnson (Utah). For each one of these clips, Cromartie details what he sees with his initial reaction. We then talk about other aspects of the play. His commentary will be in italics while my comments will be in bold under each clip. Jeff Okudah, Ohio State AC: “So first off, you have to look at his footwork throughout the entire thing. He’s staying square and never gets his hips turned throughout the entire thing. He’s got that kick-step and he’s able to gain ground at the same time while keeping the receiver in front of him. Also, look where the receiver started. He’s on top of the numbers then ends up outside of the numbers by almost 3 yards. He is still able to stay square the entire time. The whole thing about playing that position that Okudah understands so well is that he’s staying square and making sure he can control the receiver and he didn’t even have to use his hands much until the top of the route.” ZH: “The thing that really stands out to me is his feet here. His feet are very calm and he’s not taking too many steps or over committing. How important is that for a corner to be square and adjust the receiver but also to do that with calm and confident feet?” AC: “Honestly it’s just about patience. Receivers are gonna dance and they can do things to try and make you jump inside or jump outside but it’s just about having patience. If you know the route combination and what is coming then it makes it a whole lot easier. When you are able to play at a high level with high confidence then it doesn’t matter who the receiver is or what he does. When you look at Jeff and what he does, when he’s in press or off, he understands what offenses are giving him and for me that is what separates him from everybody else. He is very technically sound, has a very high football IQ, and it shows week in and week out.” ZH: “Yeah, and honestly you could say that about all the Ohio State cornerbacks and how they are taught with Damon Arnette and Shaun Wade in the slot as well. I just love his feet here and how he is able to redirect while taking so little steps.” AC: “The feet and eyes are the most important things for a corner. The more you can do with that, the easier you can move around and control the receiver, put him where you want to put him, and go from there.” “The only thing I would take away here is I would love for him to take another shuffle step to the inside because if he takes another shuffle step to the inside, he gets his hands on the receiver and is able to control him. So he wouldn’t be in that trail position anymore, he’d be sitting right there on the inside shoulder of the receiver. That’s the only thing I would take away from it, he made a great play on the ball coming back in and slicing the ball. He knows he has safety help over the top so he can take those chances. His poise at the top of the route is amazing. He’s so poised and relaxed at the top that he’s breaking with the receiver at the same time to be able to undercut it. He trusts the guys around him too. When you play that corner position, you have to know where everybody is. When you know where everybody is, you learn how to play football a lot better. We always said understand your good help and your bad help. The good help is your safety that’s coming down and the bad help is a linebacker dropping to you because those guys are run reading first so you have to play tighter coverage and play on top of the route. When you look at Jeff over the season when he’s playing certain coverages, he understands that. He knows where everybody is going to be so he can play a lot more aggressively in certain coverages. He’s not a super-fast guy, he’s a 4.5 guy, he’s a guy that understands his limits and he understands what he can do and what he cannot do.” ZH: “Absolutely. I can’t think of anything to really add to that. I guess I want to ask you with your experience which you prefer. We see Okudah get his hands on guys at the line in man to re-direct routes at times and other times he will mirror without using his hands. Do you prefer corners to use their hands at the line?” AC: “Initially, no. I was a guy who was motor mirror. I honestly didn’t start getting my hands on guys until I was traded to New York. It was more like ‘Hey you gotta use your bigger frame so get your hands on these guys and control them with that’ so that is when I started doing that.” ZH: “So that is when you started getting into the step-kicking and such. Did you ever do that before you got there?” AC: “I was but playing this position is a chess game. You don’t always want to have to put your hands on a guy. You want him to think you’ll always put your hands on him and mess up his timing. It is a mental game out there and you don’t want to play checkers out there while somebody else is playing chess. You want to have that chess match every single down. What’s my next move or what’s his next move? It’s picking up on little things like what routes he runs in motions or certain alignments that makes you play things differently and to get in tuned to what is going on so you can outplay him before the play even starts.” C.J Henderson, Florida AC: “Honestly this is just me and I’m a hard scout, this is terrible technique. Just from the simple fact that if this guy runs a post, he’s running away from him. Look where Henderson starts. He starts on top of the numbers and ends up 2-3 yards outside the numbers. Now he makes a great play on the ball but that ball should have been picked off. You want to be able to still play technique sound and be on top of that because if this guy runs a post, he’s running away from you. Your safety is going away from you, so if you are going to open up like that, you better make a play on it every time. If I’m teaching a guy what not to do, this is something I’m telling them not to do. He made a helluva play on the ball but I think he should have picked it off. That’s not a ball you bat down; you gotta go up and pick that ball off. The top guys that we are talking about today, that’s what I don’t see from them a lot. They don’t take the ball away from guys. Picking this ball off changes the game and gives your offense momentum in a big game. He has to play better technique because in the NFL he won’t get away with that. Everyone runs 4.3.” ZH: “Yeah, it’s a weird play too because he retreats off the line and then backs up outside the numbers basically opening up to the inside when he doesn’t have any help there.” AC: “He zone turns instead of man turns.” ZH: “How would you prefer him play that route there. With no safety help over the top, you’d rather him take away the inside right?” AC: “If I knew my inside help was coming from my down safety, I’m gonna play outside leverage because if he runs a slant or a dig or anything, that safety is going to slide right underneath it. I’m going to play head up and a little bit outside and press him inside. I don’t want to open the gate that gives him 30 yards of open run. If you do that in the NFL, coaches are gonna see that in the both and they are gonna start running routes away from you.” “He’s just doing his job on this one. He stays square, shuffles his feet. [Ja’Marr] Chase is really not running any type of route. He’s running a route we used to call star pass which is a 4-6-3 with him running a stop route or a dig or a flat route to the bottom. Basically he makes a great play on the ball that he should make on that ball because the receiver is being lazy in his route running.” ZH: “Henderson is a bit of a polarizing prospect because he has all the skill and athleticism you want but the technique and other aspects aren’t really there. What is your overall opinion of his game?” AC: “Honestly, he’s the most athletic DB in the draft that I’ve seen. Athleticism is through the roof but the only con I have on him is I don’t think he knows what he’s playing half the time. I need to see better technique because you can only get away with so much with your athletic ability playing at the NFL level. You have to be technically sound and understand what guys are giving you so you know what to take away.” Kristian Fulton, LSU ZH: “One thing I want to say before I let you talk about this play, I love Fulton’s mindset. He’s going against this 4.2 receiver and he doesn’t back down and gets right in his face.” AC: “I think it’s great and he’s playing to his ability. What he does best is he presses. The only thing I would take away from it is I’m not going to lung at a guy who runs 4.2. I’m going to be patient and contact him at the line and then go from there. I think he makes a heck of a play on the ball and he’s doing what he’s supposed to do. He’s staying in the hip pocket and doing what he’s supposed to do.” ZH: “One reason I’m just so high on him is the confidence he has. How much do you like that confidence to still get in the face of a player who he is much slower than in Ruggs.” AC: “You want your corner to play with confidence. If he’s not gonna play with confidence, he can’t play. I love the fact that he’s going up there and challenging a guy in a big game like this. You have to go up there and challenge those guys. It’s the best of the best going at it and you have to just play football.” “My only takeaway here would be not to catch himself. He shuffles outside and stops his feet and then goes again. I don’t know if you see that but that is why the receiver got on the outside of him. If he shuffles his feet all the way through, the receiver has to come back inside and if the ball is thrown back-shoulder then he gets an easy interception.” ZH: “So you want him to essentially keep that shuffle at the line and not stop at the contact point?” AC: “Yeah, because if he keeps his feet shuffled, it’s a possibility that he gets the receiver out of bounds. If you can get the receiver out of bounds, the play is over with. Overall, he’s playing great defense though. He is in the receiver’s hip pocket and using the sideline to pinch him out of bounds.” Trevon Diggs, Alabama AC: “This right here is exactly what you want. The guy gives him a stutter go — it wasn’t a great stutter go — but Diggs stay in the up-field shoulder and goes up and attacks the football. You can’t ask for anything more from a guy who does that. He went up and made a play on the ball that was not intended to be made a play on. He made a heck of a play for his defense. Just look at it. He sinks when the receiver sinks, he looks back when the receiver looks back, and he got his eye on the ball. He’s playing through the receiver and plays up to the ball. Most DBs would turn their backs to the receiver and the receiver would give them a nudge and catch the ball for a touchdown. He’s playing through the receiver and playing through his hands to get the interception.” ZH: “He never loses track of the receiver here which is huge. As someone who has done it at a high level like you did, what are you looking at to know when to turn around and make a play?” AC: “You just play the receiver, honestly. His hands and eyes are gonna tell you everything. When the ball is coming, a receiver’s eyes get big. Once you see that, you gotta flip your head around as quickly as possible and try to make a play on the ball.” He does a great job of widening the receiver. Look where the receiver starts compared to where he ends up outside of the hash on top of the numbers. I’d rather for him to go up and get that football because in the NFL, guys are gonna go up and go get it. He may be on Sportscenter if he don’t go up and attack that ball in the air. Great technique though and great finish and that’s all you can ask for. He basically ran the route for the guy. These two clips you have on here of Diggs, he ran the route for the receiver both times.” ZH: “What are your overall thoughts on him? Like Henderson, he is a bit of a polarizing prospect in this draft class.” AC: “I think he had an overall great year but I would like to see more from him. That is mostly due to the fact that he is new to the position. When they got into the big games late in the year, I didn’t see that playmaking ability. I thought I was gonna see a little more from him when he played guys from LSU but I didn’t see that. For me, I’d like to see him step up bigger in bigger ball games. He’s a helluva playmaker, he just has to have confidence in himself to go out and go do it.” Jaylon Johnson, Utah ZH: “This is actually an interesting coverage here from Utah, as Johnson starts in press and then he gets outside and gets into trail technique.” AC: “I’m going to tell you what coverage they are playing right now: They are playing a soft-two trail. So you see where the safeties are and you see the corners are playing outside and underneath. They are basically playing a two-man from outside. If this were quarters, the safety would have drove on this crossing route. Both corners are playing outside and attacking underneath, so you are basically looking at a softcover two outside leverage with the corners attacking underneath.” ZH: “Considering that coverage and technique they are playing, what do you think of this rep from Johnson?” AC: “His closing speed is what’s remarkable. He’s playing outside leverage and driving on an inside breaking route, so just showing that closing speed is what’s great. If it was a better throw it would probably be a catchable ball but as a DB we would always say that a play has got to be made no matter how it is made and no matter what, we got to get the ball on the ground. I actually love this kid. I started watching him a year ago because one of my guys who coaches at Utah told me to start watching him and I started analyzing him. I like the kid and I like the way he plays and he’s gonna be a good one at the next level.” ZH: “Those Utah players are coached so well and they have so many good players at that program. Johnson certainly is one of my favorites and why I included him in this piece.” “So this last clip is interesting to me because fade routes are so popular near the goal line and, to me, Johnson plays this perfectly. Would you say this is great technique when covering a fade route?” AC: “Oh, this is perfect technique. This is textbook technique. This is staying square and being able to control the man and feel the fade route. He understood exactly what was coming but not only look at that but look at where No. 11 is dropping. That linebacker is dropping, so Johnson understands that he has outside leverage and that he has a dropper that is going to be in the slant window so he doesn’t need to run there. This is what I mean by understanding where you are and who you are playing with. If I don’t have slant responsibility, why am I going to cover the slant? I’m going to do my responsibility and expect my teammates to do their job. The technique though here — you can’t get any better than that. I wish he would have got the pick though. I know it was overthrown but if he gets the pick, that is textbook all the way around.” ZH: “We got to do more of these then for sure. Maybe we’ll do a zoom meeting or something for YouTube and talk some corner play. To close out this interview, and I know we can probably all answer this based on what you have said in this interview, but what would you say are the most important traits a DB has to have to be successful in the NFL?” AC: “Hey, it’s no problem! We could talk another hour about this stuff man. Everyone has been asking me to analyze DBs and I hate to do it because I’m too hard but man I just love talking ball. And absolutely man, just let me know and we’ll do more of this. For me though, you have to have good feet and a high football IQ. You can have everything else like strength or playmaking and such but having that IQ and good feet are the foundation to being a good NFL cornerback. I personally know a ton of scouts are big on football IQ and technique for the NFL.”
  3. 9 points
    KRUNKuno

    Why Gurley will succeed with this team

    Full disclosure...I am not a dawgs fan. I am a tech fan. Let’s get to it. Gurley will thrive here because: 1. Probably the most important reason. This team has monitored Julio and his nagging injuries for quite some time now. They have done so well in making sure that he stays as healthy as possible. Julio has missed less time over the past couple of years than he did when he was a pup on this team. I will credit the FO for that (although our other players seem to get injured like nobody’s business). They will undoubtedly treat Gurley like Julio so that he is able to give us the goods during the season. 2. Opposing teams cannot load the box. Julio commands, at minimum, a double team. The rams did well with misdirection to allow Gurley to find lanes, but they didn’t have a Julio Jones. I believe more lanes will be open for Gurley because of this. 3. Gurley is a receiving option. If all else fails and Koetter does his stupid Koetter bs (abandoning the run), then at least Gurley will be a viable option. 4. Gurley did not seem to get as many reps last year as he did previous years. At one point McVay had Goff passing 50+ times a game. Less wear and tear could only be good for his knee. 5. At the end of the day the guy is a football player. He hasn’t forgotten how to play football, and contrary to popular belief, his body isn’t totally mush yet. With proper spelling and maintenance I believe this signing will pay dividends for us.
  4. 5 points
  5. 5 points
    By Kelsey Kramer Updated Mar 30, 2020 at 10:57pm getty Two Atlanta Falcons flags fly during the game. Kurt Benkert—a name you will likely hear quite often this upcoming 2020 season. He’s back and ready to compete for the backup QB job with the Atlanta Falcons after being on the injured reserve list. He was injured in a pre-season game which led to him missing the entire 2019 season. So, he had a lot of downtime on his hands but he made the best of it. He spent his time learning how to create a brand, the importance of fan engagement all while using esports to promote himself. Self Branding Kurt had been playing video games for a long time but he wasn’t live streaming. He started live streaming thinking it would be a good idea to brand himself. “When I got hurt I streamed a whole lot to build that online following. I got to make some charity money and see some cool people and cool places, Benkert told Heavy.com. It’s a way for fans to get my opinion live instead of me reaching back out on Twitter.” Benkert doesn’t feel like he doesn’t fit in though since he’s an athlete and the other esports players spend 8-10 hours a day, every day playing. He’s backed off now since everyone is doing it while in quarantine. Learning Sign Language Benkert befriended a 13-year-old deaf girl, Soleil ‘EwOk’ Wheeler and spent his time recovering from surgery learning sign language so he could play with her. “Her dad reached out to me and asked if I would be interested in learning basic sign language to be able to play video games with his daughter. People weren’t accommodating her. But she was really good at the game (Fortnite). So, I started learning basic sign language just to be able to communicate about strategies in the game. Then we both got invited to the same event.” “One pro player, one athlete or someone notable team up and play in this tournament together. That’s kind of how she got known. When she went to the tournament she blew up and then she signed a deal with FaZe, the big esports team. She’s making a lot of money and doing really well for herself. But it all started with getting her publicity out there that she was playing with an NFL player.” Make an Impression Sam, Kurt’s wife is the one who actually encouraged Kurt to engage with fans. “One of my old jobs was marketing and I thought, just do it, just get out it can’t hurt, Sam said. I want to watch him play one day and more people following him will make it enjoyable when it does happen.” “Also I picture me like if I tweeted at someone who I thought was cool it takes like two seconds for him and they think it’s cool.” Kurt also reflected on his childhood and thought about what his feelings would be if a celebrity would ever “notice him.” “It doesn’t take much for me to leave an impression but to them, it could make their entire day. Like when I was a kid I loved football. I think about what would I do if my favorite players responded to me if Twitter was around then.” “When I’m not too busy I’ll get on social media and respond to people.” https://heavy.com/sports/2020/03/atlanta-falcons-kurt-benkert-learns-sign-language/
  6. 5 points
  7. 5 points
    octoslash

    Just for @mad597

    If you really want his attention you should smack yourself.
  8. 5 points
    Forget where CBS has them ranked and look at the production. Passes defended is a key stat for a CB as well as tackles. Fulton is a really good player, IMO Gladney is SUPER-PRODUCTIVE in the run game as well as the pass and the stats back it up. Essang Bassey is another SUPER-PRODUCTIVE cb but his skill set is in the middle as a slot db, not out by himself shutting down a half of the field. He would be a stellar pick in the later rounds to cover the Edleman-ish quick, smaller NFL receivers in the spread offense.
  9. 5 points
    8MileBend

    NEW JERSEYS IN APRIL!!!

    I was just meaning I liked the helmet d**khead.
  10. 5 points
    red falcon

    Kirk Herbstreit says....

    Hey believe what you want bro. If you vote only based on party then you are part of the problem.
  11. 4 points
    Exactly what we need at CB1. Good technique, physical at the LOS in press, can play off, not afraid to tackle (can get better), 4.47-40, 6.94-3C, and a little swag. And BTW give me Josh Uche at 47 while we at it
  12. 4 points
    FentayeJones

    Clayborn to the Browns

    2021
  13. 4 points
    I wanted to look at Chris Lindstrom in his first full game since his injury without splitting snaps with anybody. It was against the 49ers. Like my previous Gono thread, I'm writing as the game goes on so it was may seem repetitive at times. -A little late to get downfield on WR screen but once those legs start pumping, watch out. He's fast getting downfield. -Very good lateral quickness and mirroring when pass blocking. -Blocked first lineman on run to right then pummeled the next guy to the ground after disengaging first guy. -Fires off quick and completely manhandled #96 on 49ers by taking him to the ground. Impressive. -Gets slightly beat on the swim move but quickly moved his feet and took DL out of pass play. -Anchored well on the stunt move by DL. -Very next play got pushed back on bull rush and never anchored...bad technique. -Good hand punch. -Dropped his head slightly but quick enough to move laterally to prevent a disruption to pocket. -Always looking for someone to block when no one in his area -Nice lateral agility on toss play to left. Never let lineman get inside on him. -Got slightly pushed back to allow lineman to disrupt running play enough. Lost leverage. -Destroyed #91 from the side while his "brother" McGary was engaged head on. -Great hand usage to keep lineman from getting squared up on him. -Got a little upright in pass pro and pushed back to disrupt pocket. Entire line got pushed to be honest. -Nice pull block to spring Freeman for 10 yard gain. Showed athleticism. -Nice initial hand punch but got upright and pushed back. Recurring theme. -"Bench pressed" lineman and anchored well. When using proper anchor technique, he does well in pass pro because he's strong enough. -Got to second level very quickly. Freeman took wrong hole. -Knocked Bosa on his a$$ while McGary was directly engaged with him. Bosa literally flew sideways. -Good push on Ollison's 1 yard rushing TD -Got put on skates on a stunt but recovered well -Let lineman get extended and got beat nearly resulting in Ryan sack Overall. Lots of positives. Negatives are his tendencies to get upright, lose leverage, and get pushed back as a result. These are very coachable though. Against a very good 49ers DL and only his THIRD NFL game, he looked really good and earned his first round billing. He is going to be a really good one for us with some all pros and pro bowls in his future. Side note...Wreh-Wilson had a phenomenal game. Could have had 2-3 INTs based on instincts and jumping routes alone. Glad he got resigned.
  14. 4 points
    Jaylon Johnson has been one of my favorite watches. Hate he ran a slow forty, but he's got true shut down potential.
  15. 4 points
  16. 4 points
    I would be wary of believing anything to do with China right now.
  17. 4 points
    If your point is "Will the Falcons FO take a chance on him", then I'm with you. I think it's highly unlikely. If your point is "he should be off the board because of this", then I'm not with you. You can imagine that after being reinstated he was put through multiple random tests and he clearly passed them all.
  18. 4 points
    Fulton was suspended by NCAA for faking a urine test - supposedly because he smoked and didn’t want to get caught. That’s what they call in the biz...a red flag. He got a two year suspension that was later reduced to one. Before the hippies join in the “pot is legal or should be brigade” chimes in - it wasn’t then and Fulton deemed it a good idea to do this. The punishment the first time or two is relatively minor for failed test for pot. This leaves us with the following conclusions: 1) Fulton is just stupid 2) Fulton will cheat whenever he can and doesn’t feel bound by rules & authority. 3) This is just the one time he got caught. 4) Fulton had tested positive multiple times and he was down to his last strike so he felt the need to cheat to pass the test. None of those sounds like a player that TD and DQ want to invest in - especially after the failure of the Jalen Collins experiment.
  19. 4 points
    Hoping we sign Clay out of some of Trufant cap savings in June. Bruh....31 ain’t old!
  20. 4 points
    Vandy

    Kristian Fulton @16......case closed

    Glad you’re not in charge of our draft. Although it wouldn’t shock me. On second thought....TD, is that you? (sorry, Ikie)
  21. 4 points
    So far so good by the front office
  22. 4 points
    gazoo

    Kirk Herbstreit says....

    This is what some of you guys who are politicizing this do. You refuse to recognize the other side of the argument about all the harm being caused by the shutdown, and if anyone mentions it you accuse them of not taking this seriously. Well, the suicide hotlines are already experiencing a huge increase in calls, one county in TN had 9 suicide the last 2 days. People are already losing everything they’ve worked for all their lives. Wiped out in financial destruction, losing their businesses and jobs. We just heard from federal reserve that Coronavirus job loses could be 47 million with a 32% unemployment just based on cirremt shutdown. The suicide rate during recession/ depression years can be 12 - 14% in every 10,000 Americans each year. That doesn’t include the drug overdoses and other deaths form the mental health crisis. If you ignore the possibility of a long shutdown plunging America into a long term depression you are just playing politics.
  23. 4 points
    gazoo

    Kirk Herbstreit says....

    There are several anti inflammatory, anti virals etc showing great promise. Different treatments and drugs can treat sick people at different stages. I heard of an HIV immunosuppressant than only requires two shots in the belly of people on a respirator near death, and it shuts down the cytokines storm immediately and gets the patient off the respirator. There are numberous ones. The hydroxychloroquine with azithromycin seems to work best if administered prior to acute onset of symptoms. So if a person is in high risk group and starts getting tightness of breath or flu like symptoms, hit them immediately with these two drugs and it prevents almost all of them from every having to go the hospital and in 5 days the virus is completely gone. Unfortunately the media and some politicians are politicizing this and it’s making it much harder on everyone. Shameless.
  24. 4 points
    PokerSteve

    Kirk Herbstreit says....

    The American media is the enemy of the American president and the American people, and they have indeed grown arrogant. “The opportunity of defeating the enemy is provided by the enemy himself,” Sun Tzu wrote. Those of us who have been watching President Trump’s daily press briefings on the Covid19 virus have not been surprised at the appalling disrespect the reporters show the man. They have behaved this way since Trump became a candidate for the office of the presidency. As the world now grapples with this pandemic, each day the President and his team patiently explain to these people everything they know to date, and then he takes questions. Nearly every question is an attempt at a gotcha moment. They read part of a statement the President made, often an edited statement, then challenge him to defend that which needs no defense. He has defeated them, but they have yet to realize it. Our not-intrepid press corps nearly all operate on the premise that the President came late to the crisis when in fact he was on it from moment one, as soon as the truth of it emerged from China too late. The WHO, NIH and the CDC were each wholly unprepared, having spent their billions on social justice projects and studying drunk monkeys. Not one of those three agencies saw the virus as a potential pandemic; not in December nor January. Trump did. It is those institutions and the irresponsibility of previous administrations who bear the blame for the shortages of medical equipment and supplies, Gov. Cuomo in particular. But every question from this press corps is meant to impugn the President’s handling of this global event. They make fools of themselves day after day and are apparently too dim to realize that fact, so they show up the next day and embarrass themselves again. They ask questions that simply cannot be answered at this point. They ask for speculation then attack him for speculating. The President mentions a possible successful treatment and they denounce both him and the drug -- which has so far turned out to be very successful. No matter how many times he explains that the team is doing its very best to come up with appropriate guidelines as new data is revealed, they seem to think Trump should be able to answer the unanswerable. Like a cackle of hyenas, they shout at him, each asking the same questions over and over again. He patiently answers or has one of the virology experts present address the question, but no answer pleases them. Each one of them wants to catch him in a mistake so the clip of their question will go viral. But what has gone viral is the absolute inanity of these people and Trump’s restraint and aplomb before them. Most people could not, would not put up with such a despicable colony of weasels. Since the moment Trump became the candidate, the media set out to destroy him. They were overwhelmingly confident that they could do exactly that. They had always been successful in such endeavors before. From the Billy Bush tape, to the Russia collusion hoax, the Ukraine phone call, impeachment, and now this virus, they have not let up for one moment. But he has confounded them. “Do not repeat the tactics which have gained you one victory, but let your methods be regulated by the infinite variety of circumstances.” Sun Tzu. What is almost hilarious is that the media never learn from their many mistakes. He wins almost every time. He is most certainly winning this time. Many millions of Americans are watching these briefings and seeing firsthand just how rude and disrespectful most of the “reporters” in the room are. There may be a few who show respect and are interested in learning something. The rest are mere little yappy dogs trying to nip at Trump’s ankles and getting nowhere. He skillfully exposes them for who and what they are: ignorant and noxious. They want nothing more than to hurt the man who has handled this crisis far better and more aggressively than any other world leader. The fanatical media has more than demeaned itself, it has rendered itself irrelevant. Americans who are watching are disgusted by their obvious and relentless attacks on the man. No wonder the President’s approval ratings are climbing. We are seeing a man adept at solving problems and getting things done and watching the media that is a barrel of monkeys willing to destroy the country to take him down. Bill Maher has been wishing for a recession for a few years now. Our media defends China and tries to ruin their own President! What makes these briefings so entertaining is when the President calls them out for their dishonesty. He has a steel-trap mind and remembers what he has said. When they twist or edit his words, he knows it and humiliates them. But they seem not to realize they are being humiliated. President Trump has been teaching us all. It is only the men and women of the media who fail to learn. Donald Trump, as John Perazzo has written is a superb and unappreciated President. “Engage people with what they expect; it is what they are able to discern and confirms their projections. It settles them into predictable patterns of response, occupying their minds while you wait for the extraordinary moment — that which they cannot anticipate.” Sun Tzu This is that moment. Read more: https://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2020/03/the_unbearable_pettiness_of_the_washington_press_corps.html#ixzz6ICTZgVoj Follow us: @AmericanThinker on Twitter | AmericanThinker on Facebook This post should be pinned at the top of the thread. Separates fact from bullshlt.
  25. 4 points
    Williamb

    Kirk Herbstreit says....

    Im with ya man. He wasn't my first choice to be republican candidate. And even now, there are times when i slap my head and say "will you please shut up already". But, he is our president and i believe he is doing the best he can for our country (which is far better than the clown show alternatives that i have seen). The man could cure cancer, solve world hunger, and give everyone a million dollars and people would still complain. I'm so tired of it! Can't we just pull together in this time of crisis, pray for the man and his advisers, and move on from this political crap. GO FALCONS!!!!!!!!!!!
  26. 4 points
    AUTiger7222

    NEW JERSEYS IN APRIL!!!

    That's downright ugly as sin!!
  27. 4 points
    I understand completely.i struggle with my mental health everyday.all these stories and some musicians are helping me to realize i dont have to be ashamed to seek help.
  28. 3 points
    I hope we do. I'm surprised they haven't already.
  29. 3 points
    Campbell and Tru have been two of our more egregious defenders in terms of miscommunication. I’m thankful both are no longer here, though Tru was dominant in 2014 and 2015
  30. 3 points
    If we come out of the draft with Chaisson, Uche, or Baun, I'll be happy. I dig all three. Add a safety like Winfield, Delpit, or McKinney, and we're golden with whatever else we get imho.
  31. 3 points
    https://theathletic.com/1713808/2020/03/31/roster-reset-analyzing-the-falcons-after-first-wave-of-free-agency/ The Falcons were busier than expected in the early going of free agency. The team addressed needs at edge rusher and running back and also filled holes from a depth perspective. Still, the upcoming NFL Draft will be important to take care of those final needs, such as cornerback and linebacker. For now, here’s a close look at where the Falcons’ roster stands for the (hopefully) 2020 season. Offense Quarterback: Matt Ryan, Matt Schaub, Kurt Benkert, Danny Etling. Analysis: Ryan will be Atlanta’s starting quarterback for the 13th consecutive season. Last year marked only the third time he had to miss a game in the NFL. Ryan has thrown for more than 4,000 years in each of the past nine years. Schaub’s team option was picked up, which makes him the veteran backup, and that should still be expected once the season draws close to beginning. Benkert and Etling should battle it out for the third quarterback/practice squad spot. And if one of the two happens to impress more than expected, perhaps Schaub is suddenly found in a competitive spot. Running back: Todd Gurley, Brian Hill, Ito Smith, Qadree Ollison, Craig Reynolds. Analysis: In a worst-case scenario, Gurley, due to his lingering knee issue, is a third-down back who can contribute as a receiver out of the backfield. The best-case scenario involves Gurley managing his knee just fine while breaking off big plays as a runner or receiver, much like he did during the bulk of his time with the Los Angeles Rams. Regardless, the risk of adding Gurley to the roster was low and well-calculated. Behind Gurley, Hill and Smith will be the top two competitors to engage in a timeshare. Of course, the Falcons could add a running back in the first four rounds of the upcoming draft. Fullback: Keith Smith. Analysis: Smith signed a three-year contract to remain as Atlanta’s primary fullback. His roster spot is practically guaranteed entering the preseason. Wide receiver: Julio Jones, Calvin Ridley, Russell Gage, Laquon Treadwell, Olamide Zaccheaus, Christian Blake, Brandon Powell, Devin Gray. Analysis: Jones is the gold standard for X receivers in the NFL as he embarks on his 10th season. Opposite of Jones once again will be Ridley, who is making a name for himself as a young play-maker. Working the slot primarily will be Gage, who took that role after Atlanta shipped Mohamed Sanu to the New England Patriots. Backing up those three receivers is where competition comes into play. Treadwell, a former first-round selection, can be seen as Justin Hardy’s replacement on this offense. Zaccheaus, who had a 93-yard touchdown reception at home against the Carolina Panthers last season, will have every opportunity to back up Ridley once again. Blake, in practice, replicates a lot of what Jones does, making him an ideal backup at the X receiver spot. Tight end: Hayden Hurst, Jaeden Graham, Carson Meier, Khari Lee. Analysis: Knowing they would be unable to keep Austin Hooper, the Falcons used the second-round pick they acquired from the Sanu trade in a package to land Hurst from the Baltimore Ravens. As a result, Hurst will enter this season as Atlanta’s top tight end target in the passing game. With Jones and Ridley drawing a ton of attention on the outside, there should be plenty of opportunities for Hurst in single coverage over the middle of the field. Backing up Hurst as the primary receiving tight end will be Graham, who filled in for Hooper while he missed three games due to a knee injury in 2019. For now, Meier and Lee will compete for Atlanta’s primary blocking tight end spot, a role held by Luke Stocker last season. Stocker became a cap casualty this offseason. Tackle: Jake Matthews, Kaleb McGary, John Wetzel. Analysis: The only change at tackle, for the time being, is who the primary backup happens to be. Matthews once again will start at left tackle and McGary will man the right side. With Ty Sambrailo becoming a cap casualty, Wetzel — the on-again-off-again lineman from a season ago — is positioned as the only backup tackle on the roster for the time being. Guard: Chris Lindstrom, James Carpenter, Jamon Brown, Matt Gono, Justin McCray. Analysis: Lindstrom is the only sure thing at guard, with his right guard position solidified. Whenever football activities are able to resume again, there should be a wide-open competition at left guard between Carpenter, Brown, Gono and McCray. And if the Falcons draft an interior offensive lineman in the first three rounds of the upcoming draft, that player also could enter the mix. Center: Alex Mack, Sean Harlow. Analysis: While the Falcons could have saved $8 million in cap space with Mack’s release, his value to the offensive line is way too much to overcome in the short term. There was no way Atlanta was going to let Mack go. But considering he is entering the final year of his contract, the Falcons do need a plan for the future at the position. Defense Defensive end: Dante Fowler, Takk McKinley, Steven Means, Austin Larkin. Analysis: The key to the upcoming season could hinge on Fowler and McKinley’s abilities to get after the quarterback. The Falcons have been unable to rush the quarterback at a consistent enough rate the past three years. Fowler is coming off a season when he had 11.5 sacks for the Rams. Atlanta certainly will hope that kind of production continues now that he has reunited with head coach Dan Quinn, who recruited Fowler when Quinn was the defensive coordinator at Florida. McKinley is set to enter a make-or-break year since he’s coming off a season that saw him only record 3.5 sacks. Means, a speedy and fundamental defensive end who missed the 2019 season with an Achilles tear, will factor a great deal into the team’s plan at the position, too. Defensive tackle: Grady Jarrett, Tyeler Davison, Deadrin Senat. Analysis: Jarrett is coming off of his best season as a professional, which saw him record 7.5 sacks. If Fowler’s production carries over from Los Angeles to Atlanta, Jarrett could be seen as a huge benefactor and vice versa. Jarrett can do everything along the interior and was able to celebrate his individual accomplishment a year ago with a Pro Bowl berth. Davison was re-signed as Atlanta’s primary run-stuffer after putting in the best season of his young career. Senat will be entering an ever-important third preseason. DE/DT hybrid: Allen Bailey, John Cominsky, Jacob Tuioti-Mariner. Analysis: While he didn’t put up gaudy numbers, Bailey was used as both a defensive end and defensive tackle and was particularly impressive against the run. Cominsky’s development will be interesting to see, especially since there won’t be many, or perhaps any, offseason workouts. When he was drafted, Cominsky was projected in the long-term to be a pass-rushing defensive tackle, similar to how Jack Crawford was used the past couple of seasons. Without the offseason reps, it remains to be seen if that remains the plan for 2020. Linebacker: Deion Jones, Foye Oluokun, Ahmad Thomas, LaRoy Reynolds, Edmond Robinson. Analysis: Jones will enter his fifth season as Atlanta’s top Mike linebacker. Injured for most of 2018, it took some time for Jones to get close to full health this past year. In 2020, Jones should be as close to 100 percent as he has been since before the foot fracture. But the big question will be who mans the Sam linebacker position that De’Vondre Campbell played the past four years. For now, Oluokun would be the top option, but that position always can be addressed in the upcoming draft. Depending on how Oluokun is used, the Falcons must also have a plan at Will linebacker, too. Cornerback: Kendall Sheffield, Isaiah Oliver, Blidi Wreh-Wilson, Jordan Miller. Analysis: Entering the offseason, the Falcons only have four corners on the roster. And Miller will be suspended for the first three games of the season. That alone makes it easy to believe that Atlanta will add a corner, or two, in this year’s draft. As for the four on the roster right now, Sheffield’s play down the stretch of the 2019 season might have earned him the right to be the team’s top option at cornerback. Oliver improved considerably during the second half of the 2019 season, and Wreh-Wilson proved to be reliable as a stand-in if called upon. Safety: Keanu Neal, Ricardo Allen, Damontae Kazee, Sharrod Neasman, Jamal Carter, Chris Cooper, C.J. Reavis. Analysis: While thin at corner, the Falcons are deep in numbers at safety. Neal, Allen and Kazee figure to play a lot as Atlanta employs even more three-safety sets. Neasman, signed to a one-year deal recently, is a standout on special teams. Carter should have a solid chance to back Neal up at strong safety. Nickel: Allen, Kazee, Cooper. Analysis: Given the numbers at safety, it makes sense for the Falcons to use that position when it comes to defending the slot. With Atlanta releasing Desmond Trufant, Sheffield’s priority — depending on how the Falcons attack the upcoming draft — will shift to being an outside cornerback. If this in fact becomes the case, a rotation of Allen and Kazee in nickel situations seems likely to be in store. This would allow the Falcons to disguise their looks even better, which is a big component of the defense’s player-friendly scheme. Specialists Place-kicker: Younghoe Koo. Analysis: The Falcons figure to add another place-kicker, whether it’s late during or after the upcoming draft. But the Falcons were happy with Koo, who came in during the bye week and made 23-of-26 field goals with a long of 50 yards. Punter: Ryan Allen, Sam Irwin-Hill. Analysis: The Falcons are moving on from Matt Bosher, with Allen and Irwin-Hill set to compete at punter. Both were on the roster last year at different times, although Irwin-Hill, a native Australian, dealt with a work visa issue that resulted in his stint lasting less than a full week. Allen averaged 41.9 yards per punt in eight games, with a net of 37.5, and put 14 attempts inside the 20-yard line. Long-snapper: Josh Harris. Analysis: Harris will enter his ninth season as the Falcons’ long-snapper. He figures to be the only specialist not to undergo a competition at the position.
  32. 3 points
    Trade down to 26th and draft Winnfield while adding pick #55. 26th: Winfield Jr 47th: Jaylen Johnson 55th: Josh Uche 78th: Madubuike 119th: Tyler Biadasz 143rd: Anthony McFarland 227th: JR Reed
  33. 3 points
  34. 3 points
    He's a better player than Henderson.
  35. 3 points
    SLEVEN

    NEW JERSEYS IN APRIL!!!

    New era just released the draft caps for this season and the falcons isn’t available. Makes me think they are altering the logo in some form. https://www.neweracap.com/SPORTS/NFL/NFL-DRAFT/c/SPONFLDRA
  36. 3 points
    1989Fan

    NEW JERSEYS IN APRIL!!!

  37. 3 points
    Barner Yes, Clayborn I can move on from. Give Cominsky the reps.
  38. 3 points
    Hoping Clay comes back. We might need to attack CB early in the draft, and if we do the pass rush is only one injury away from being maybe even poorer than last years. So yeah, Clay would be a valuable rotational piece. Hope he comes back.
  39. 3 points
    gazoo

    Kirk Herbstreit says....

    I’m convinced many Americans had this in November and December including myself.
  40. 3 points
    Malachore

    Kirk Herbstreit says....

    My wife was the same way, she went in with a 102 and her flu came back negative. It's been here, these cases are not new. Just recent.
  41. 3 points
    AustFalcon

    MJD predicts

    2020 production: 280 touches, 1,200 rush yards, 500 rec. yards, 19 total TDs for Gurley http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000001107698/article/projecting-2020-production-for-four-notable-rbs-starting-fresh
  42. 3 points
    Falcanuck

    Kirk Herbstreit says....

    I didn’t do any math. You did. And it was shotty, made-up garbage at best. The US was only hit hard recently. That fatality rate rises as ICUs and hospitals become overrun. Stay the **** inside. You aren’t smarter than infectious disease experts. Also, Canucks are good at not dying too.
  43. 3 points
    I’m hoping Quinn lets Raheem run his own defense and he sticks to coaching.
  44. 3 points
    Falcanuck

    Kirk Herbstreit says....

    It’s not dude. I’m so glad my borders are closed, holy ****. Why deny when you can be safe? Why ignore plainly stated information proven empirically and backed by professionals when you’re an absolute nobody? I’ll never understand. Stay home.
  45. 3 points
    tactician

    Kirk Herbstreit says....

    Nah, we'll be alright.
  46. 3 points
    Vandy

    Kirk Herbstreit says....

    Where are you coming from with this ‘ignorance” narrative? There was some early missteps by leaders, and there’s the usual idiotic few who are always clueless, but overall most people have been scared ****less from this virus by the 24:7 news focused on it. And we had way more lead-time on this than Italy had, so it’s not the same. Plus Italy doesn’t have near the quality healthcare system America has.
  47. 3 points
    Mr.11

    Kirk Herbstreit says....

    Yes it is, because they didn't take it seriously, much like policies (and public opinion) here didn't take it seriously until they were forced to. SARS-CoV2 has no vaccine, highly contagious, and right now killing people at a much higher rate than the flu. We still don't know exactly how many people have it because we don't have enough testing kits, among other things, and not all people are symptomatic. If people went about business like this was just the flu (which shouldn't be taken lightly either), things would be much worse. It's a perfect storm of ignorance and a highly infectious contagion.
  48. 3 points
    RYNE

    MJD predicts

    Lol, so basically he’s going to have a historic season. MJD should try Earth sometime, He may like it.
  49. 3 points
    wartownfalcon

    Kirk Herbstreit says....

    Nope. Just like racism, the media will keep the fire fueled. They make too much money off of it
  50. 3 points
    Who we're interested in might tell us a lot about our defense next year. It depends whether we do more defense traditionally associated with what Quinn runs. Morris does more Cover 2 and ran lots of Cover 6 and Cover 3 too, where Quinn does more straight Cover 3 and Cover 1 (single high stuff).
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