SacFalcFan

United Passenger Dragged From Overbooked Flight.

183 posts in this topic

Disgusting.  For their own mistake.  On the bad side they abused the man, on the good side he will now be able to give up his practice and retire.  

 

Is this the same guy?

 

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We started discussing it in DH's crappy thread here: 

If you want, you can extract all the relevant posts and merge them into this thread, but that'd probably be a pain in the butt.

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Exactly how do you remove people from a plane who don't want to move while being on a tight schedule? And being your fck up to start it off with?

 

Unleash the snakes.

defcon4 likes this

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There's probably no chance that this case ever gets in front of a jury, but it would be interesting to see to what extent our society accepts the idea of a corporation resorting to cracking skulls when we have learned to go along with so many other repugnant things. 

I'll be willing to say it would be a 50/50 case depending on the jury. But united would never take that risk. 

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1 hour ago, SpongeDad said:

Exactly how do you remove people from a plane who don't want to move while being on a tight schedule? And being your fck up to start it off with?

 

Unleash the snakes.

 

SpongeDad likes this

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40 minutes ago, DirtyBirdNorth said:

Big settlement upcoming between the doctor and United.

There's an aspect of this that bothers me a lot.  From what I can gather, airlines have to present a piece of paper detailing a customer's rights and the amount they are legally entitled to in terms of compensation before they can deboard or deny boarding on a situation like this.  Apparently, the next flight available was later in the afternoon the next day, which meant that the amount United owed is likely to be well above the $400 and even the $800 they were offering.  

So as far as I can tell, United tried to avoid paying the full amount they owed, did not present that piece of paper detailing the rights and compensation, and tried to coerce people into "volunteering" so they could pay a lesser amount.  So they seemed to be violating all kinds of federal regulations.  THEN, they called the police to enforce their apparently unlawful process to remove the doctor and it escalated into this.  

In other words, the actions of the police when they apparently knocked the guy out and dragged him off the plane was horrible. But United's actions leading up to calling them to remove the guy is just as disturbing.  All of this, by the way, so they could put four crew members on the plane.  It wasn't even an overbooked situation.  It was simply a full flight and they wanted to get four crew members to the next airport.  

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13 hours ago, Gritzblitz 2.0 said:

There's probably no chance that this case ever gets in front of a jury, but it would be interesting to see to what extent our society accepts the idea of a corporation resorting to cracking skulls when we have learned to go along with so many other repugnant things. 

I'll be willing to say it would be a 50/50 case depending on the jury. But united would never take that risk. 

Im pretty sure the law is on their side.  They completely bungled the entire thing from a message standpoint, but from what I've read, they had the right to remove him forcibly.  

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1 hour ago, Leon Troutsky said:

There's an aspect of this that bothers me a lot.  From what I can gather, airlines have to present a piece of paper detailing a customer's rights and the amount they are legally entitled to in terms of compensation before they can deboard or deny boarding on a situation like this.  Apparently, the next flight available was later in the afternoon the next day, which meant that the amount United owed is likely to be well above the $400 and even the $800 they were offering.  

So as far as I can tell, United tried to avoid paying the full amount they owed, did not present that piece of paper detailing the rights and compensation, and tried to coerce people into "volunteering" so they could pay a lesser amount.  So they seemed to be violating all kinds of federal regulations.  THEN, they called the police to enforce their apparently unlawful process to remove the doctor and it escalated into this.  

In other words, the actions of the police when they apparently knocked the guy out and dragged him off the plane was horrible. But United's actions leading up to calling them to remove the guy is just as disturbing.  All of this, by the way, so they could put four crew members on the plane.  It wasn't even an overbooked situation.  It was simply a full flight and they wanted to get four crew members to the next airport.  

If that's the case, United is in for a world of hurt.  I'd be curious if that's the case, though.  The CEO doubled down on this yesterday.  Seems like a horrible idea if they didn't follow protocol.  

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22 minutes ago, kicker said:

If that's the case, United is in for a world of hurt.  I'd be curious if that's the case, though.  The CEO doubled down on this yesterday.  Seems like a horrible idea if they didn't follow protocol.  

The CEO, from what I've heard, is dealing with morale problems and probably felt that he had to show support for the workers.  The part about them not following protocol is what I'm most interested in.  Obviously I'm not an expert and just going by various news reports.  But if they didn't follow regulations, I agree that they're in for a world of hurt.  Not just in terms of a lawsuit by this particular passenger, but possibly fines by the government and perhaps even more lawsuits from people who found themselves "volunteered" to leave in the past and not given full compensation.  I'm not saying this is what happened, only that it raises some pretty serious questions about United's behavior and process used in situations like this.

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26 minutes ago, Leon Troutsky said:

The CEO, from what I've heard, is dealing with morale problems and probably felt that he had to show support for the workers.  The part about them not following protocol is what I'm most interested in.  Obviously I'm not an expert and just going by various news reports.  But if they didn't follow regulations, I agree that they're in for a world of hurt.  Not just in terms of a lawsuit by this particular passenger, but possibly fines by the government and perhaps even more lawsuits from people who found themselves "volunteered" to leave in the past and not given full compensation.  I'm not saying this is what happened, only that it raises some pretty serious questions about United's behavior and process used in situations like this.

Just read the DOT rule.  400% of the one way ticket cost.  Up to $1350.  If you dont agree, you have the right to sue (ridiculous, but the rule actually says that).

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