mdrake34

Pure Football
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Everything posted by mdrake34

  1. Silence of the Lambs is a cinematic masterpiece.
  2. I think it's yet another thing he can say he tried, probably knowing and/or being told it wouldn't succeed, and then blame its failure on the democrats to rally and inspire further anger in his base.
  3. He is such a disgrace.
  4. You're an alt-right cartoon character.
  5. Yes, you did. You can argue until you're blue in the face, but it won't change a thing. It's not a surprise you would lie yet again and deny it.
  6. I didn't talk about your view on muslims, hm's thread did, and in response you took a personal shot at HM's family. Again, you should be very, very, ashamed. Family is one of the few things that are off limits here.
  7. HM made a thread about your views on muslims, and you responded by taking a shot at his wife. You have less than zero class.
  8. You admitted the second reason you posted that thread was to spite HM. You're a petulant child.
  9. I already knew that you have zero empathy for your fellow man, but to gloat about Governor Deal's "accomplishments" here is just rubbing salt into HM's family's wounds. It's disgusting and you should be ashamed of yourself. You clearly don't get it, or worse, you do, and you posted the deal thread anyways.
  10. And say that marijuana leads directly to heroin use, terrorism and abortion.
  11. Not only that, but he opened this page, scrolled past the three articles I posted from sources other than the AJC, and ignored them, and posted his article. He refuses to admit his Grand Emperor Deal can do any wrong.
  12. MOAR ancle biting!
  13. Ethics Chief in Georgia Wins Suit Over Ouster By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS APRIL 5, 2014 ATLANTA — Jurors have awarded the former director of Georgia’s ethics commission $700,000 after ruling in her favor in a lawsuit in which she said her salary had been cut and a deputy removed for investigating complaints against Gov. Nathan Deal. The jury ruled on Friday in favor of the former official, Stacey Kalberman, after more than two hours of deliberations. The jurors also decided that Ms. Kalberman would receive lawyers’ fees and back pay. “I’m relieved. I’ve honestly and truly believed what happened to me was wrong,” Ms. Kalberman said after the verdict. Ms. Kalberman claimed in her suit against the commission and its current director that commissioners had slashed her salary and eliminated her deputy’s post after the two sought approval to issue subpoenas as part of the agency’s investigation into Mr. Deal’s 2010 campaign reports and financial disclosures. The state argued that the personnel actions were motivated by budget concerns. Mr. Deal, a Republican, was later cleared of major violations in the ethics inquiry and agreed to pay $3,350 in administrative fees. His political opponents seized on Friday’s verdict to raise questions about Mr. Deal as he seeks re-election this year. Brian Robinson, a spokesman for the governor, said that the ethics commission operated independently of elected officials and that the lawsuit involved “an internal dispute between former employees and former commissioners.” Separately, the attorney general’s office declined to comment, citing other pending lawsuits filed by Ms. Kalberman’s former deputy, Sherilyn Streicker, and a former information technology specialist for the commission. Ms. Kalberman’s lawyers argued throughout the trial that the commissioners began moving to push their client out after a May 3, 2011, commission meeting because she had presented them with draft subpoenas in the Deal investigation. Ms. Kalberman was told during a meeting just over a month later that her salary would be cut by about a third and her deputy’s position eliminated, jurors heard. Assistant Attorney General Bryan Webb argued that dire budget problems facing the agency were the motivation behind the personnel actions. Former commissioners who testified at the trial said they were concerned about the agency’s budget after the May 2011 meeting and were taken aback when Ms. Kalberman asked for a raise for herself and some members of her staff in the executive session that followed it. Holly LaBerge, who succeeded Ms. Kalberman as director of the commission, testified that she was contacted by someone in the governor’s office in mid-May 2011 asking if she would be interested in the commission director job and was later contacted by commissioners. All of that happened before Ms. Kalberman had been told about her salary cut and before the job was publicly posted. https://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/06/us/ethics-chief-in-georgia-wins-suit-over-ouster.html?_r=0 Ex-ethics chief in Ga. wins retaliation lawsuit KATE BRUMBACK Associated Press ATLANTA (AP) — Jurors awarded the former director of Georgia's ethics commission $700,000 on Friday, ruling in her favor in a lawsuit in which she said her salary was cut and a deputy removed for investigating complaints against Gov. Nathan Deal. The jury sided with Stacey Kalberman after more than two hours of deliberations, also deciding she would receive attorney's fees and back pay. "I'm relieved. I've honestly and truly believed what happened to me was wrong," Kalberman said after the verdict. "I'm very thankful that our justice system permits this." Kalberman claimed in her suit against the commission and its current director that commissioners had slashed her salary and eliminated her deputy's post after the two sought approval to issue subpoenas as part of the agency's investigation into Deal's 2010 campaign reports and financial disclosures. The state argued that the personnel actions were motivated by budget concerns. Deal, a Republican bidding for another term, was later cleared of major violations in the ethics probe and agreed to pay $3,350 in administrative fees. His political opponents seized on Friday's verdict to raise questions about Deal as he seeks re-election this year. Deal's spokesman Brian Robinson said after the verdict that the ethics commission operates independently of elected officials and that the lawsuit involved "an internal dispute between former employees and former commissioners." Separately, the attorney general's office declined to comment, citing other pending lawsuits filed by Kalberman's former deputy, Sherilyn Streicker, and a former information technology specialist for the commission. Kalberman's attorneys argued throughout the trial that the commissioners began moving to push their client out after a May 3, 2011, commission meeting because she had presented them with draft subpoenas in the Deal investigation. Kalberman was told during a meeting just over a month later that her salary would be cut by about a third and her deputy's position eliminated, the jury heard. In her closing argument, Kalberman attorney Kim Worth argued that her client faced direct retaliation for zealously pursuing an investigation into the complaints against Deal's campaign. Assistant Attorney General Bryan Webb countered that dire budget problems facing the agency were the motivation behind the personnel actions. Former commissioners who testified at the trial said they were concerned about the state of the agency's budget after the May 2011 meeting and were taken aback when she asked for a raise for herself and some members of her staff in the executive session that followed it. Holly LaBerge, who succeeded Kalberman as director of the commission and still holds that post, testified during the trial. She said she was contacted by someone in the governor's office in mid-May 2011 asking if she'd be interested in the commission director job and was later contacted by commissioners. All of that happened before Kalberman had been told about her salary cut and before the job was publicly posted, jurors were told. After the verdict, members of the jury met Kalberman in the courthouse hallway and hugged her. http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/sdut-ex-ethics-chief-in-ga-wins-retaliation-lawsuit-2014apr04-story.html Jury sides with Former State Ethics Commission Director in lawsuit by: Richard Elliot Updated: Apr 4, 2014 - 3:26 PM A jury awarded the former director of the State Ethics Commission $700,000 after she claimed the commission forced her out of her job because she opened an investigation into the 2010 gubernatorial campaign of Gov. Nathan Deal. Stacey Kalberman sued the Ethics Commission, claiming it forced her out of her job by slashing her pay by $35,000 and eliminating her chief deputy's position. After the verdict, Kalberman said she felt vindicated. "I'm relieved, because the justice system allowed me to bring my claim," said Kalberman. "It allowed me to tell my story, so I didn't just have to walk away from something I thought was terribly wrong." Judge Ural D. Glanville ruled that Kalberman's attorney, Kim Worth, could not call Deal as a witness in the case, but Worth never missed an opportunity to bring his name into the trial. "They uncovered a lot of stuff about Nathan Deal," Worth told jurors in her closing remarks. "They were ready to move on it. Stacey Kalberman, on May 3 (2011) disclosed violations of Nathan Deal, and within a month, she was told of her salary reduction." But Ethics Commission attorney Bryan Webb tried to convince jurors that when commissioners cut Kalberman's salary by $35,000, it was simply for budgetary reasons. He argued that, when Kalberman asked for a raise in the midst of a budget crisis, she acknowledged commissioners lost faith in her ability to do the job. "She had the gall to say the sky is falling, we're going to run out of money," said Webb. "And then said, I want $5,000 for myself. Kalberman took some actions that actually made the commission start to question her abilities and question her judgment." In a written statement, Gov. Deal's Office said: "Today’s verdict centered around an internal dispute between former employees and former commissioners of the Georgia Government Transparency and Campaign Finance Commission, which is a body that operates independently of elected officials. There’s a reason no member of the governor’s staff was called to testify: because there’s no connection to this office. "After the most exhaustive review of such a case in Georgia history, commissioners last year ruled that the charges levied against Deal for Governor lacked merit. Those decisions are rendered by the commissioners, not commission staff. As such, who the commission employed as staff had no relevance to the Deal for Governor case." After the verdict, Kalberman hugged her husband and her attorney. "I just knew that the right thing wasn't done," said Kalberman. "What happened to me was purposeful." Sen. Jason Carter released a statement on the verdict: "This whistle-blower trial opened a new window into the unethical culture of Gov. Deal’s administration,” Carter said. “Between this trial, the ongoing federal grand jury inquiry, and the new revelations that the governor used his official taxpayer-paid staff to advance his private business dealings, it is clear that this governor doesn’t think that the rules apply to him. “We need leaders we can trust to put Georgia citizens ahead of their own personal gain, and we need an ethics commission that is free to do its job without fear of this sort of politically-motivated retaliation." http://www.wsbtv.com/news/local/jury-sides-former-state-ethics-commission-director/137114582
  14. Dobermans engage in minority based worship.
  15. Macready 2020
  16. I don't know, because I'm not in the FBI, and because they haven't finished their investigation and made any public findings yet. It was unprecedented that Comey even confirmed the existence of the investigation. Could be nothing, could be something. I don't know, and neither do you, for now at least.
  17. Hopefully Jeter will inject some hot Latin *** into the team.
  18. To be fair, America lets its dog **** in Russia's yard and doesn't pick it up. But point taken.
  19. Yeah, there's meddling, and then there's collusion. We meddle in the rest of the world's elections, and Russia and China both meddle in ours. But colluding with a candidate and/or party is something else.